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Featured Clinical Trials

Highlighted NCI-Supported Cancer Studies < Back to Main

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Other Gastrointestinal Cancers - Featured Clinical Trials

The following list shows Featured Clinical Trials for a specific type of cancer. You may also want to view:

  • Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer
    (Posted: 01/31/2014) - In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.
  • Targeting the Hedgehog Pathway in Stomach Cancer
    (Posted: 06/01/2010) - This phase II will recruit patients with inoperable cancer of the stomach or gastroesophageal junction who have not been previously treated for advanced disease. They will be randomly assigned to receive either the combination chemotherapy regimen FOLFOX plus the Hedgehog antagonist GDC-0449 or FOLFOX plus a placebo.
  • Targeted Treatment for Advanced Solid Tumors
    (Posted: 12/16/2008) - This clinical trial combines the drug dasatinib with the angiogenesis inhibitor bevacizumab for patients with metastatic or unresectable solid tumors.
  • Refining Treatment for Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors
    (Posted: 08/05/2008) - In this randomized trial, patients with unresectable or metastatic GIST will receive imatinib therapy with or without the addition of bevacizumab. Researchers hope that the combination of imatinib and bevacizumab will help extend progression-free survival.
  • Combination Therapy for Peritoneal Carcinomatosis
    (Posted: 03/21/2006, Updated: 04/26/2007) - In this clinical trial, patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis from low-grade gastrointestinal cancers will be treated with surgery to remove all visible tumors (operative debulking). During surgery, half of the patients will also be treated with hyperthermic chemotherapy administered directly into the peritoneal cavity (continuous hyperthermic peritoneal perfusion).