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Pink Book - Making Health Communication Programs Work

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Appendix D: Selected Readings and Resources

Academy for Educational Development. (1995). A tool box for building health communication capacity. Washington, DC.

Adler, E. (1993). Everyone’s guide to successful publications: How to produce powerful brochures, newsletters, flyers, and business communications, start to finish. Berkeley, CA: PeachPit.

Agency for International Development, Academy for Educational Development. (1992). Results and realities: A decade of experience in communication for child survival. Washington, DC.

Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry. (1994). Guidelines for planning and evaluating environmental health education programs. Atlanta.

American Cancer Society. (2001). Cancer facts and figures. Atlanta.

American Marketing Association, New York Chapter. (2001). The focus group directory. New York.

American Marketing Association, New York Chapter. (2001/2002). Green Book: International directory of marketing research companies and services. New York.

American Public Health Association. (2000). APHA media advocacy manual 2000. Washington, DC.

Andreasen, A. (1988). Cheap but good marketing research. Homewood, IL: Dow Jones-Irvin.

Andreasen, A. (1995). Marketing social change: Changing behavior to promote health, social development, and the environment. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Arkin, E. B., Romano, R. M., Van Nevel, J. P., & McKenna, W. (1993). Effect of the mass media in promoting calls to the Cancer Information Service. In The Cancer Information Service: A 15-year history of service and research (Monograph of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, No. 14).

Backer, T. E., Rogers, E. M., & Sopory, P. (1992). Designing health communication campaigns: What works. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Bandura, A. (1986). Social foundations of thought and action: A social cognitive theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.

Bettman, J. R. (1979). An information processing theory of consumer choice. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Calvert, P. (Ed.). (1996). The communicator’s handbook: Tools, techniques, and technology (3rd ed.). Gainesville, FL: Maupin House.

Campbell, M. K., DeVellis, B. M., Strecher, V. J., Ammerman, A. S., DeVellis, R. F., & Sandler, R. S. (1994). The impact of message tailoring on dietary behavior change for disease prevention in primary care settings. American Journal of Public Health, 84, 783–787.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. (1994). Careful concept development paves the way to effective prevention materials [Technical Assistance Bulletin]. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. (1994). Conducting focus groups with young children requires special considerations and techniques [Technical Assistance Bulletin]. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. (1994). Following specific guidelines will help you assess cultural competence in program design, application, and management [Technical Assistance Bulletin]. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. (1994). A key step in developing prevention materials is to obtain expert and gatekeeper reviews [Technical Assistance Bulletin]. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. (1994). Pretesting is essential: You can choose from various methods [Technical Assistance Bulletin]. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. (1994). You can increase your media coverage [Technical Assistance Bulletin]. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. (1994). You can manage focus groups effectively for maximum impact [Technical Assistance Bulletin]. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. (1994). You can prepare easy-to-read materials [Technical Assistance Bulletin]. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. (1994). You can use communications principles to create culturally sensitive and effective prevention materials [Technical Assistance Bulletin]. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention. (1998). Evaluating the results of communication programs [Technical Assistance Bulletin]. Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

Center for Substance Abuse Prevention Communications Cooperative Agreements. (1996). Bridging the gap for people with disabilities. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (1994). Listening to your audience: Using focus groups to plan breast and cervical cancer public education programs (CDC Publication No. PDF-245K). Denver: AMC Cancer Research Center.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (1994). The prevention marketing initiative community kit: It’s your move, prevent AIDS (CDC Publication No. D738). Atlanta.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (1996). The prevention marketing initiative: Applying prevention marketing (CDC Publication No. D905). Atlanta.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2000). Beyond the brochure (CDC Publication No. PDF-821K). Atlanta.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2001). CDCynergy 2001 [CD-ROM]. Atlanta.

Coyle, S. L., Boruch, R. F., & Turner, C. F. (Eds.). (1991). Evaluating AIDS prevention programs: Expanded edition. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Davis, J. (Ed.). (2001). Health and medicine on the Internet: An annual guide to the World Wide Web for health care professionals. Los Angeles: Practice Management Information Corporation.

Debus, M. (1988). Methodological review: A handbook for excellence in focus group research. Washington, DC: Academy for Educational Development.

The Dialog Corporation. (2001). Packaged facts. Available: http://library.dialog.com/sourcebook/researchline/pf.html.

Dignan, M. B., & Carr, P. A. (1992). Program planning for health education and health promotion (2nd ed.). Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger.

Eng, T. R., & Gustafson, D. H. (Eds.). (1999). Wired for health and well-being: The emergence of interactive health communication. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, U.S. Government Printing Office.

