Treatment Clinical Trials for Esophageal Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for esophageal cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 76-100 of 104

  • Gevokizumab With Standard of Care Anti-cancer Therapies for Metastatic Colorectal, Gastroesophageal, and Renal Cancers

    This study will determine the pharmacodynamically-active dose of gevokizumab and the tolerable dose and preliminary efficacy of gevokizumab in combination with the standard of care anti-cancer therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, metastatic gastroesophageal cancer and metastatic renal cell carcinoma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Safety and Tolerability Study of INCAGN02390 in Select Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of INCAGN02390 in participants with select advanced malignancies.
    Location: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey

  • Oral TrkA Inhibitor VMD-928 for Treatment of Advanced Adult Solid Tumors or Lymphoma

    This is a multicenter, open-label, Phase 1 study of orally administered VMD-928 in adult subjects with advanced solid tumors or lymphoma that have progressed or are non responsive to available therapies and for which no standard or available curative therapy exists
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • A First in Human, Dose Escalation Study of JAB-3068 (SHP2 Inhibitor) in Adult Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors

    This is a phase 1, multi-center, dose escalation, open-label study to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and preliminary evidence of antitumor activity of JAB-3068 in adult patients with advanced solid.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Proton Beam Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage II or III Esophageal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well proton beam radiation therapy works in treating patients with stage II or III esophageal cancer. Proton beam radiation therapy uses high energy protons to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors while causing less damage to healthy tissues and organs.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Basket Study to Evaluate the Therapeutic Activity of RO6874281 as a Combination Therapy in Participants With Advanced and / or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This is an open-label, multicenter, basket trial Phase II study to evaluate the antitumor activity of RO6874281 in combination with atezolizumab in participants with advanced and / or metastatic solid tumors. Currently the focus is on patients with Head and Neck, oesophageal and cervical cancers with confirmed squamous cell carcinoma histology type.
    Location: Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, New Jersey

  • Pembrolizumab, Oxaliplatin, Capecitabine as First Line Treatment for Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Esophagus or Stomach Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine work as first-line treatment in treating patients with esophagus or stomach cancer that has come back (recurrent) or spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine may work better in treating patients with esophagus or stomach cancer.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Endoesophageal Brachytherapy Using a 6-Channel Balloon Repositioning, Multichannel Applicator in Treating Participants with Esophageal Carcinoma

    This trial studies how well endoesophageal brachytherapy using a 6-channel balloon repositioning, multichannel applicator works in treating in participants with esophageal carcinoma. A 6-channel balloon repositioning, multichannel applicator may work by making the dose more evenly distributed and reducing "hot spots" of radiation (doses above the prescription dose) in the esophageal wall during radiation therapy.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Oral Decitabine and Tetrahydrouridine as Epigenetic Priming for, Pembrolizumab-Mediated Immune Checkpoint Blockade in Patients With Inoperable, or Unresectable Locally Advanced or Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers and Esophageal Carcinomas

    Background: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Most people with lung cancer are already in the advanced stages of the disease by the time they see a doctor. Researchers want to see if combining an approved drug with two new drugs can help. Objective: To study if tetrahydrouridine-decitabine (THU-DAC) with pembrolizumab is safe and effective in people with non-small cell lung cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Eligibility: People 18 years and older who have NSCLC that cannot be removed by surgery Design: Participants will be screened with - Medical history - Physical exam - Blood and urine tests - Tests of heart and lung function They may have a small tumor sample taken (biopsy). They may have tumor scans. Before starting treatment, participants will repeat the screening tests. They will also give a stool sample. The study will be done in 3-week cycles for up to 6 cycles. - Participants will take the 2 study drugs by mouth 3-5 days a week. - Participants will get pembrolizumab in a vein for 30 minutes 1 day each cycle. Participants will keep a study medication diary. During cycle 1, participants will have blood taken multiple times on days 1 and 2. Every 3 cycles, participants will repeat screening tests. Participants will have a mandatory tumor biopsy. When they finish treatment, participants will have a physical exam and blood tests.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Study Evaluating MM-310 in Patients With Solid Tumors

    MM-310 is a liposomal formulation of a docetaxel prodrug that targets the EphA2 receptor on cancer cells. Docetaxel is an approved chemotherapeutic drug.This study is a Phase 1 open-label study of MM-310 in patients with solid tumors. In the first part of the study, MM-310 will be assessed as a monotherapy until a maximum tolerated dose (MTD) is established. After an MTD of MM-310 as a monotherapy is established, an expansion cohort and MM-310 in combination with other therapies will be assessed.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Continuous 24h Intravenous Infusion of Mithramycin, an Inhibitor of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling, in People With Primary Thoracic Malignancies or Carcinomas, Sarcomas or Germ Cell Neoplasms With Pleuropulmonary Metastases

