Clinical Trials Using Abemaciclib

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Abemaciclib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-35 of 35

  • Fulvestrant and Abemaciclib in Treating Patients with Stage III- IV Low Grade Serous Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well fulvestrant and abemaciclib work in treating patients with stage III-IV low grade serous ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer. Fulvestrant and abemaciclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Abemaciclib in Treating Patients with Rb Positive Triple-Negative Breast Cancer That is Recurrent, Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well abemaciclib works in treating patients with retinoblastoma (Rb) positive triple-negative breast cancer that has come back (recurrent), has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), or cannot be removed by surgery. Abemaciclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

  • A Study of Anti-PD-L1 Checkpoint Antibody (LY3300054) Alone and in Combination in Participants With Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors

    The main purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety and tolerability of anti-programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) checkpoint antibody LY3300054 in participants with advanced refractory solid tumors.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Abemaciclib with or without T-DM1 for the Treatment of HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well abemaciclib with or without T-DM1 works for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Abemaciclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. T-DM1 is a monoclonal antibody, called trastuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called DM1. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers DM1 to kill them. Giving abemaciclib and T-DM1 may work better in treating patients with breast cancer compared to abemaciclib or T-DM1 alone.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Neo-adjuvant Abemaciclib with Fulvestrant for the Treatment of Hormone Receptor Positive Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well abemaciclib and fulvestrant work before surgery (neo-adjuvant) in treating patients with hormone receptor positive stage I-III breast cancer that has come back in the breast and has not spread to other distant organs (localized non-metastatic breast cancer) and demonstrates resistance to endocrine therapy. Abemaciclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast tumor cells. Fulvestrant may help fight breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen by the tumor cells. Abemaciclib and fulvestrant may destroy as much cancer as possible that will allow a complete pathologic response to be achieved. A complete pathologic response is defined as the absence of breast cancer in the breast and / or the axillary (a person's armpit) lymph nodes in the surgical specimen.
    Location: UC Irvine Health / Chao Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, Orange, California

  • Abemaciclib and Letrozole in Treating Patients with Endometrial Cancer

    This early phase I trial studies how well abemaciclib and letrozole work in treating patients with endometrial cancer and determines whether there are changes in patients' cancer cell biomarkers (a genetic feature or specific protein) for cell growth before and after treatment. Antihormone therapy with aromatase inhibitors, such as letrozole, may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body. Abemaciclib blocks the activities of a class of proteins called cyclin-dependent kinase, which are involved in cell duplication. Giving letrozole and abemaciclib together may slow down cancer cell growth in patients with endometrial cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of LY3499446 in Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors With KRAS G12C Mutation

    The reason for this study is to see if the study drug LY3499446 is safe and effective in participants with solid tumors with KRAS G12C mutation.
    Location: 4 locations

  • A Study of Abemaciclib (LY2835219) in Combination With Fulvestrant Compared to Chemotherapy in Women With HR Positive, HER2 Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer

    The reason for this study is to compare the efficacy of abemaciclib, in combination with fulvestrant, to that of physician's choice of chemotherapy in women with hormone receptor-positive (HR+), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative (HER2-) metastatic breast cancer that has spread to internal organs. Your participation in this trial could last up to 31 months, depending on your cancer type and how you and your tumor respond.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Vismodegib, FAK Inhibitor GSK2256098, Capivasertib, and Abemaciclib in Treating Patients with Progressive Meningiomas

    This phase II trial studies how well vismodegib, focal adhesion kinase (FAK) inhibitor GSK2256098, and capivasertib work in treating patients with meningioma that is growing, spreading, or getting worse (progressive). Vismodegib, FAK inhibitor GSK2256098, capivasertib, and abemaciclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 546 locations

  • Implantable Microdevice for the Evaluation of Drug Response in Patients with Primary Brain Tumors

    This early phase I trial studies the feasibility and safety of an implantable microdevice for the evaluation of drug response in patients with primary brain tumors. Brain tumors are known to be very different from each other and respond differently to different drugs. It would be very helpful to find out what drugs have the best chance of working in each specific tumor. This research study involves drugs that are released by a small device, as small as the tip of a needle, that is inserted by a neurosurgeon into the tumor at the time of surgery and is then removed by the end of the surgery. The goal of this research study is to prove that these small devices can be used to find out which drugs have better effects on treating tumors.
    Location: 2 locations