Treatment Clinical Trials for Intraocular Melanoma

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for intraocular melanoma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-18 of 18
  • Safety and Efficacy of IMCgp100 Versus Investigator Choice in Advanced Uveal Melanoma

    To evaluate the overall survival of HLA-A*0201 positive adult patients with previously untreated advanced UM receiving IMCgp100 compared to Investigator's Choice of dacarbazine, ipilimumab, or pembrolizumab.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Study Of OX40 Agonist PF-04518600 Alone And In Combination With 4-1BB Agonist PF-05082566

    To assess the safety and tolerability at increasing dose levels of PF-04518600 alone or in combination wtih PF-05082566 in patients with select advanced or metastatic carcinoma in order to determine the maximum tolerated dose and select the recommended Phase 2 dose.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion vs Best Alternative Care in Patients With Hepatic-dominant Ocular Melanoma

    This study will evaluate two groups of patients who have melanoma that has spread from the eye to the liver: one group (50%) will get high-dose chemotherapy delivered specifically to the liver, while the other group (50%) will get one of 4 standard best alternative care treatments. Patients in each group will get repeating cycles of treatment until the cancer in the liver advances and will be followed until death. This study will evaluate the effect of the treatments on how long patients live and how long it takes for the cancer to advance or respond to the treatment.
    Location: 9 locations

  • A Study of the Intra-Patient Escalation Dosing Regimen With IMCgp100 in Patients With Advanced Uveal Melanoma

    IMCgp100-102 is a Phase I study of the weekly intra-patient escalation dose regimen with IMCgp100 as a single agent in patients with metastatic uveal melanoma (mUM). According to this regimen, all patients in the trial will receive 2 weekly doses of IMCgp100 at a dose level below the identified weekly recommended Phase II dose (RP2D-QW) and then a dose escalation will commence at the third weekly dose at C1D15. The Phase I testing of the intra-patient escalation dosing regimen is designed to achieve a higher exposure and maximal plasma concentration of IMCgp100 after doses at Cycle 1 Day 15 (C1D15) and thereafter .
    Location: 4 locations

  • CDX-1401 and Poly-ICLC Vaccine Therapy with or without CDX-301 in Treating Patients with Stage IIB-IV Melanoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well DEC-205 / NY-ESO-1 fusion protein CDX-1401 (CDX-1401) and neoantigen-based melanoma-poly-ICLC vaccine (poly-ICLC) vaccine therapy work when given with or without recombinant flt3 ligand (CDX-301) in treating patients with stage IIB-IV melanoma. The cancer vaccine CDX-1401 attaches to a protein that is made in tumor cells. The vaccine helps the body recognize the tumor to fight the cancer. The CDX-301 vaccine may help the body make more of the tumor fighting cells, known as dendritic cells. The poly-ICLC vaccine stimulates the immune system and may help these dendritic cells mature so that they can recognize the tumor. It is not yet known whether CDX-1401 and poly-ICLC will work better with or without CDX-301 in treating melanoma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Sotrastaurin Acetate and Alpelisib in Treating Patients with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of sotrastaurin acetate and alpelisib when given together in treating patients uveal melanoma (melanoma that starts in the back of the eye) that has spread to other places in the body. Sotrastaurin acetate and alpelisib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Sunitinib Malate or Valproic Acid in Preventing Metastasis in Patients With High-Risk Uveal Melanoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well sunitinib malate or valproic acid works in preventing high-risk uveal (eye) melanoma from spreading to other parts of the body. Sunitinib malate may stop the transmission of growth signals into tumor cells and prevents these cells from growing. Valproic acid may change the expression of some genes in uveal melanoma and suppress tumor growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Phase 1B / 2 Study in Subjects With Small to Medium Primary Choroidal Melanoma