    Background: Mithramycin is a new cancer drug. In another study, people with chest cancer took the drug 6 hours a day for 7 straight days. Many of them had liver damage as a side effect. It was discovered that only people with certain genes got this side effect. Researchers want to test mithramycin in people who do not have those certain genes. Objectives: To find the highest safe dose of mithramycin that can be given to people with chest cancer who have certain genes over 24 hours instead of spread out over a longer period of time. To see if mithramycin given as a 24-hour infusion shrinks tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have chest cancer that is not shrinking with known therapies, and whose genes will limit the chance of liver damage from mithramycin Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and urine tests Lung and heart function tests X-rays or scans of their tumor Liver ultrasound Tumor biopsy Participants will be admitted to the hospital overnight. A small plastic tube (catheter) will be inserted in the arm or chest. They will get mithramycin through the catheter over about 24 hours. If they do not have bad side effects or their cancer does not worsen, they can repeat the treatment every 14 days. Participants will have multiple visits for each treatment cycle. These include repeats of certain screening tests. After stopping treatment, participants will have weekly visits until they recover from any side effects.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Combined Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of a combined vaccine therapy and to see how well it works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). The cancer vaccine is made up of two proteins (that look like the tumor cells) mixed up with a special compound that may help train and boost the immune system to recognize and fight the tumor cells.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • A Study of BBI608 Administered With Paclitaxel in Adult Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    This is an open label, single arm phase 1 dose escalation study and phase 2 study of BBI608 in combination with paclitaxel in patients with advanced malignancies. Currently the study is only enrolling patients with thymic carcinoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Dose Escalation of DF6002 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, and Expansion in Selected Indications

    This study is a Phase 1 / 2, open-label, dose-escalation study with a consecutive parallel-group efficacy expansion study, designed to determine the safety, tolerability, PK, pharmacodynamics, and preliminary anti-tumor activity of DF6002 as monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Combination Immunotherapy in Subjects With Advanced HPV Associated Malignancies

    Background: More than 30,000 cases of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers occur annually in the United States. When these cancers spread, they do not respond well to standard treatments and are often incurable. Researchers want to see if a mix of drugs can help. Objective: To learn if a mix of immunotherapy drugs can shrink tumors in people with HPV associated cancers. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with locally advanced or metastatic HPV associated cancer, such as cervical cancers; P16+ oropharyngeal cancers; anal cancers; vulvar, vaginal, penile, and squamous cell rectal cancers; or other locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors (e.g., lung, esophagus) that are known HPV+ cancers Design: Participants will be screened with: - medical history - disease confirmation (or tumor biopsy) - physical exam - body scans (CT, MRI, and / or nuclear) - blood tests - electrocardiogram (to measure the electrical activity of the heart) - urine tests. Participants will get PDS0101 injected under the skin every 4 weeks for 6 doses. Then they will get it every 3 months for 2 doses. Participants will get M7824 by intravenous infusion every 2 weeks. For this, a needle is inserted into a vein. The drug is given over a 1-hour period. Participants will get NHS-IL12 injected under the skin every 4 weeks. Participants will get the study drugs for up to 1 year. They will visit the NIH every 2 weeks. They will repeat the screening tests during the study. About 28 days after treatment ends, participants will have a follow-up visit or telephone call. Then they will be contacted every 3 months for 1 year, and then every 6 months after that, for the rest of their life....
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Sintilimab or Placebo With Chemotherapy in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    This is a randomized, double-blind multi-center, phase III study comparing the efficacy and safety of sintilimab or placebo in combination with chemotherapy as first-line treatment in subjects with unresectable, locally advanced recurrent or metastatic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.
    Location: UC Irvine Health / Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Orange, California

  • Study of Romiplostim for Chemo-induced Thrombocytopenia in Adults Subjects With Gastrointestinal or Colorectal Cancer

    Study of Romiplostim for Chemotherapy-induced Thrombocytopenia in Adult Subjects with Gastrointestinal or Colorectal Cancer
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • Capecitabine / Tesetaxel Versus Capecitabine / Placebo as Second-line Therapy for Gastric Cancer

    This study is being performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of capecitabine in combination with tesetaxel versus capecitabine in combination with placebo as second-line treatment for patients with gastric cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • A Study to Evaluate Enfortumab Vedotin in Subjects With Previously Treated Locally Advanced or Metastatic Malignant Solid Tumors (EV-202)

    The primary purpose of this study is to determine the antitumor activity of enfortumab vedotin as measured by confirmed objective response rate (ORR). This study will also assess other measures of antitumor activity; overall survival (OS); as well as the safety and tolerability of enfortumab vedotin.
    Location: 4 locations

  • This Study is to Evaluate Safe and Effective Treatment Dose of OBI-888 in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors.

