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Facing Forward: When Someone You Love Has Completed Cancer Treatment

  • Posted: 11/30/2010

Overview

The purpose of this booklet is to help support you as you adjust, now that treatment is over for your loved one.

You need to know all that you can about not only what happens during treatment, but what to expect right afterwards--so you don't get depressed when it doesn't magically all go away. - Evan
"You need to know all that you can about not only what happens during treatment, but what to expect right afterwards--so you don't get depressed when it doesn't magically all go away." - Evan

Use this booklet in whatever way works best for you. Each caregiver has a unique response to having had a loved one with cancer. This booklet was written to share common feelings and reactions that many caregivers just like you have had after treatment ended. It also offers some practical tips to help you through this time. You can read it from front to back. Or you can just refer to different sections as you need them.

It's important for caregivers to understand that even though treatment has ended, cancer survivors are still coping with a lot. Often they are still dealing with side effects from treatment and learning how to adjust to the many other changes they have gone through. They may not be returning back to normal life as soon as they, and perhaps you, had hoped.

As a caregiver, it can help you, friends, and family members to recognize the issues cancer survivors are facing. For this reason, we encourage you to read the NCI booklet, Facing Forward: Life After Cancer Treatment. This booklet covers issues for the survivor that happen after treatment ends. Concerns include follow-up medical care, physical and emotional changes, changes in social relationships, and workplace issues. Reading the booklet may help you understand the things people face after treatment, and allow you to better understand their perspectives.

Terms Used: This booklet uses the terms "loved one" and "patient" throughout to describe the person you are caring for. In addition, for ease of reading, we alternate using the pronouns "he" and "she" when referring to the person with cancer.

Here are other NCI booklets for caregivers that can be ordered or printed from the Web. See the inside cover to order.