National Cancer Institute NCI Cancer Bulletin: A Trusted Source for Cancer Research News
November 29, 2011 • Volume 8 / Number 23

NEWS

Researchers Uncover New Mechanism of Resistance to Melanoma Drug

A series of three CT scans from a patient with advanced melanoma who had an initial response to vemurafenib but then progressed. (Image courtesy of Dr. Keith Flaherty, Massachusetts General Hospital)Researchers have discovered a new way that melanoma cells may become resistant to treatment with vemurafenib (Zelboraf), a targeted therapy that has produced dramatic, if transitory, results for some patients with advanced disease. In some cases, the drug has caused tumors to shrink and even disappear, but the treatment invariably stops working. Read more > >

COMMENTARY

Dr. Mason BondA Conversation With Dr. Mason Bond on Improving the Treatment of Patients with Ewing Sarcoma

Dr. Mason Bond of the University of British Columbia in Vancouver discusses the addition of a novel drug combination to standard therapy in patients younger than 50.

SCIENCE SNAPSHOTS

An x-ray crystallography diagram of the BRAF protein (rainbow colored ribbons) combined with the drug vemurafenib (white and colored spheres). Researchers use x-ray crystallography to learn how drugs interact with protein targets. What is this? Click on the image to find out.

An x-ray crystallography diagram of the BRAF protein (green-colored ribbons) combined with the drug vemurafenib (yellow chemical structure). Researchers use x-ray crystallography to learn how drugs interact with protein targets. (Image reprinted from Tsai et al., PNAS 105(8), 2008)

Further reading: "Researchers Uncover New Mechanism of Resistance to Melanoma Drug"

IN DEPTH

UPDATES

  • FDA Update

    • FDA Commissioner Revokes Approval of Bevacizumab for Metastatic Breast Cancer
    • New Form of Asparaginase Approved to Treat Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
    • Ruxolitinib Approved to Treat the Bone Marrow Disease Myelofibrosis
  • Notes

    • National Cancer Advisory Board Will Meet Next Week
    • Proposals Sought for Use of PLCO Data and Biospecimens
    • Cyber-Seminar Will Address Systems Thinking to Solve Public Health Problems
    • NCI Guide on Communicating Data to Lay Audiences Now Available
    • Major League Baseball Limits Players' Use of Tobacco
    • President Obama Encourages Smokers to Quit Article contains video

 

Selected articles from past issues of the NCI Cancer Bulletin are available in Spanish.

The NCI Cancer Bulletin is produced by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), which was established in 1937. Through basic, clinical, and population-based biomedical research and training, NCI conducts and supports research that will lead to a future in which we can identify the environmental and genetic causes of cancer, prevent cancer before it starts, identify cancers that do develop at the earliest stage, eliminate cancers through innovative treatment interventions, and biologically control those cancers that we cannot eliminate so they become manageable, chronic diseases.

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