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Highlighted NCI-Supported Cancer Studies
  • Posted: 02/10/2004

Breast Imaging Study

Name of the Trial

Pilot Screening Study of Breast Imaging Outcome Measures in Women at High Genetic Risk of Breast Cancer (NCI-01-C-0009). See the protocol summary.

Principal Investigator

Dr. Sheila Prindiville of the NCI’s Center for Cancer Research and Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics.

Dr. Sheila Prindiville
Dr. Sheila Prindiville
Principal Investigator

Why This Study Is Important

Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer among women in the United States. Changes in certain genes (BRCA1, BRCA2, and others) increase the risk of breast cancer.

Imaging tests such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or positron emission tomography (PET) scans may improve the ability to detect breast cancer in women who have a genetic risk for the disease. This breast imaging study is exploring whether MRI can detect cancer better than standard mammography in women who have a genetic risk. PET scans are being used for any study participant whose mammogram or MRI findings require additional evaluation. Breast Duct Lavage, a noninvasive technique in which breast cells are washed from the lining of breast milk ducts, is also being studied to determine if cellular or molecular changes in duct lavage fluid can be used to detect cancer before it is clinically detectable.

“We hope that these new breast imaging and nipple fluid sampling techniques will enable us to find breast cancer at an even earlier stage in women who are at high risk of this disease, particularly in younger women for whom mammography is less effective in finding early breast cancers,” said Dr. Prindiville.

Contact Information

This study is no longer accepting new patients. To locate other clinical trials for breast cancer, search the NCI database of clinical trials or call the NCI's Clinical Studies Support Center (CSSC) at 1-888-NCI-1937 (1-888-624-1937). The CSSC provides information about cancer trials taking place on the NIH campus in Bethesda, Md. The call is toll-free and completely confidential.

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