Treatment Clinical Trials for Carcinoma of Unknown Primary

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for carcinoma of unknown primary treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-23 of 23
  • Veliparib, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of veliparib when given together with paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating patients with solid tumors that are metastatic or cannot be removed by surgery and liver or kidney dysfunction. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving veliparib together with paclitaxel and carboplatin may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Clinical Trial of Lurbinectedin (PM01183) in Selected Advanced Solid Tumors

    A Multicenter Phase II Clinical Trial of Lurbinectedin (PM01183) in Selected Advanced Solid Tumors to assess the antitumor activity of lurbinectedin (PM01183) in terms of overall response rate (ORR), in the following advanced solid tumors: small cell lung cancer (SCLC), head and neck carcinoma (H&N), neuroendocrine tumors (NETs), biliary tract carcinoma, endometrial carcinoma, BRCA 1 / 2-associated metastatic breast carcinoma, carcinoma of unknown primary site, germ cell tumors (GCTs), and Ewing's family of tumors (EFTs)
    Location: 5 locations

  • Ziv-aflibercept and Octreotide Pamoate in Treating Patients with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well ziv-aflibercept and octreotide pamoate works in treating patients with neuroendocrine tumors that cannot be removed by surgery. Ziv-aflibercept may stop the growth of neuroendocrine tumors by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Octreotide pamoate may block the use of a hormone called somatostatin by the tumor cells. Giving ziv-aflibercept together with octreotide pamoate may be an effective treatment for neuroendocrine tumors.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Oligo-Recurrent Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well stereotactic radiosurgery works in treating patients with cancer that has come back and has spread to 5 or fewer places in the body (oligometastatic disease). Stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Oligometastatic Disease

    This phase II trial studies how well stereotactic radiosurgery works in treating patients with cancer that has spread to 5 or fewer places in the body and involves 3 or fewer organs (oligometastatic disease). Stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy, is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Phase 1 / 2 Study of LOXO-195 in Patients With Previously Treated NTRK Fusions or Non-fusion NTRK Cancers

    This is a Phase 1 / 2, multi-center, open-label study designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of LOXO-195 when administered orally to patients with NTRK fusion cancers treated with prior TRK inhibition or non-fusion NTRK altered cancers regardless of prior kinase inhibitor treatment.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cisplatin, Nab-Paclitaxel, and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma That Is Metastatic, Locally Recurrent, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well cisplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and cetuximab work in treating patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma that has spread to another place in the body, has come back locally, or cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and nab-paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving cisplatin, nab-paclitaxel, and cetuximab may be an effective treatment for cancer of the oral cavity, oropharynx, larynx, or hypopharynx.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Cetuximab with or without Docetaxel in Treating Patients with Recurrent Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated with Radiation Therapy

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well stereotactic radiosurgery and cetuximab with docetaxel work compared with stereotactic radiosurgery and cetuximab alone in treating patients with head and neck cancer previously treated with radiation therapy that has come back after a period of improvement (recurrent). Stereotactic radiosurgery, also called stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), is a type of external radiation therapy technique where the tumor is precisely localized and a very large amount of radiation is delivered to the tumor. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, may block the growth of tumor cells by targeting a certain protein that regulates tumor growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving stereotactic radiosurgery and cetuximab with or without docetaxel is more effective in killing tumor cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Relapsed Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well docetaxel, cisplatin, and cetuximab work in treating patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck that has spread to the primary site to other places in the body or has come back after a period of improvement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving docetaxel together with cisplatin and cetuximab may be an effective treatment for head and neck cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Everolimus, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Head and Neck Squamous Cell Cancer

