Treatment Clinical Trials for Bladder Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for bladder cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 126-145 of 145
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  • Avelumab and Bacille Calmette-Guerin for the Treatment of Recurrent Non-muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer, ABC Study

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of avelumab and Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) and how well they work for the treatment of non-muscle invasive bladder cancer that has come back (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. BCG is a weakened form of the bacterium Mycobacterium bovis that does not cause disease. BCG is used in a solution to stimulate the immune system in the treatment of bladder cancer. It is unclear whether the addition of avelumab may or may not potentially negate, rather than add to, the treatment effect of BCG alone in recurrent non-muscle invasive bladder cancer.
    Location: University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

  • Pemetrexed and Avelumab in Treating Patients with MTAP-Deficient Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pemetrexed and avelumab work in treating patients with MTAP-deficient urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Pemetrexed may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving pemetrexed and avelumab may work better in treating patients with MTAP-deficient urothelial cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • An Investigational Immunotherapy Study of BMS-986310 Administered Alone and in Combination With Nivolumab in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    The purpose of this study is to determine if BMS-986310 administered in combination with nivolumab, will demonstrate adequate safety and tolerability, as well as a favorable risk / benefit profile, to support further clinical testing.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Radiation Therapy and Durvalumab with or without Tremelimumab in Treating Participants with Unresectable, Locally Advanced, or Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab work in treating participants with bladder cancer that cannot be removed by surgery, has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes, or that has spread to other parts of the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab will work better in treating participants with bladder cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Daratumumab in Treating Patients with Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer or Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    This pilot early phase I trial studies the side effects of daratumumab and to see how well it works in treating patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer or kidney cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with daratumumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • MAGE-A4ᶜ¹º³²T for Multi-Tumor

    This study will investigate the safety and tolerability of MAGE-A4ᶜ¹º³²T cell therapy in subjects who have the appropriate HLA-A2 tissue marker and whose urinary bladder, melanoma, head and neck, ovarian, non-small cell lung, esophageal, gastric, synovial sarcoma, or myxoid / round call liposarcoma (MRCLS) tumor has the MAGE-A4 protein expressed. This study will take a subject's T cells and give them a T cell receptor protein that recognizes and attacks the tumors. This study has a substudy component that will investigate the safety and tolerability of MAGE-A4c1032T cell therapy in combination with low dose radiation in up to 10 subjects.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Trial of EP0057, a Nanoparticle Camptothecin With Olaparib in People With Relapsed / Refractory Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Background: EP0057 consists of a sugar molecule cyclodextrin linked to a chemotherapy drug called camptothecin. The combined molecule or "nanoparticle drug conjugate" travels through the blood. Once inside cancer cells, the chemotherapy drug is released from the molecule. Olaparib is a drug that may stop cancer cells from repairing the DNA damage caused by chemotherapy. Researchers want to see how safe it is to give EP0057 and olaparib together and to see how well the combination treats a specific type of lung cancer called small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Objectives: To test the safety and maximum dose of EP0057 and olaparib together. To test how well they treat small cell lung cancer. Eligibility: Adults 18 and older with small cell lung cancer. Design: Participants will be screened with standard cancer care tests. Participants will get the 2 study drugs in 28-day cycles. EP0057 will be given every 2 weeks, through a small plastic tube in an arm vein. Olaparib will be taken by mouth twice a day most days. Participants will keep a pill diary. For Cycle 1, participants will have 3 visits. All other cycles will have 2 visits. At study visits, participants may have: - Blood and hair samples taken - History and Physical exam - Questions about health and side effects - Pregnancy test - Optional tumor biopsy where a piece of tumor is removed by needle after numbing the skin. - CT scan - Injection of EP0057 (twice per cycle) - Olaparib prescription Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 weeks after finish taking the drugs. They will have a physical exam and blood tests. They may have a tumor biopsy. The study team will call the patient every 3 months for follow up after completing the study treatment.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Patients with HER2 Amplified or Mutant Advanced Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab emtansine works in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) amplified or HER2 mutant cancers, including lung and bladder, that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced). Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab emtansine, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Cabazitaxel, Gemcitabine, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with BCG Solution-Refractory Non-muscle Invasive Urothelial Carcinoma of the Bladder

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of cabazitaxel and gemcitabine, when given together with cisplatin in treating patients with non-muscle invasive urothelial carcinoma of the bladder that has not responded to Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) solution (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cabazitaxel, gemcitabine, and cisplatin work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • A Phase II Study of Bintrafusp Alfa (M7824) in Checkpoint Inhibitor Naive and Refractory Subjects With Urothelial Carcinoma

    Background: Metastatic urothelial carcinoma is lethal and has no cure. Response rates to current treatments are modest. Researchers want to find new strategies to treat the disease. In this study, they will test a drug called M7824. The drug is a new immunotherapy that blocks the pathways that cancer cells use to stop the immune system from fighting cancer. Objective: To learn if M7824 can help the immune system s ability to fight urothelial cancer. Eligibility: People age 18 and older who have urothelial cancer that has spread to other parts of their body and they have been previously treated with chemotherapy or immunotherapy Design: Participants will be screened with a medical history and physical exam. They will have blood and urine tests. They will have imaging scans. They will have an electrocardiogram to measure heart function. Their ability to perform their normal activities will be evaluated. They may have a tumor biopsy. They will take a pregnancy test if needed. Participants will repeat some of the screening tests during the study. Treatment will be given in a series of 28-day cycles. Participants will get M7824 once every 2 weeks. It is given through an intravenous infusion. For this, a small plastic tube is put into an arm vein. They will get M7824 until their disease gets worse, they have unacceptable side effects, or they decide to stop treatment. Participants will have a follow-up visit 30 days after treatment ends. Then they will be followed every 12 weeks in the clinic or by telephone / email. Follow-up will last indefinitely.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Vaccine Response With NT-I7

