Treatment Clinical Trials for Multiple Myeloma

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for multiple myeloma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 226-235 of 235
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  • Loratadine for the Reduction of G-CSF Induced Bone Pain in Patients with Multiple Myeloma Undergoing Stem Cell Mobilization

    This early phase I trial studies how well loratadine works in reducing granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) induced bone pain in patients with multiple myeloma who are undergoing stem cell mobilization. Loratadine is an antihistamine that may help to reduce or control bone pain during the process of stem cell collection in patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey

  • Lenalidomide with or without Carfilzomib and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma after Stem-Cell Transplant

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well lenalidomide with or without carfilzomib and dexamethasone works in treating patients with multiple myeloma after stem-cell transplant. Lenalidomide may help the immune system kill abnormal blood cells or cancer cells. It may also prevent the growth of new blood vessels that tumors need to grow. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Dexamethasone is a drug used to reduce inflammation and lower the body’s immune response. Giving lenalidomide together with carfilzomib and dexamethasone may be an effective treatment for multiple myeloma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study Evaluating Venetoclax (ABT-199) in Multiple Myeloma Subjects Who Are Receiving Bortezomib and Dexamethasone as Standard Therapy

    This is a Phase 3, multicenter, randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled study evaluating the efficacy and safety of venetoclax plus bortezomib and dexamethasone in subjects with relapsed or refractory multiple myeloma who are considered sensitive or naïve to proteasome inhibitors and received 1 to 3 prior lines of therapy for multiple myeloma.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Ibrutinib, Lenalidomide, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma Ineligible for Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose and side effects of ibrutinib when given together with lenalidomide and dexamethasone and how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that are not eligible for transplant. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ibrutinib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida

  • Abbreviated Mycophenolate Mofetil and Sargramostim after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High Risk or Recurrent Hematological Malignancies

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well a shortened course of treatment with mycophenolate mofetil after stem cell transplant works when given with sargramostim in treating patients with a cancer that affects the blood or bone marrow (hematological malignancy), and is at high risk for returning or came back after previous treatment (recurrent). Graft versus host disease (GVHD) is a condition that may occur after transplant, in which the stem cells that are transplanted from a donor (the "graft") attack the normal cells of the patient (the “host”). Mycophenolate mofetil is used to help prevent GVHD after transplants. Giving mycophenolate mofetil for a shorter period of time may help the transplanted cells engraft with the patient's body more quickly, which may help the patient recover after the transplant. After transplants, colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim, are also given to help keep the bone marrow working to fight infections until it can recover from the transplant. Sargramostim may be a more effective treatment for supporting the bone marrow function than standard treatment with filgrastim. It is not yet known whether giving abbreviated treatment with mycophenolate mofetil and sargramostim is more effective than longer treatment given with filgrastim in treating patients with high risk or recurrent hematological malignancies after transplant.
    Location: Virginia Commonwealth University / Massey Cancer Center, Richmond, Virginia

  • Elotuzumab and Lenalidomide after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies how well elotuzumab works when given with lenalidomide as maintenance therapy after transplant in patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma who underwent transplant using their own stem cells (autologous transplant). Maintenance therapy is treatment that is given to help keep cancer from coming back after it has disappeared following the initial treatment. Elotuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide, may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Adding elotuzumab to standard maintenance therapy with lenalidomide may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma who have undergone transplant.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Venetoclax, Ixazomib Citrate, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of venetoclax when given together with ixazomib citrate and dexamethasone and to see how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back. Venetoclax and ixazomib citrate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving venetoclax together with ixazomib citrate and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Elotuzumab, Carfilzomib, Lenalidomide, and Low Dose Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well elotuzumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and low dose dexamethasone work in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving elotuzumab, carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Survivin Vaccine: Multiple Myeloma Autologous Hematopoietic Cell Transplant (HCT)

    This early phase I studies the side effects of dendritic cell survivin vaccine and how well it works in treating patients with multiple myeloma who are undergoing stem cell transplant. Vaccines made from a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill cancer cells.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Depleted Immune Suppressor Stem Cell Transplant in Enhancing Immune Response to Vaccines in Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This pilot, randomized phase II trial studies how well depleted immune suppressor stem cell transplant works compared to standard stem cell transplant in enhancing immune response to vaccines in patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Chemotherapy and the patient's own stem cells are effective in treating MM, however there is a risk of disease returning due to poor recovery of the immune system as shown to poor response to vaccines to prevent infections. Before chemotherapy, patients' stem cells are collected and certain immune cells called suppressor cells are removed from the stem cells. Patients then receive chemotherapy to kill cancer cells and after that the immune depleted stem cells are returned to them to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy. Giving depleted immune suppressor stem cells transplant to patients with MM may result in a more robust immune response to vaccines after transplant and may prevent MM from returning. It is not yet known whether depleted immune suppressor stem cell transplant is more effective than standard stem cell transplant in enhancing immune response to vaccines in patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: University of Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska


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