    RATIONALE: Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and may stop the growth of head and neck cancer by blocking blood flow to the tumor. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Specialized radiation therapy, such as intensity-modulated radiotherapy, that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving everolimus together with cisplatin and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. PURPOSE: This phase I trial is studying the side effects and best dose of everolimus when given together with cisplatin and radiation therapy in treating patients with locally advanced head and neck squamous cell cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Refractory Lymphomas or Advanced or Refractory Non-melanoma Skin Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well talimogene laherparepvec works and nivolumab in treating patients with lymphomas that do not responded to treatment or non-melanoma skin cancers that have spread to other places in the body or do not responded to treatment. Biological therapies, such as talimogene laherparepvec, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may block a protein needed by tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving talimogene laherparepvec and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with lymphomas or non-melanoma skin cancers.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced HPV Positive Oropharynx Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy works in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV) positive oropharynx cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, cisplatin, fluorouracil and carboplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy may be better in treating oropharynx cancer as there will be fewer side effects.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Pembrolizumab, Cisplatin, and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Stage III-IVb Head and Neck Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works when given during or after cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treating patients with previously untreated stage III-IVb head and neck cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. It is not yet known whether giving pembrolizumab during or after cisplatin and intensity modulated radiation therapy will kill more tumor cells.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or are Metastatic

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with rare tumors that cannot be removed by surgery or have spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block specific proteins found on white blood cells which may strengthen the immune system and control tumor growth.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Mitomycin in Treating Patients with P16 Positive Oropharyngeal or P16 Negative Head and Neck Cancer That is Resistant to Platin, Fluorouracil, Cetuximab, and Taxane

    This phase II trial studies how well mitomycin works in treating patients with tumor protein (p)16 positive oropharyngeal or p16 negative head and neck squamous cell cancer that is resistant to platin, fluorouracil, cetuximab, and taxane. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Genetic Analysis-Guided Dosing of FOLFIRABAX in Treating Patients with Advanced Gastrointestinal Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of genetic analysis-guided dosing of paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, fluorouracil, leucovorin calcium, and irinotecan hydrochloride (FOLFIRABAX) in treating patients with gastrointestinal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, fluorouracil, leucovorin calcium, and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Genetic analysis may help doctors determine what dose of irinotecan hydrochloride patients can tolerate.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Ficlatuzumab and Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Head and Neck Cancer

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best doses of ficlatuzumab when given together with cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has returned after a period of improvement or has spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ficlatuzumab and cetuximab, may block the growth of tumor cells by targeting certain cells and causing the cancer cells to die or stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Docetaxel and Carboplatin with or without Low Dose Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well docetaxel and carboplatin with low dose radiation therapy works compared with docetaxel and carboplatin alone in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or organs (locally advanced) and is previously untreated. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors, and may also make tumor cells more sensitive to chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether giving docetaxel and carboplatin with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: University of Kentucky / Markey Cancer Center, Lexington, Kentucky

  • Cetuximab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer Previously Treated With Cetuximab and Chemoradiation Therapy

    The purposes of this study are to determine if the combination of two drugs, cetuximab and dasatinib, is safe, at what dose levels they should be administered, and also to determine how the combination of the two drugs affects solid tumors.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Cetuximab, EGFR Antisense DNA, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best way to give cetuximab and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antisense deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and radiation therapy and to see how well it works in treating patients with stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the head and neck. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Biological therapies, such as EGFR antisense DNA, may interfere with the growth of tumor cells and slow the growth of head and neck cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving cetuximab, EGFR antisense DNA, and radiation therapy together may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy In Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Cancer of the Oropharynx and Human Papillomavirus Infection

    This phase II trial studies how well giving combination chemotherapy together with radiation therapy works in treating patients with locally advanced stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the oropharynx and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (5-FU), work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving combination chemotherapy together with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Artesunate in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of artesunate in treating patients with solid tumors. Artesunate may help treat cancer caused by the human papillomavirus.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia

  • Nilotinib and Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Solid Tumors That Can Be Treated With Cetuximab

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of nilotinib when given together with cetuximab in treating patients with solid tumors that can be treated with cetuximab. Nilotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as cetuximab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumor to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Giving nilotinib and cetuximab may be an effective treatment for solid tumors.
    Location: MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, Washington, District of Columbia