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Featured Clinical Trials Supported by the National Cancer Institute


Today, thousands of cancer clinical trials are under way in the United States. Clinical trials answer vital research questions that lead to better screening, prevention, diagnosis, and treatment options for all cancers. This section highlights NCI-supported cancer trials and demonstrates the breadth of clinical cancer research supported by the Institute.

To find other cancer trials open to enrollment:

  • Call NCI's Cancer Information Service at 1-800-4-CANCER (1-800-422-6237) for information about trials all across the country. The call is toll-free and completely confidential.
  • Use the clinical trials search form to look online for trials listed on NCI's Cancer.gov website. The form has a Help link for tips about searching for clinical trials.
  • For information about cancer trials taking place on the National Institutes of Health campus in Bethesda, Maryland, call NCI’s Clinical Trials Referral Office at 1-888-NCI-1937 (1-888-624-1937). The call is toll-free and completely confidential.
  • Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Treatment-Resistant Blood Cancers
    (Posted: 03/29/2005, Updated: 05/16/2007) - This phase I dose-escalation study is investigating safety and tolerability of siplizumab, and will determine the maximum dose that can be given to patients with CD2-positive lymphoproliferative disease.
  • Targeted Therapy for Mantle Cell Lymphoma
    (Posted: 01/10/2006) - In this trial, researchers will treat mantle cell lymphoma patients with a drug called bortezomib, followed by induction therapy with bortezomib and a chemotherapy combination known as DA-EPOCH-R, along with the drug filgrastim to stimulate white blood cell production. Half of the patients will subsequently receive bortezomib maintenance therapy.
  • Preventing Graft-versus-Host Disease during Hematologic Cancer Treatment
    (Posted: 05/31/2005) - Researchers are investigating whether an immunosuppressive drug, sirolimus, can work with cyclosporine to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) more effectively than cyclosporine alone following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.
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