    Background: People with cancer, and especially older people, have a weakened immune system (the defense system of the body). This is often caused by the treatments for cancer. Older cancer survivors are therefore more prone to getting infections, some of which are preventable through vaccines. But because their immune systems are weakened, their response to vaccines is poor. Researchers want to see if a new drug, NT-I7, can help. Objective: To see if NT-I7 can boost the immune system. Eligibility: Adults 60 and older who have recently finished chemotherapy for breast, colorectal, or bladder cancer. Design: Participants will be screened with a physical exam, medical history, and blood and urine samples. Their heart s electrical activity will be checked. They will have an ultrasound of their spleen. They may give a tissue sample from a previous biopsy. Participants in phase 1a of the study will get 1 dose of NT-I7. It will be given by injection with a needle into the muscle of the upper arm, thigh, or buttocks. Participants in phase 1b will get 5 vaccines over a few months. They may get an optional booster and / or 6th vaccine. They will also get NT-I7. Participants will repeat the screening tests during the study. They may get a peripheral intravenous catheter in a vein in their hand or arm for blood draws. Participants may have apheresis. For this, blood is taken from an arm vein. The white blood cells are separated from the blood. The rest of the blood, minus the white blood cells, is returned into a vein in the other arm. A catheter may be used. Participants will have follow-up visits for 1 year.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Study of EDP1503 in Patients With Colorectal Cancer, Breast Cancer, and Checkpoint Inhibitor Relapsed Tumors

    This study is being conducted to assess the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of EDP1503 alone and in combination with pembrolizumab in patients with advanced metastatic colorectal carcinoma, triple-negative breast cancer, and checkpoint inhibitor relapsed tumors
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • An Efficacy and Safety Study of Erdafitinib (JNJ-42756493) in Participants With Urothelial Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the objective response rate (complete response [CR]+ partial response [PR]) of the selected dose regimen in participants with metastatic or surgically unresectable urothelial cancers that harbor specific FGFR genomic alterations.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Tesetaxel for Previously Treated Patients With Bladder Cancer

    The intravenously administered taxanes, docetaxel and paclitaxel, alone and in combination with other chemotherapy agents are active in patients with advanced and metastatic bladder cancer, and agents of this class are a promising treatment option for some patients. Tesetaxel is an orally administered taxane that is in development as treatment for subjects with advanced cancers. This study is being conducted to determine the efficacy and safety of tesetaxel administered to patients previously treated with chemotherapy for progressive metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Comparing the New Anti-cancer Drug Eribulin with or without Chemotherapy Against the Usual Chemotherapy Alone in Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase III trial compares the usual chemotherapy treatment to eribulin alone and to eribulin plus gemcitabine in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Chemotherapy drugs, such as eribulin, gemcitabine, docetaxel, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial aims to see whether adding eribulin to standard of care chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with metastatic urothelial cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Perioperative Enfortumab Vedotin (EV) Plus Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) Versus Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Cisplatin-eligible Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer (MIBC) (MK-3475-B15 / KEYNOTE-B15 / EV-304)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the antitumor efficacy and safety of perioperative enfortumab vedotin (EV) plus pembrolizumab and radical cystectomy (RC) + pelvic lymph node dissection (PLND) compared with the current standard of care (neoadjuvant chemotherapy [gemcitabine plus cisplatin] and RC + PLND) for participants with MIBC who are cisplatin-eligible. The dual primary hypotheses are preoperative EV + pembrolizumab and RC + PLND (Arm A) will achieve superior pathologic complete response (pCR) rate and perioperative EV and pembrolizumab and RC + PLND (Arm A) will achieve superior event free survival (EFS) compared with neoadjuvant gemcitabine + cisplatin and RC + PLND (Arm B).
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Vactosertib With Durvalumab in Urothelial Carcinoma Failing Checkpoint Inhibition

    This is Phase 2, open label, non randomized single arm study to determine whether the administration of vactosertib with durvalumab will provide meaningful increases in the Overall Response Rate (ORR) in patients with urothelial cancers that fail to achieve a response with anti-PD-1 / PD-L1 based regimens
    Location: 2 locations

  • sEphB4-HSA in Treating Participants with BCG-Unresponsive or Refractory Bladder Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein (sEphB4-HSA), and to see how well it works in treating participants with bladder cancer that has come back or that isn't responding to bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine treatment. sEphB4-HAS prevents tumor cells from multiplying and blocks several compounds that promote the growth of blood vessels that bring nutrients to the tumor. Giving sEphB4-HSA may work better in treating participants with bladder cancer.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Risk Enabled Therapy after Neoadjuvant Immunochemotherapy for the Treatment of Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the effect of nivolumab when given together with chemotherapy drugs in treating patients with muscle invasive bladder cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Chemotherapy drugs, such as the accelerated methotrexate / vinblastine / adriamycin / cisplatin (AMVAC) regimen, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Nivolumab in combination with the AMVAC chemotherapy regimen may help patients avoid or delay surgery and improve the quality of life and long term survival of patients with bladder cancer.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Durvalumab with or without Oleclumab before Surgery in Treating Patients with Bladder Urothelial Carcinoma

    This phase I trial studies how well durvalumab with or without oleclumab works in treating patients with bladder urothelial carcinoma when given before standard of care surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and oleclumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 3 locations


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