Treatment Clinical Trials for Testicular Cancer

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for testicular cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 27
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  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Rare Tumors

    This clinical trial studies nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 733 locations

  • Active Surveillance, Bleomycin, Carboplatin, Etoposide, or Cisplatin in Treating Pediatric and Adult Patients with Germ Cell Tumors

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies how well active surveillance, bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 347 locations

  • A Study of Nivolumab in Relapsed / Refractory Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma (PCNSL) and Relapsed / Refractory Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL)

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether Nivolumab is effective in the treatment of Relapsed / Refractory Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma (PCNSL) and Relapsed / Refractory Primary Testicular Lymphoma (PTL)
    Location: 12 locations

  • Veliparib, Paclitaxel, and Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery and Liver or Kidney Dysfunction

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of veliparib when given together with paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating patients with solid tumors that are metastatic or cannot be removed by surgery and liver or kidney dysfunction. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving veliparib together with paclitaxel and carboplatin may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Autologous or Donor Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes in Treating Patients with Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Hematologic Malignancy

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and to see how well they work in treating patients with a hematologic cancer that is positive for Epstein-Barr virus. Vaccines made from a patient or donor's white blood cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill cancer cells.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Large B-Cell Lymphoma, Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma or Gray Zone Lymphomas

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of brentuximab vedotin when given together with combination chemotherapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with untreated large B-cell lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or gray zone lymphomas. Monoclonal antibody-drug conjugates, such as brentuximab vedotin, can block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Giving brentuximab vedotin with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Laboratory-Treated T Cells in Treating Patients With B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of laboratory-treated T cells in treating patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, B-cell lymphoma, or multiple myeloma that has come back or has not gone away after treatment. This study combines two different ways of fighting disease, antibodies (proteins that protect the body from bacterial and other diseases) and T cells (special infection-fighting blood cells that can kill other cells, including cancer cells). Treating the T cells in the laboratory by adding an antibody may help the T cells last longer in the body and kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Multi-Virus-Specific Donor T Cells in Treating Patients With B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Who Have Undergone Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of multi-virus-specific donor T cells to see how well it works in treating patients with B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or non-Hodgkin lymphoma who have undergone donor stem cell transplant. Biological therapies may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. By joining an antibody to the donor T cells that recognize the viruses, it may be able to make the cell that can last a long time in the body, provide protection from viruses, and recognize and kill leukemia.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With B-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    The purpose of this study is to find the biggest dose of chimeric T cells that is safe, to see how the T cell with each sort of chimeric receptor lasts, to learn what the side effects are and to see whether this therapy might help people with lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL).
    Location: 3 locations

  • Autologous or Donor Cytotoxic T-Cells in Treating Patients With Epstein-Barr Virus-Positive Lymphoma, Lymphoepithelioma, or Lymphoproliferative Disorder

    The purpose of this study is to find the largest safe dose of transforming growth factor-beta (TGFb) resistant latent membrane protein (LMP)-specific cytotoxic T cells, to learn what the side effects are and to see whether this therapy might help patients with Hodgkin disease, non-Hodgkin lymphoma and lymphoepithelioma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin works in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have come back or do not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as brentuximab vedotin, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Relapsed and Refractory Gray-Zone Lymphoma, Primary Central Nervous System Lymphoma, or Other Extra-Nodal Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating patients with gray-zone lymphoma, primary central nervous system lymphoma, or other extra-nodal diffuse large B-cell lymphomas that have come back or do not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Retroperitoneal Lymph Node Dissection in Treating Patients with Stage I-IIA Testicular Seminoma

    This phase II trial studies how well retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND) works in treating patients with stage I-IIa testicular seminoma. The retroperitoneum is the space in the body behind the intestines that is typically the first place that seminoma spreads. RPLND is a surgery that removes lymph nodes in this area to treat testicular seminoma and may experience fewer long-term toxicities, such as a second cancer, cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome (pre-diabetes), or lung disease.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Azacitidine and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoid Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of azacitidine when given together with romidepsin and to see how well they work in treating patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoid malignancies. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine together with romidepsin may be an effective treatment for lymphoid malignancies.
    Location: Columbia University / Herbert Irving Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Genetically Modified T-Cells in Treating Patients With Advanced Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of genetically modified T-cells in treating patients with advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Biological therapies, such as genetically modified T-cells may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing.
    Location: Baylor College of Medicine / Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Modified T-Cells in Treating Patients With Epstein-Barr Virus Positive Lymphoma.

