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Featured Clinical Trials

Highlighted NCI-Supported Cancer Studies

Pancreatic Cancer - Featured Clinical Trials

The following list shows Featured Clinical Trials for a specific type of cancer. You may also want to view:

  • Blocking DNA Repair in Advanced BRCA-Mutated Cancer
    (Posted: 01/31/2014) - In this trial, patients with relapsed or refractory advanced cancer and confirmed BRCA mutations who have not previously been treated with a PARP inhibitor will be given BMN 673 by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles.
  • Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer
    (Posted: 08/07/2012) - In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from the blood of patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer these cells to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will then be multiplied and infused into the patients to fight their cancer.
  • Optimizing Adjuvant Therapy for Resected Pancreatic Cancer
    (Posted: 06/15/2010, Updated: 03/08/2011) - In this clinical trial, patients with resected pancreatic head cancer will be randomly assigned to receive either gemcitabine with or without erlotinib for 5 treatment cycles. Patients who do not experience disease progression or recurrence will then be randomly assigned to undergo an additional cycle of the same chemotherapy regimen with or without subsequent chemoradiation using either 5-FU or capecitabine.
  • Combining Chemotherapy and a PARP Inhibitor for Advanced Solid Tumors
    (Posted: 11/03/2009) - In this clinical trial, patients who have solid tumors that cannot be removed by surgery or that have spread to other areas of the body will be treated with the PARP inhibitor AZD2281 and chemotherapy drugs cisplatin and gemcitabine.
  • Immunotherapy for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer
    (Posted: 04/25/2006, Updated: 06/13/2008) - In this trial, researchers are using a monoclonal antibody called MDX-010 to treat patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. MDX-010 binds to and blocks the activity of an immune response inhibitor molecule called CTLA-4.
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