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Clinical Trial Results - Progress in Cancer Care

These summaries highlight recently released results from cancer clinical trials. The findings are significant enough that they are likely to influence your medical care.

The summaries are listed in reverse chronological order. You may also use the navigation tools on the left to search the summaries by keyword or type of cancer.

  • Study Shows Drug Is Effective for Cancer Patients with Peripheral Neuropathy
    (Updated: 04/15/2013) - Results of a phase III trial (CALGB-170601) show that duloxetine (Cymbalta) effectively treats painful peripheral neuropathy caused by certain types of chemotherapy.
  • NIH trial shows promising results in treating a lymphoma in young people
    (Posted: 04/10/2013) - Patients with a type of cancer known as primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma who received infusions of chemotherapy, but who did not have radiation therapy to an area of the thorax known as the mediastinum, had excellent outcomes, according to clinical trial results.
  • Electrocautery Superior to Topical Treatments for Precancerous Anal Lesions
    (Posted: 04/04/2013) - Results from a randomized clinical trial conducted in Amsterdam suggest that electrocautery is better than topical imiquimod or fluorouracil at treating potentially precancerous anal lesions in HIV-positive men who have sex with men.
  • Ten Years of Tamoxifen Reduces Breast Cancer Recurrences, Improves Survival
    (Posted: 03/20/2013) - Taking adjuvant tamoxifen for 10 years after primary treatment leads to a greater reduction in breast cancer recurrences and deaths than taking the drug for only 5 years, according to the results of a large international clinical trial.
  • Video Eases End-of-Life Care Discussions
    (Posted: 01/12/2010, Updated: 01/03/2013) - Patients with advanced cancer who watched a video that depicts options for end-of-life care were more certain of their end-of-life decision making than patients who only listened to a verbal narrative and were likely to choose comfort care over aggressive medical care for their end-of-life care preferences, according to an article published online November 30, 2009, in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.
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