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of modified T-cells in treating patients with Epstein-Barr virus positive lymphoma. Some types of lymphoma or lymphoproliferative disease are associated with Epstein-Barr virus. White blood cells that are treated in the laboratory with Epstein-Barr virus may be an effective treatment for lymphoma or lymphoproliferative disease.
    Location: Baylor College of Medicine / Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Donor Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes in Treating Patients With Relapsed Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Diseases

    The purpose of this study is to obtain some of the donor's blood to make latent membrane protein (LMP)-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) so they would be available to potentially treat a recipient who had cancer of other disease associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV).
    Location: Baylor College of Medicine / Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Laboratory-Treated T Lymphocytes in Treating Patients With Hodgkin Lymphoma or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of laboratory-treated T lymphocytes in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. Placing a gene that has been created in the laboratory into white blood cells may make the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells.
    Location: Baylor College of Medicine / Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • High-Dose Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and stem cell transplant work in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have come back. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of tumor cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Also, monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, can find cancer cells and either kill them or deliver cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell or Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This clinical trial studies donor peripheral blood stem cell or bone marrow transplant in treating patients with lymphoma, multiple myeloma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Giving chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and busulfan, and total-body irradiation (TBI) before a donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) or bone marrow transplant (BMT) helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for Germ Cell Tumors

    Treatment options for relapsed or refractory germ cell tumors (GCT) patients are limited. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue (autologous stem cell transplant), when given sequentially, has shown that a subset of patients may be cured. The optimal high-dose chemotherapy regimen, however, is unknown. In this trial, we will use tandem autologous transplants with non-cross resistant conditioning regimens to treat patients with relapsed / refractory GCTs.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Alemtuzumab Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Hematologic Diseases

    This research study will help researchers learn if adding Campath 1H (alemtuzumab) to the low dose chemotherapy patients get before the transplant will decrease the known side effects from an allogeneic stem cell transplantation and provide a treatment for patients with blood disorders or kidney cancer.
    Location: Baylor College of Medicine / Dan L Duncan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Safety and Tolerability Study of PCI-32765 in B Cell Lymphoma and Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    The purpose of this study is to determine the long-term safety of a fixed-dose, daily regimen of PCI-32765 PO in subjects with B cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia / small lymphocytic leukemia (CLL / SLL).
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Accelerated or Standard BEP Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Intermediate or Poor-Risk Metastatic Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well an accelerated schedule of bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin (BEP) chemotherapy works compared to the standard schedule of BEP chemotherapy in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk germ cell tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin sulfate, etoposide phosphate, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving BEP chemotherapy on a faster, or “accelerated” schedule may work better with fewer side effects in treating patients with intermediate or poor-risk metastatic germ cell tumors.
    Location: Childrens Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Phase I Study of Subcutaneous Ocaratuzumab in Patients With Previously Treated CD20+ B-Cell Malignancies

    Ocaratuzumab is a third-generation, fully humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) targeting the CD20 surface marker on normal and malignant B lymphocytes. It has been optimized for an increased binding for CD20 and an enhanced antibody dependent cell medicated cytotoxicity (ADCC) effector function. A previous phase I / II study of intravenously (IV) administered ocaratuzumab in refractory / relapsed follicular lymphoma patients has concluded that ocaratuzumab is safe and well-tolerated at doses up to 375mg / m2 weekly for four weeks. In this proposed phase I study, ocaratuzumab will be administered subcutaneously to patients with previously treated CD20+ B-cell malignancies. Three dose levels (40 mg weekly x 4 doses, 80 mg weekly x 4 doses, and 80 mg weekly x 8 doses) will be investigated for safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic analyses.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.


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