Fishbein, M., & Ajzen, I. (1975). Belief, attitude, intention and behavior: An introduction to theory and research. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

Flay, B. R., & Cook, T. D. (1989). Three models for evaluating prevention campaigns with a mass media component. In R. E. Rice & C. K. Atkin (Eds.), Public communication campaigns (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Flay, B. R., Kessler, R. C., & Utts, J. M. (1991). Evaluating media campaigns. In S. L. Coyle, R. F. Boruch, & C. F. Turner (Eds.), Evaluating AIDS prevention programs. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

Glanz, K., Lewis, F. M., & Rimer, B. K. (Eds.). (1997). Health behavior and health education: Theory, research, and practice (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Glanz, K., & Rimer, B. K. (1995). Theory at a glance: A guide for health promotion practice (NIH Publication No. 97-3896). Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute.

Glassman, B. & Rimer, B. K. (1999). Is there a use for tailored print communications in cancer risk communications? (Monograph of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, No. 25).

Goldberg, M. E., Fishbein, M. F., & Middlestadt, S. E. (Eds.). (1997). Social marketing: Theoretical and practical perspectives. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Green, L.W., Gottlieb, N. H., & Parcel, G. S. (1987). Diffusion theory extended and applied. In W. B.Ward (Ed.), Advances in health education and promotion. Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.

Green, L.W., & Kreuter, M.W. (1999). Health promotion planning: An educational and ecological approach (3rd ed.). Mountain View, CA: Mayfield.

Green, L.W., & Ottoson, J. M. (1999). Community and population health (8th ed.). New York: McGraw-Hill.

Ipsos-ASI, Inc. Market research database of diagnostic norms. Norwalk, CT. Information: www.ipsos-asi.com.

Janz, N. K., & Becker, M. H. (1984). The health belief model: A decade later. Health Education Quarterly, 11, 1–47.

Jernigan, D. H., & Wright, P. A. (1996). Media advocacy: Lessons from community experiences. Journal of Public Health Policy, 17, 306–330.

Jones, J. P. (Ed.). (1998). How advertising works: The role of research. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Kotler, P., & Roberto, E. L. (1989). Social marketing: Strategies for changing public behavior. New York: Free Press.

Lefebvre, R. C. (2000). Theories and models in social marketing. In P. N. Bloom & G. T. Gundlach (Eds.), Handbook of marketing and society. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Lefebvre, R. C., & Rochlin, L. (1997). Social marketing. In K. Glanz, F. M. Lewis, & B. K. Rimer (Eds.), Health behavior and health education: Theory, research, and practice (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

Lipkus, I. M., Lyna, P. R., & Rimer, B. K. (1999). Using tailored interventions to enhance smoking cessation among African Americans at the community health center. Nicotine and Tobacco Research, 1(1), 77–85.

Maibach, E., Maxfield, A., Ladin, K., & Slater, M. (1996). Translating health psychology into effective health communication. Journal of Health Psychology, 1, 261–277.

Maibach, E., & Parrott, R. L. (Eds.). (1995). Designing health messages: Approaches from communication theory and public health practice. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Marketing Research Association. (2001). Blue book 2001. Available: www.bluebook.org/scripts/bluebook/index.efm.

Matiella, A. C. (Ed.). (1990). Getting the word out: A practical guide to AIDS materials development. Santa Cruz, CA: Network Publications.

McGuire, W. J. (1984). Public communication as a strategy for inducing health-promoting behavioral change. Preventive Medicine, 13(3), 299–313.

Merton, R. K. (1987). Focused interviews and focus groups: Continuities and discontinuities. Public Opinion Quarterly, 51, 550–556.

Merton, R. K., Riske, M., & Kendall, P. L. (1996). The focused interview (2nd ed.). New York: Free Press.

Miller, J., & Pifer, L. K. (1993). Public understanding of biomedical science in the United States, 1993: A report to the National Institutes of Health. Chicago: Chicago Academy of Science.

Morgan, D. L., & Krueger, R. A. (1998). The focus group kit. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Morra, M. E. (Ed.). (1998). The impact and value of the Cancer Information Service: A model for health communication. Journal of Health Communication, 3(3) Suppl.

Muraskin, L. D. (1993). Understanding evaluation: The way to better prevention programs. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education.

National Cancer Institute. (1993). A picture of health (NIH Publication No. 94-3604). Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

National Cancer Institute. (1994). Clear and simple: Developing effective print materials for low-literate readers (NIH Publication No. 95-3594). Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

National Cancer Institute. (1996). Cancer rates and risks (4th ed.; NIH Publication No. 96-691). Bethesda, MD: Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program.

