Español
Questions About Cancer? 1-800-4-CANCER
  • Print
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest

New Targeted Therapy for Solid Tumors and Lymphomas

Name of the Trial

Phase I Study of 17-Dimethylaminoethylamino-17-Demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG) in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors or Lymphoma (NCI-04-C-0218). See the protocol summary.

Principal Investigator

Dr. Martin Gutierrez, NCI's Center for Cancer Research.

Why Is This Trial Important?

Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are found in every cell of the body. HSPs help cells survive stressful conditions (including heat, cold, nutrient starvation, and oxygen deprivation) by protecting other proteins. Under non-stressful conditions, HSPs help proteins achieve and maintain their proper shape. Researchers at NCI are investigating a particular HSP, called HSP-90, as a target for cancer therapy. Many of the proteins implicated in cancer development need HSP-90 to help them achieve their correct functional shape and cellular location.

In this trial, researchers are studying 17-DMAG, an HSP-90 inhibitor developed by the NCI, to see if it can help prevent cancer cells from growing in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas. The trial will also be used to determine the maximum dose of 17-DMAG that can be given to patients and examine what side effects the drug may cause.

"Preclinical research results suggest that inhibiting HSP-90 will alter many of the protein pathways in tumor cells and may result in tumor cell death," said Dr. Gutierrez. "This is the first test of 17-DMAG in humans, and so far, the drug has been well tolerated.

"We think that 17-DMAG's mode of action may represent an important new approach in the treatment of many types of cancer."

Contact Information

This clinical trial is no longer accepting new patients. To locate other clinical trials for solid tumors or lymphoma, search the NCI database of clinical trials or call the NCI Clinical Trials Referral Office at 1-888-NCI-1937. The call is toll free and confidential.

  • Posted: August 10, 2004
  • Updated: July 18, 2007