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Featured Clinical Trials Supported by the National Cancer Institute


Today, thousands of cancer clinical trials are under way in the United States. Clinical trials answer vital research questions that lead to better screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment options for all cancers. This section highlights NCI-supported cancer trials and demonstrates the breadth of clinical cancer research supported by the Institute.

To find other cancer trials open to enrollment:

  • Call NCI's Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) for information about trials all across the country. The call is toll-free and completely confidential.
  • Use the clinical trials search form to look online for trials listed on NCI's Cancer.gov website. The form has a Help link for tips about searching for clinical trials.
  • For information about cancer trials taking place on the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland, call NCI’s Clinical Trials Referral Office at 1-888-NCI-1937 (1-888-624-1937). The call is toll-free and completely confidential.
  • Dietary Intervention for Patients Receiving Chemoradiotherapy for Lung Cancer
    (Posted: 11/13/2012) - In this phase I clinical trial, patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer who are about to undergo chemoradiation therapy will consume a very low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet for the duration of their treatment.
  • Comparing Relaxation Programs for Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Radiotherapy
    (Posted: 10/16/2012) - In this study, women with breast cancer who have had surgery and are scheduled to undergo radiation therapy will be randomly assigned to one of two different stretching and relaxation programs or to a control group that will receive usual care.
  • Treating KSHV-Associated Multicentric Castleman Disease
    (Posted: 09/18/2012) - In this pilot study, patients with KSHV-associated multicentric Castleman disease will receive intravenous tocilizumab every other week for up to 12 weeks. Patients who do not benefit from tocilizumab therapy alone may go on to receive high-dose AZT and valganciclovir in addition to tocilizumab.
  • Genetically Engineered Immunotherapy for Advanced Cancer
    (Posted: 08/07/2012) - In this trial, doctors will collect T lymphocytes from the blood of patients with advanced mesothelin-expressing cancer and genetically engineer these cells to recognize mesothelin. The gene-engineered cells will then be multiplied and infused into the patients to fight their cancer.
  • Trastuzumab for Women with HER2-Low Breast Cancer
    (Posted: 06/26/2012) - In this clinical trial, women who have recently undergone surgical resection for HER2-low breast cancer and are at high risk for recurrence will undergo adjuvant chemotherapy and be randomly assigned to 1 year of trastuzumab treatment or no trastuzumab.
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