Treatment Clinical Trials for Bladder Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for bladder cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 126-147 of 147
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  • Trigriluzole with Nivolumab and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable Solid Malignancies or Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of trigriluzole in combination with nivolumab and pembrolizumab in treating patients with solid malignancies or lymphoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Trigriluzole may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving trigriluzole in combination with nivolumab and pembrolizumab may work better at treating patients with solid malignancies or lymphoma.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Stage II-IV Muscle-Invasive Bladder, Urethra, or Ureter Cancer That Have Undergone Chemoradiotherapy

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab works in treating patients with stage II-IV muscle-invasive bladder, urethra, or ureter cancer that have undergone chemoradiotherapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Huntsman Cancer Institute / University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah

  • Trial of CRLX101, a Nanoparticle Camptothecin With Olaparib in People With Relapsed / Refractory Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Background: CRLX101 consists of a sugar molecule cyclodextrin linked to a chemotherapy drug called camptothecin. The combined molecule or nanoparticle drug conjugate travels through the blood. Once inside cancer cells, the chemotherapy drug is released from the molecule. Olaparib is a drug that may stop cancer cells from repairing the DNA damage caused by chemotherapy. Researchers want to see how safe it is to give CRLX101 and olaparib together and to see how well the combination treats a specific type of lung cancer called small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Objectives: To test the safety and maximum dose of CLRX101 and olaparib together. To test how well they treat small cell lung cancer. Eligibility: Adults 18 and older with small cell lung cancer. Design: Participants will be screened with standard cancer care tests. Participants will get the 2 study drugs in 28-day cycles. CRLX101 will be given every 2 weeks, through a small plastic tube in an arm vein. Olaparib will be taken by mouth twice a day most days. Participants will keep a pill diary. For Cycle 1, participants will have 3 visits. All other cycles will have 2 visits. At study visits, participants may have: Blood and hair samples taken History and Physical exam Questions about health and side effects Pregnancy test Optional tumor biopsy where a piece of tumor is removed by needle after numbing the skin. . CT scan Injection of CRLX101 (twice per cycle) Olaparib prescription Participants will have a follow-up visit 4 weeks after finish taking the drugs. They will have a physical exam and blood tests. They may have a tumor biopsy. The study team will call the patient every 3 months for follow up after completing the study treatment.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • sEphB4-HSA before Surgery in Treating Patients with Bladder Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Kidney Cancer

    This phase I clinical trial studies the side effects of recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein before surgery in treating patients with transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder, prostate cancer, or kidney cancer. Recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein may block an enzyme needed for tumor cells to multiply and may also prevent the growth of new blood vessels that bring nutrients to the tumor. Giving recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Patients with HER2 Amplified or Mutant Advanced Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab emtansine works in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) amplified or HER2 mutant cancers, including lung and bladder, that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced). Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab emtansine, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • The Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Antitumor Activity of BGB-A317 in Combination With BGB-290 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors

    The Safety, Pharmacokinetics and Antitumor Activity of the Anti-PD-1 Monoclonal Antibody BGB-A317 in Combination With the PARP Inhibitor BGB-290 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors
    Location: 4 locations

  • 3D Conformal Radiation Therapy after Surgery in Treating Patients with High-Risk Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiation therapy after surgery works in treating patients with high-risk bladder cancer. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Dovitinib Lactate in Treating Patients With Refractory or Stage 0-I Bladder Cancer With FGFR3 Mutations or Overexpression

    This phase II trial studies how well giving dovitinib lactate works in treating patients with refractory or stage 0-I bladder cancer with fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) mutations or overexpression. Dovitinib lactate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study Combining Eribulin Mesylate With Avelumab in Cisplatin Ineligible Metastatic Urothelial Cell Cancer Patients

    This is a single arm, open-label phase Ib study of combining eribulin mesylate with avelumab. The initial 9-12 patients (MTD cohort) will be enrolled to determine safety of avelumab in combination with eribulin mesylate. Upon determination of maximum tolerated dose (MTD), 12 additional patients will be enrolled in an expansion cohort (efficacy cohort) to determine ORR at 6 months.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Proliposomal Intravesical Paclitaxel for Treatment of Low-Grade, Stage Ta, Non-Muscle Invasive Bladder Cancer

    This is a single-arm, phase 1 / 2a study of formulated paclitaxel in subjects with low-grade, noninvasive papillary carcinoma (stage Ta) of the bladder. Part 1 of the study will enroll 6 subjects (3 per cohort) with low-grade, stage Ta transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder who will receive escalating doses of paclitaxel formulated as TSD-001 every 2 weeks for 6 treatments until Dose Limiting Toxicity (or until the Maximum Deliverable Dose) is observed (Maximum Tolerated Dose established). Part 2 of the study will enroll an additional 10 subjects with low-grade, stage Ta (uni-or multifocal) TCC of the bladder who will receive weekly TSD-001 for 6 weeks at the highest nontoxic dose (i.e., MTD) established in part 1 of the study. May meet definition of low grade without histological tissue diagnosis if on cystoscopic assessment they have a solitary papillary tumor. Part 3 of the study will continue to track subjects enrolled in Parts 1 and 2 to determine rates of disease-free survival.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Study of MEDI4736 (Durvalumab) With or Without Tremelimumab Versus Standard of Care Chemotherapy in Urothelial Cancer

