Clinical Trials Using 6,8-Bis(benzylthio)octanoic Acid

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying 6,8-Bis(benzylthio)octanoic Acid. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • Study Evaluating Efficacy and Safety of CPI-613 in Combination With HD Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone Compared to HD Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone and Control Sub-groups: MEC and FLAG in Older Patients With R / R AML

    A Phase III study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of CPI-613® (devimistat) in combination with High Dose Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone in comparison with high dose Cytarabine and Mitoxantrone and control sub-groups: combination of Mitoxantrone, Etoposide and Cytarabine (MEC) and combination of Fludarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim (FLAG) in older patients with relapsed / refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia. CPI-613® (devimistat) targets the altered energy metabolism and processes for production of ATP and essential bio-intermediates unique to and characteristic of most cancer cell types. The addition of CPI-613® (devimistat) to high dose cytarabine and mitoxantrone (CHAM) will improve the complete remission (CR) rate in patients 50 years or older with relapsed or refractory AML when compared to HAM alone or other control sub groups.
    Location: 12 locations

  • CPI-613 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Burkitt Lymphoma / Leukemia or High-Grade B-cell Lymphoma with MYC, BCL2, and / or BCL6 Gene Rearrangements

    This phase II trial studies how well CPI-613 works in treating patients with Burkitt lymphoma / leukemia or high-grade B-cell lymphoma with MYC, BCL2, and / or BCL6 gene rearrangements that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). CPI-613 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 11 locations

  • CPI-613 and Bendamustine for the Treatment of Relapsed or Refractory T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of CPI-613 and bendamustine in treating patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). CPI-613 kills cancer cells by turning off their mitochondria. Mitochondria are used by cancer cells to produce energy and are the building blocks needed to make more cancer cells. By shutting off these mitochondria, CPI-613 deprives the cancer cells of energy and other supplies that they need to survive and grow in the body. Chemotherapy drugs, such as bendamustine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CPI-613 in combination with bendamustine may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina

  • Gemcitabine and Cisplatin with or without Devimistat as First Line Therapy for the Treatment of Advanced Unresectable Biliary Tract Cancer, BilT-04 Trial

    This phase IB / II trial investigates the side effects and best dose of devimistat and how well it works with gemcitabine and cisplatin as initial treatment (first-line therapy) for patients with biliary tract cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Devimistat may kill tumor cells by turning off their mitochondria. Mitochondria are used by tumor cells to produce energy and are the building blocks needed to make more tumor cells. By shutting off these mitochondria, devimistat may deprive the tumor cells of energy and other supplies that they need to survive and grow in the body. Chemotherapy drugs, such as gemcitabine and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving devimistat with gemcitabine and cisplatin may kill more tumor cells than giving only gemcitabine and cisplatin.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • CPI-613 and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the best dose of CPI-613 and how well it works with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with pancreatic cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes (locally advanced). CPI-613 inhibits energy production in cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, irinotecan hydrochloride, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving CPI-613 and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with pancreatic cancer.
    Location: Case Comprehensive Cancer Center, Cleveland, Ohio

  • CPI-613 and Hydroxychloroquine in Treating Patients with Recurrent High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of hydroxychloroquine and how well CPI-613 and hydroxychloroquine work in treating patients with high risk myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back after hypomethylating therapy. CPI-613 is thought to kill cancer cells by turning off their mitochondria. Mitochondria are used by cells to produce energy and are the building blocks needed to make more cells. By shutting off these mitochondria, CPI-613 deprives the cells of energy and other supplies that they need to survive and grow in your body. Hydroxychloroquine is an antimalarial drug. Hydroxychloroquine may make CPI-613 more effective in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: 2 locations

  • CPI-613 in Treating Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome Who Failed Previous Therapy

    This phase II pilot trial studies how well 6, 8-bis (benzylthio) octanoic acid (CPI-613) works in treating patients with myelodysplastic syndrome who failed previous therapy. Sometimes when chemotherapy or biological therapy is given, it does not stop the growth of tumor cells. The tumor is said to be resistant to treatment. 6, 8-bis (benzylthio) octanoic acid may interfere with the growth of cancer cells and may be an effective treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome that did not respond to previous therapy.
    Location: Wake Forest University Health Sciences, Winston-Salem, North Carolina