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NCI Staff Present at APHA

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NCI Staff Present at APHA

During APHA’s 2012 Annual Meeting, NCI staff will participate in many sessions as chairs, discussants, and speakers.

To see the NCI at APHA schedule click here:

SESSIONS FEATURING NCI STAFF

Saturday, October 27

Classification of Laws Associated with School Students (C.L.A.S.S.): Tools for State Level Physical Education and School Nutrition Policy Evaluation

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2:15 PM - 4:45 PM PST
Location: MCC South: Esplanade Ballroom 300
Speakers:

  • Frank M. Perna, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Health Behaviors Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • April Oh, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Health Behaviors Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD

The Classification of Laws Associated with School Students (C.L.A.S.S.) website uses two policy classification systems to score state-level codified laws for physical education (PE) and nutrition in schools. The scoring criteria for these systems are based on current public health research and national recommendations and standards for PE and nutrition in schools.


Sunday, October 28

Keys to Writing NCI Meritorious Proposals for Behavioral Science and Cancer Control in Public Health

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2:30 PM – 6:00 PM PST
Location: MCC West: 3008
Speakers:

  • Wen-ying Sylvia Chou, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
  • Veronica Chollette, Process of Care Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Elizabeth Ginexi, Process of Care Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Kelly Blake, Health Communication and Informatics Research Branch, Behavioral Research Program, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

The purpose of this course is to provide an in-depth understanding of the NCI grants and review processes. The workshop addresses an important need in public health research, as early career Investigators encounter tremendous challenges in navigating the NCI grant funding system and express desire for hands-on mentoring opportunities with experienced NCI program staff. This particular workshop targets early career investigators conducting cancer control research and seeking federal funding support. Special emphasis will be placed on public health and social and behavioral sciences as applied to cancer prevention and control. Hosted by Program Directors from the Behavioral Research Program at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), this half-day interactive Learning Institute will describe the grant funding and review processes, highlight funding mechanisms, offer tips for successful proposal writing (including a review of recently funded abstracts to teach knowledge and skills for successful proposal writing), and introduce NCI’s scientific priorities and research portfolio. Our discussion will represent the breadth of research supported by NCI’s Behavior Research Program, including Tobacco Control, Health Communication and Informatics, Process of Care, Health Behavior, and Basic and Bio-behavioral Research. After the presentations, participants will engage in break-out sessions to review and critique one another’s abstracts. During the breakout sessions, faculty will lead discussions on strategies for developing a research program and provide feedback on individual abstracts. The workshop will also include ample time to interact with NCI staff. All attendees should bring a one-page abstract for a proposed project/concept. The abstract should follow the format: Grant purpose/brief proposal summary, background (2-4 sentences), rationale/significance (1-2 sentences), aims/objectives (2-3 sentences), methods/design and analysis (4-6 sentences), implications for anticipated results and contribution to science (1-2 sentences). These will be discussed and critiqued during the breakout sessions.


Monday, October 29

Comprehensive Effect of PE and Competitive Food Laws: Why Researchers and Policymakers Must Consider Both Sides of the Energy Balance Equation

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1:10 PM - 1:30 PM PST
Location: MCC West: 3002
Speakers:

  • Frank M. Perna, Health Promotion Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD

Several studies have analyzed whether state laws governing physical education (PE) or competitive foods are individually associated with student weight status. No study has examined PE and competitive food laws in conjunction, however. Methods: State laws governing competitive food nutrition content and PE time requirements were obtained from the NCI Classification of Laws Associated with School Students. States with moderate PE requirements (<90 minutes/week) and varying competitive food standards (specific and required; nonspecific/recommended; none) were compared to states with no laws in either domain. General linear models, stratified by gender, were used to estimate differences between comparison groups in average within-student body mass index (BMI) change in a cohort of 6,900 students in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, controlling for race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, locale, and state clustering. Results: Moderate PE time requirements were not associated with BMI change unless complemented with specific, required competitive food standards. Boys, for example, gained 0.50 fewer BMI units (95% CI: -0.99, -0.02), on average, if they lived in states with moderate PE time requirements and specific, required competitive food standards, relative to boys in states with neither type of law. Supplementary analyses indicated that moderate PE requirements were not associated with PE attendance or physical activity in boys or girls. Discussion: Moderate PE requirements appear insufficient to reduce BMI gain without strong competitive food laws. Even in states with laws in both domains, reduced BMI gain may be attributable to competitive food laws, given that moderate PE requirements were not associated with activity.


Keeping the Old With the New: Combining Social Media and Traditional Information Dissemination Strategies for Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer

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4:30 PM - 5:30 PM PST
Location: MCC South: Exhibit Hall ABC
Speakers:

  • Jennifer K. Loukissas, Office of Communications and Special Initiatives, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Saloni Nayar, Office of Communications and Special Initiatives, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Amanda Kraiger, Communications Planning and Coordination Branch,Office of Communications and Education, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
  • James Alexander, Office of Partnerships and Dissemination Initiatives, Office of Communications and Education, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Mary C. Fraser, Genetic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Margaret A. Tucker, Human Genetics Program, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

In the United States, skin cancer, while less common among people with darker skin, is often detected at later or advanced stages. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) sought to raise awareness of the risk for skin cancer among people with darker skin and to dispel the belief that only people with light skin are at risk for skin cancer. An “environmental scan” confirmed there was very little content available on this topic. To fill this need, NCI developed Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer, which highlights risk factors, prevention behaviors, and early detection of skin cancer, and was designed for and tested among minority audiences. The effort also targets health professional and advocacy groups who serve these audiences. The products developed were a hard-copy brochure, webpage, video, and content for radio and newspaper features. These materials were promoted through traditional communication channels such as print, radio and television, as well as web-based media channels such as Facebook, Twitter, e-mail, and electronic newsletters. As a result of the promotion efforts, 218 English and Spanish radio stations and 99 ethnic newspapers featured the content. The video garnered 860 views on YouTube, and Twitter generated over 2,000 tracked visits to the webpage. In the first six months of distribution, 11,000 brochures were ordered by 800 different hospitals, treatment centers, and health professionals across the US. Both traditional and web-based media were vital for success in disseminating Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer content.