    The primary objective is to assess the safety, immunogenicity and preliminary efficacy of one of three dose levels and repeat dose regimens of Light-activated AU-011 for the treatment of subjects with primary choroidal melanoma.
    Location: Columbia University / Herbert Irving Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Pembrolizumab and Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Melanoma or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Spread to the Brain

    This pilot trial studies the side effects of giving pembrolizumab together with stereotactic radiosurgery to treat patients with melanoma or non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to the brain. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stereotactic radiosurgery is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving pembrolizumab together with stereotactic radiosurgery may be a better treatment for patients with melanoma or non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to the brain.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Study Evaluating Single and Repeated Intravitreal Doses of ICON-1 in Patients With Uveal Melanoma

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, biological activity, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamic activity of single and repeated escalating intravitreal doses of ICON-1 in patients with primary uveal melanoma who are planned to undergo enucleation or brachytherapy of the affected eye.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Selumetinib Sulfate in Treating Patients with Uveal Melanoma That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of selumetinib sulfate in treating patients with uveal melanoma that has spread from the primary site to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Selumetinib sulfate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Pilot Study to Evaluate the Safety and Efficacy of Combination Checkpoint Blockade Plus External Beam Radiotherapy in Subjects With Stage IV Melanoma

    This is an open-label, multicenter pilot Phase 1 study of the checkpoint antibodies ipilimumab and nivolumab in combination with radiotherapy in 18 subjects with unresectable stage IV melanoma. All subjects will receive concurrent ipilimumab (3 mg / kg) and nivolumab (1 mg / kg) every 3 weeks for 4 doses, followed by nivolumab monotherapy (3 mg / kg) every 2 weeks. Radiotherapy will be initiated after the first dose and before the second dose of immunotherapy.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Combining PD-1 Blockade, CD137 Agonism and Adoptive Cell Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma

    This pilot clinical trial studies tumor infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy, nivolumab, and aldesleukin in treating patients with melanoma that has spread from where it started to other places in the body that cannot be removed by surgery. Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cells that help the body fight infection and other diseases. TIL therapy involves taking lymphocytes from patients' tumors, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, using the drugs aldesleukin and urelumab during part of the process, and then giving them back to the patient which may help fight the tumor. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate white blood cells to kill tumor cells. Giving TIL therapy, nivolumab, and aldesleukin may be a better treatment for metastatic melanoma.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Crizotinib following Surgery or Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with High-Risk Uveal Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well crizotinib works in treating patients with uveal (eye) melanoma when given after surgery or radiation therapy. Crizotinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving crizotinib after surgery or radiation therapy may help prevent the melanoma from returning.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Vemurafenib and Recombinant Interferon alfa-2b in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Melanoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of vemurafenib when given together with recombinant interferon alfa-2b in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma. Vemurafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Recombinant interferon alfa-2b may interfere with the growth of tumor cells and slow the growth of melanoma. Giving vemurafenib and IFN alfa-2b may be an effective treatment for melanoma.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and ipilimumab work in treating patients with uveal melanoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes and High-Dose Aldesleukin with or without Autologous Dendritic Cells in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin with or without autologous dendritic cells work in treating patients with melanoma that has spread to other areas of the body. Vaccines made from a person's tumor cells and special blood cells (dendritic cells) may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate the white blood cells to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin are more effective when given together with or without dendritic cells in shrinking or slowing the growth of melanoma. The clinical benefits of receiving tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in combination with the B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine / threonine kinase (BRAF) inhibitor will be studied, in patients who have progressive disease (PD) with using the BRAF inhibitor prior to TIL treatment. Leptomeningeal disease (LMD) is unfortunately a common development in patients with melanoma, with an extremely poor prognosis, translating into an overall survival of only weeks. With the novel approach of combining intrathecal TILs and intrathecal interleukin (IL)-2, researchers hope to induce long term disease stabilization or remission of LMD.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Vorinostat in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma of the Eye

    This phase II trial studies how well vorinostat works in treating patients with melanoma of the eye that has spread to other parts of the body. Vorinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York