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Learn About Clinical Trials

  • Updated: 01/01/2012

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States Requiring Coverage of Clinical Trial Costs

A growing number of states have passed legislation or instituted special agreements requiring health plans to pay the cost of routine medical care you receive as a participant in a clinical trial.

Links on this page

Map

Click on a blue-highlighted state/location [or links below] to see the law or agreement and its key provisions

DelawareTennesseeWisconsinWest VirginiaNew JerseyVermontNew HampshireMaineMissouriMarylandLouisianaGeorgiaNorth CarolinaVirginiaOhioIndianaIllinoisMichiganRhode IslandMichiganNevadaWashington, DCWyomingConnecticutCaliforniaNew MexicoArizonaMassachusettsColoradoNebraskaOregonTexasFloridaIowaSouth CarolinaKentuckyAlaska

Information by State

Alabama
Alaska
Arizona
Arkansas
California
Colorado
Connecticut
Delaware
Florida
Georgia
Hawaii
Idaho
Illinois
 
Indiana
Iowa
Kansas
Kentucky
Louisiana
Maine
Maryland
Massachusetts
Michigan
Minnesota
Mississippi
Missouri
Montana
 
Nebraska
Nevada
New Hampshire
New Jersey
New Mexico
New York
North Carolina
North Dakota
Ohio
Oklahoma
Oregon
Pennsylvania
Puerto Rico
 
Rhode Island
South Carolina
South Dakota
Tennessee
Texas
Utah
Vermont
Virginia
Washington
Washington, D.C.
West Virginia
Wisconsin
Wyoming
 

Overview of the issue

Lack of insurance coverage for routine patient care costs is a barrier to enrollment of patients who might otherwise take part in a clinical trial. This lack of coverage also makes it harder for researchers to successfully conduct trials that could improve prevention and treatment options.

Although the laws and agreements listed above address this barrier in many states, coverage varies widely. For example, some states limit coverage to certain trial types. However, starting in 2014, The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act will require health insurers to pay for routine costs of care in approved clinical trials for cancer and other life-threatening diseases. Covered clinical trials may include treatment, prevention, and early detection trials. For more information about this law and coverage of clinical trials, see the article, Insurance Coverage Expanding for Cancer Clinical Trials.

The laws and agreements discussed above do not cover the research costs associated with a trial. In most cases, such costs would be paid for by the group sponsoring the trial, such as the National Cancer Institute or a pharmaceutical company.

Visit Paying for Clinical Trials for an explanation of the different clinical trial costs.

Other Resources

  • To find specific trials in the National Cancer Institute's list of ongoing cancer clinical trials, visit the clinical trials search page.
  • To understand the basics of clinical trials, please see the Learn About Clinical Trials section of this Web site.

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