Español
Questions About Cancer? 1-800-4-CANCER
  • Print
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest
NCI Cancer Center News

University of Chicago study finds grapefruit juice lets patients take lower dose of cancer drug

  • Posted: August 8, 2012

A glass a day of grapefruit juice lets patients derive the same benefits from an anti-cancer drug as they would get from more than three times as much of the drug by itself, according to a new clinical trial. The combination could help patients avoid side effects associated with high doses of the drug and reduce the cost of the medication. In a study from University of Chicago Medicine (home to the University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center) published in August in Clinical Cancer Research, researchers show that eight ounces a day of grapefruit juice can slow the body's metabolism of a drug called sirolimus, which has been approved for transplant patients but may also help many people with cancer.

Click here to read full press release.

###

NCI comprehensive cancer centers logoAmong the research institutions NCI funds across the United States, it currently designates 67 as Cancer Centers. Largely based in research universities, these facilities are home to many of the NCI-supported scientists who conduct a wide range of intense, laboratory research into cancer’s origins and development. The Cancer Centers Program also focuses on trans-disciplinary research, including population science and clinical research. The centers’ research results are often at the forefront of studies in the cancer field.

 

This text may be reproduced or reused freely. Please credit the National Cancer Institute as the source. Any graphics may be owned by the artist or publisher who created them, and permission may be needed for their reuse.