    A Phase III, Randomized, Open-Label, Controlled, Multi-Center, Global Study of First-Line MEDI4736 (Durvalumab) Monotherapy and MEDI4736 (Durvalumab) in Combination with Tremelimumab Versus Standard of Care Chemotherapy in Patients with Stage IV Urothelial Cancer
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Cisplatin, and Ipilimumab as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well gemcitabine hydrochloride, cisplatin, and ipilimumab work as first-line therapy in treating patients with metastatic urothelial cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of tumors to grow and spread. Other find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Giving gemcitabine hydrochloride and cisplatin together with ipilimumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Tesetaxel for Previously Treated Patients With Bladder Cancer

    The intravenously administered taxanes, docetaxel and paclitaxel, alone and in combination with other chemotherapy agents are active in patients with advanced and metastatic bladder cancer, and agents of this class are a promising treatment option for some patients. Tesetaxel is an orally administered taxane that is in development as treatment for subjects with advanced cancers. This study is being conducted to determine the efficacy and safety of tesetaxel administered to patients previously treated with chemotherapy for progressive metastatic transitional cell carcinoma of the urothelium.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Study of Nivolumab Plus NKTR-214 vs Nivolumab Alone vs Standard of Care in Participants With Bladder Cancer That Has Invaded the Muscle Wall of the Bladder and Who Cannot Get Cisplatin, a Type of Medicine Given to Treat Bladder Cancer.

    The purpose of the study is to see if treatment with nivolumab plus NKTR-214 or nivolumab alone, before and after surgery to remove the bladder, is more effective than surgery alone in participants with muscle-invasive bladder cancer who are not able to receive cisplatin chemotherapy.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • A Phase I-II, First-in-Human Study of SKB264 in Patients With Locally Advanced / Metastatic Solid Tumors Who Are Refractory to Available Standard Therapies

    A Phase I-II, First-in-Human Study of SKB264 in Patients with Locally Advanced / Metastatic Solid Tumors who are refractory to Available Standard Therapies. Patient must have historically documented, incurable, locally advanced or metastatic cancer that are refractory to standard therapies of one of the following types: i. Ovarian epithelial cancer (Phase I only) ii. Gastric adenocarcinoma (Phase I-II) iii. Pancreatic adenocarcinoma (Phase I-II) iv. Triple negative breast cancer (Phase I only) v. Bladder cancer (Phase I-II)
    Location: 2 locations

  • Vaccine Response With NT-I7

    Background: People with cancer, and especially older people, have a weakened immune system (the defense system of the body). This is often caused by the treatments for cancer. Older cancer survivors are therefore more prone to getting infections, some of which are preventable through vaccines. But because their immune systems are weakened, their response to vaccines is poor. Researchers want to see if a new drug, NT-17, can help. Objective: To see if NT-I7 can boost the immune system. Eligibility: Adults 60 and older who have recently finished chemotherapy for breast, colorectal, or bladder cancer. Design: Participants will be screened with a physical exam, medical history, and blood and urine samples. Their heart s electrical activity will be checked. They will have an ultrasound of their spleen. They may give a tissue sample from a previous biopsy. Participants in phase 1a of the study will get 1 dose of NT-I7. It will be given by injection with a needle into the muscle of the upper arm, thigh, or buttocks. Participants in phase 1b will get 5 vaccines over a few months. They may get an optional booster and / or 6th vaccine. They will also get NT-17. Participants will repeat the screening tests during the study. They may get a peripheral intravenous catheter in a vein in their hand or arm for blood draws. Participants may have apheresis. For this, blood is taken from an arm vein. The white blood cells are separated from the blood. The rest of the blood, minus the white blood cells, is returned into a vein in the other arm. A catheter may be used. Participants will have follow-up visits for 1 year.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • sEphB4-HSA in Treating Participants with BCG-Unresponsive or Refractory Bladder Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of recombinant EphB4-HSA fusion protein (sEphB4-HSA), and to see how well it works in treating participants with bladder cancer that has come back or that isn't responding to bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine treatment. sEphB4-HAS prevents tumor cells from multiplying and blocks several compounds that promote the growth of blood vessels that bring nutrients to the tumor. Giving sEphB4-HSA may work better in treating participants with bladder cancer.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Rucaparib in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma

    The purpose of the ATLAS study is to determine how patients with locally advanced unresectable or metastatic urothelial carcinoma respond to treatment with rucaparib.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Atezolizumab and Guadecitabine in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and best dose of atezolizumab and guadecitabine and how well they work in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Guadecitabine may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving atezolizumab and guadecitabine together may work betting in treating patients with urothelial cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • TAS-102 in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Unresectable or Metastatic Bladder Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well TAS-102 works in treating patients with bladder cancer that has spread to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. TAS-102 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • Atezolizumab with or without Eribulin Mesylate in Treating Patients with Recurrent Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of atezolizumab with or without eribulin mesylate and how well they work in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has come back, spread to nearby tissues and lymph nodes, or other places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as eribulin mesylate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab and eribulin mesylate may work better at treating urothelial cancer.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Cisplatin and Gemcitabine Hydrochloride with or without ATR Kinase Inhibitor M6620 in Treating Patients with Metastatic Urothelial Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cisplatin and gemcitabine hydrochloride with or without ATR kinase inhibitor M6620 works in treating patients with urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and gemcitabine hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. ATR kinase inhibitor M6620 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known if cisplatin and gemcitabine hydrochloride work better alone or with ATR kinase inhibitor M6620 in treating patients with urothelial cancer.
    Location: 36 locations


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