    The purpose of this study is to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of OBI-888 as monotherapy. And to characterize the safety and preliminary clinical activity profile of the MTD dose of OBI-888 administered as monotherapy in patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Testing the Addition of the Anti-cancer Viral Therapy Telomelysin to Chemoradiation for Patients with Advanced Esophageal Cancer and Are Not Candidates for Surgery

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of Telomelysin when given together with carboplatin, paclitaxel, and radiation therapy in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Telomelysin is a virus that has been designed to infect and destroy tumor cells (although there is a small risk that it can also infect normal cells). Chemotherapy drugs, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving Telomelysin with chemotherapy and radiation therapy may work better than standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal cancer.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • HPV Vaccine PRGN-2009 Alone or in Combination With Anti-PDL1 / TGF-Beta Trap (M7824) in Subjects With HPV Associated Cancers

    Background: For some cancers associated with human papillomavirus (HPV), standard treatments are not helpful. Researchers want to see if a vaccine for HPV combined with a drug called M7824 has a better effect on these cancers than when they work alone. Objective: To find a safe dose of HPV vaccine alone or combined with M7824. Also, to test if either HPV vaccine alone or combined with M7824 causes a better immune response. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with locally advanced or metastatic HPV associated cancer (Phase I) or stage II or III p16-positive oropharyngeal cancer (Phase II) Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood, urine, and heart tests Possible photos of skin lesions CT, MRI, or nuclear bone scan: Participants will lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. For the CT scan, they may have a contrast agent injected into a vein. Participants may have up to 2 tumor biopsies. For participants in Phase II, this may be performed with a thin tube placed through the nose into the airway. Participants will receive the HPV vaccine alone or with M7824. For participants on the Phase II, they will receive two doses of HPV vaccine under the skin either alone or with M7824 as an infusion spaced two weeks apart. This will be done prior to their planned chemoradiation or surgery. For participants on the Phase I, they will get the HPV vaccine injected under the skin 2 to 3 times in the first month. Then they will have a booster every 4 weeks. They will receive M7824 as an infusion into a vein every 2 weeks. Treatment will last up to 1 year. After they stop treatment, participants will have a visit within 4 weeks. They will then be contacted for long-term follow-up every year, for the rest of their lives. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Tucatinib Plus Trastuzumab and Oxaliplatin-based Chemotherapy for HER2+ Gastrointestinal Cancers

    This trial studies tucatinib to find out if it is safe when given with trastuzumab and other anti-cancer drugs (FOLFOX). It will look at what side effects happen when participants take this combination of drugs. A side effect is anything the drug does other than treating cancer. The participants in this trial have HER2-positive (HER2+) cancer in their gut, stomach, intestines, or gallbladder (gastrointestinal cancer).
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, BAY 1895344, to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Cisplatin, or Cisplatin and Gemcitabine) for Advanced Solid Tumors with Emphasis on Urothelial Cancer

    This phase I trial investigates the best dose and side effects of BAY 1895344 when given together with chemotherapy in treating patients with solid tumors or urothelial cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). BAY 1895344 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin and gemcitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this trial is to test the safety of a drug called BAY 1895344 in combination with the usual chemotherapy treatment (cisplatin, or cisplatin and gemcitabine) for the treatment of advanced solid tumors, including urothelial cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Testing the Addition of an Anti-cancer Drug, Adavosertib, to Radiation Therapy for Patients with Incurable Esophageal and Gastroesophageal Junction Cancers

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects and best dose of adavosertib and how well it works when given in combination with radiation therapy in treating patients with esophageal or gastroesophageal junction cancer for which no treatment is currently available (incurable). Adavosertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving adavosertib together with radiation therapy kill more tumor cells than radiation therapy alone in treating patients with esophageal and gastroesophageal junction cancer.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.