State Laws for Time Spent in Physical Education, Neighborhood Amenities for Physical Activity and Relationship with Adolescent Weight Status

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4:30 PM - 5:30 PM PST
Location: MCC South: Exhibit Hall ABC
Speakers:

  • April Oh, Division of Cancer Control and Population Sciences, Health Behaviors Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
  • Erin Hennessey, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
  • Kate McSpadden, Health Behaviors Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
  • Frank Perna, Health Promotion Research Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD

This study examines relationships between state laws for physical education (PE) time requirements, neighborhood amenities for physical activity, and adolescent weight status. The National Cancer Institute's 2005 Classification of Laws Associated with School Students (C.L.A.S.S.S) and 2007 National Survey of Children's Health (NSCH) provided data for this time-lagged analysis. A total of 16,271 adolescents from all 50 states and the District of Columbia were included. States were assigned a 0 for no PE time requirements and 1 if state law required PE time. Neighborhood amenities was comprised of the availability of sidewalks, parks/playgrounds, recreation centers and libraries as places to be active and destinations to walk. Weight status was determined by BMI overweight/obese criteria. Results found state PE laws time requirements were associated with weight status among adolescents of low SES. Analyses explored whether states with PE time laws also had adolescents reporting greater neighborhood amenities to be active, and a significant though weak relationship was observed (r=0.10, p<001). Regression models did not find this interaction to be significantly associated with weight. Multinomial logistic regression models regressing neighborhood amenities and PE law, controlling for demographic characteristics, found a significant relationship for amenities (Odds of being normal weight vs obese were 1.10 (1.0,1.13) and weight but not for PE laws. Limitations of analysis include parent-reported BMI, cross-sectional nature of this study and potential variability in implementation of laws. This analysis suggests policy and neighborhood environment factors have a role in adolescent weight with future analyses focusing on low SES populations.


Tuesday, October 30

Investing in Usability Testing to Create Dynamic Educational Materials for Minority Audiences: The Story of the Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer Brochure

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2:30 PM - 3:30 PM PST
Location: MCC South: Exhibit Hall ABC
Speakers:

  • Saloni Nayar, Office of Communications and Special Initiatives, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Jennifer K. Loukissas, Office of Communications and Special Initiatives, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Amanda Kraiger, Communications Planning and Coordination Branch, Office of Communications and Education, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, MD
  • Silvia Inez Salazar, Office of Market Research and Evaluation, Office of Communications and Education, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Mary C. Fraser, Genetic Epidemiology Branch, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD
  • Margaret A. Tucker, Human Genetics Program, Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD

In the United States, skin cancer, while less common among people with darker skin, is often detected at later or advanced stages. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) developed the Anyone Can Get Skin Cancer brochure to raise awareness of the risk for skin cancer among people with darker skin and to dispel the belief that only people with light skin are at risk for skin cancer. The brochure, which highlights the risk factors, prevention behaviors, and early detection of skin cancer, was designed for and tested among minority audiences. NCI conducted formative evaluation through usability testing to identify potential problems that could prevent end-users from reading or understanding the material. NCI led two rounds of usability testing for the brochure with a total of 18 participants drawn from the target audiences, including general participants representing different minorities, physicians, and advocates. Participants were recruited based on their internet access, web experience, and expected use of these materials in traditional and online settings. Participants validated that the text was simple and easy to understand. Their feedback influenced significant changes to the graphics and layout, making them more appealing to the user. Testing revealed the title of the brochure influenced participants' perception of self/user as the target audience. Usability testing confirmed that participants expected to see the material on the web, and viewed the brochure as conduit to related online resources. Usability testing played a critical role in developing a tailored product for target audiences and positioning the material for the web.


Smoke-free Air Law: State Case Law and Legislation on the Issue of Preemption

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2:30 PM – 3:30 PM PST
Location: MCC South: Exhibit Hall ABC
Speakers:

  • Regina el Arculli, Director, State Cancer Legislative Database Program, National Cancer Institute Office of Government and Congressional Relations, Bethesda, MD

The National Cancer Institute's State Cancer Legislative Database (SCLD) Program analyzes and reports laws addressing various cancer-related topic areas, including tobacco control. SCLD also contains records for state case law decisions involving tobacco control preemption. Preemption refers to the superseding of a local (e.g., city, town, or municipality) ordinance by a state law. Seventeen states have issued court decisions addressing preemption in tobacco control law. Under preemption, if a state has passed a law restricting, prohibiting, or otherwise controlling tobacco use in public places (e.g., in restaurants, bars, and workplaces), then its local governments may not pass laws that are more restrictive. Only six of these decisions have determined that the law at the state level took precedence over local ordinances. The remaining rulings have upheld the local tobacco control laws, finding that they either did not directly conflict with the state law, or that the state law was not intended to exclusively regulate the subject of indoor smoking. Preemption has been an obstacle for localities seeking to improve the health of their residents by regulating smoking in public places. However, nine states subsequently passed laws banning smoking in public places after their courts issued decisions addressing preemption of local tobacco control laws. Three of these new state laws include language specifically permitting localities to adopt more restrictive ordinances, and one state law explicitly supersedes local laws. This presentation will discuss the role of preemption in comprehensive state tobacco control law and review relevant state case law and corresponding legislation.