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Featured Clinical Trials Supported by the National Cancer Institute


Today, thousands of cancer clinical trials are under way in the United States. Clinical trials answer vital research questions that lead to better screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment options for all cancers. This section highlights NCI-supported cancer trials and demonstrates the breadth of clinical cancer research supported by the Institute.

To find other cancer trials open to enrollment:

  • Call NCI's Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) for information about trials all across the country. The call is toll-free and completely confidential.
  • Use the clinical trials search form to look online for trials listed on NCI's Cancer.gov website. The form has a Help link for tips about searching for clinical trials.
  • For information about cancer trials taking place on the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland, call NCI’s Clinical Trials Referral Office at 1-888-NCI-1937 (1-888-624-1937). The call is toll-free and completely confidential.
  • Eliminating Hairy Cell Leukemia Minimal Residual Disease
    (Posted: 10/19/2010) - In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have disease-related symptoms that require treatment, and who have not been treated or have had only one prior treatment with cladribine, will be randomly assigned to receive cladribine with either concurrent rituximab or rituximab at least 6 months after completing cladribine therapy.
  • Cediranib to Treat Alveolar Soft Part Sarcoma
    (Posted: 08/10/2010) - In this trial, patients with metastatic alveolar soft part sarcoma will be treated with cediranib by mouth once a day in 28-day cycles until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity.
  • Defining Therapy for Recurrent Platinum-sensitive Ovarian Cancer
    (Posted: 06/10/2008) - In this phase III clinical trial, women with platinum-sensitive, recurrent ovarian epithelial, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer will be randomly assigned to undergo secondary cytoreductive surgery, if they are candidates for such surgery, and then randomly assigned to chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab. Women who aren't surgical candidates will be randomized to chemotherapy with or without bevacizumab.
  • Radiation Therapies to Treat Brain Metastases
    (Posted: 08/21/2007) - In this clinical trial, doctors are comparing stereotactic radiosurgery alone against stereotactic radiosurgery followed by whole-brain radiotherapy in patients with 1-3 cerebral metastases resulting from cancer elsewhere in the body.
  • Education and Exercise to Prevent Lymphedema
    (Posted: 07/24/2007) - This study compares a lymphedema-prevention education program to the same education program supplemented with an exercise regimen and counseling in women who have been newly diagnosed with breast cancer and who will undergo axillary node dissection.
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