National Cancer Institute. (1998) How the public perceives, processes, and interprets risk information: Findings from focus group research with the general public. Rockville, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

National Cancer Institute. (1998). Media strategies for smoking control guidelines. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

National Cancer Institute. (2000). Multi-ethnic focus groups to test motivational messages on mammography and breast cancer. Bethesda, MD.

Palmgreen, P., et al. (1995). Reaching at-risk populations in a mass media drug abuse prevention campaign: Sensation seeking as a targeting variable. Drugs and Society, 8(3), 29–45.

Porras, J. I., & Roberston, P. J. (1987). Organization development theory: A typology and evaluation. In R.W.Woodman & W. A. Pasmore (Eds.), Research in organizational change and development (Vol. 1). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.

Prochaska, J. O., & Velicer, W. F. (1997). The transtheoretical model of health behavior change. American Journal of Health Promotion, 12(1), 38–48.

Rice, M., & Valdivia, L. (1991). A simple guide for design, use, and evaluation for education materials. Health Education Quarterly, 18(1), 79–85.

Rice, R. E., & Atkin, C. K. (2000). Public communication campaigns (3rd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Rimer, B. K. (1995). Audiences and messages for breast and cervical cancer screenings. Wellness Perspectives: Research, Theory, and Practice, 11(2), 13–39.

Rimer, B. K., & Glassman, B. (1998). Tailoring communications for primary care settings. Methods of Information in Medicine, 37(3), 171-177.

Rogers, E. M. (1983). Diffusion of innovations (3rd ed.). New York: Free Press.

Rossi, P. H., Freeman, H. E., & Lipsey, M.W. (1998). Evaluation: A systematic approach (6th ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Rothman, J., & Tropman, J. E. (1987). Models of community organization and macro practice: Their mixing and phasing. In F. M. Cox, J. L. Ehrlich, J. Rothman, & J. E. Tropman (Eds.), Strategies of community organization (4th ed.). Itasca, IL: Peacock.

Schooler, C., Chaffee, S. H., Flora, J. A., & Roser, C. (1998). Health campaign channels: Tradeoffs among reach, specificity, and impact. Human Communication Research, 24, 410–432.

Selden, C. R., Zorn, M., Ratzan, S., & Parker, R. M. (2000). Health literacy, January 1990 through October 1999. Bethesda, MD: National Library of Medicine.

Siegel, M., & Doner, L. (1998). Marketing public health: Strategies to promote social change. Gaithersburg, MD: Aspen.

Slater, M. D. (1996). Theory and method in health audience segmentation. Journal of Health Communication, 1, 267–283.

Strecher, V. J., Kreuter, M.W., DenBoer, C. H., Kobrin, S. C., Hospers, H. J., & Skinner, C. S. (1994). The effects of computer-tailored smoking cessation messages in family practice settings. Journal of Family Practice, 39, 262–270.

Strecher, V. J., & Rosenstock, I. M. (1997). The health belief model. In K. Glanz, F. M. Lewis, & B. K. Rimer (Eds.), Health behavior and health education: Theory, research, and practice (2nd ed.). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.

U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. (2000). Healthy people 2010 (2nd ed.; in two volumes: Understanding and improving health and Objectives for improving health.). Washington, DC: U.S. Government Printing Office.

University of Kansas. (2002). Community Toolbox, Community Workstation. Available at http://ctb.lsi.ukans.edu/tools/CWS/socialmarketing/outline.htm.

University of Toronto. (1999). Overview of health communication campaigns. Toronto, Canada: Health Communication Unit, Centre for Health Promotion, University of Toronto.

Wallach, L., & Dorfman, L. (1996). Media advocacy: A strategy for advancing policy and promoting health. Health Education Quarterly, 23(3), 293–317.

Wallach, L., Dorfman, L., Jernigan, D., & Themba, M. (1993). Media advocacy and public health: Power of prevention. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Wallach, L., Woodruff, K., Dorfman, L., & Diaz, I. (1999). News for a change: An advocate’s guide to working with the media. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Weitzman, E. A., & Miles, M. B. (1995). Computer programs for qualitative data analysis: A software sourcebook. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.

Wells, W. D. (Ed.). (1997). Measuring advertising effectiveness. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.

Windsor, R.W., Baranowski, T. B., Clark, N. C., & Cutter, G. C. (1994). Evaluation of health promotion, health education and disease prevention programs (2nd ed.). Mountain View, CA: Mayfield.