Clinical Trials Using Aldesleukin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Aldesleukin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-42 of 42

  • Autologous CD8+ SLC45A2-Specific T Lymphocytes with Cyclophosphamide, Aldesleukin, and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of autologous CD8 positive (+) SLC45A2-specific T lymphocytes when given together with cyclophosphamide, aldesleukin, and ipilimumab, and to see how well they work in treating patients with uveal melanoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). To make specialized CD8+ T cells, researchers separate out T cells collected from patients' blood and treat them so they are able to target melanoma cells. The blood cells are then given back to the patients. This is known as "adoptive T cell transfer" or "adoptive T cell therapy." Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, may work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Biological therapies, such as aldesleukin, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving autologous CD8+ SLC45A2-specific T lymphocytes together with cyclophosphamide, aldesleukin, and ipilimumab may work better in treating patients with metastatic uveal melanoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • E7 TCR T Cells for Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cancers

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause cervical, throat, anal, and genital cancers. Cancers caused by HPV have a HPV protein called E7 inside of their cells. In this new therapy, researchers take a person s blood, remove certain white blood cells, and insert genes that make them to target cancer cells that have the E7 protein. The genetically changed cells, called E7 TCR cells, are then given back to the person to fight the cancer. Researchers want to see if this can help people. Objective: To determine a safe dose and efficacy of E7 TCR cells and whether these cells can help patients. Eligibility: Adults ages 18 and older with an HPV-16-associated cancer, including cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, or oropharyngeal. Design: Participants will list all their medicines. Participants will have many screening tests, including imaging procedures, heart and lung tests, and lab tests. They will have a large catheter inserted into a vein. Participants will have leukapheresis. Blood will be removed through a needle in the arm. A machine separates the white blood cells. The rest of the blood is returned through a needle in the other arm. The cells will be changed in the lab. Participants will stay in the hospital. Over several days, they will get: Chemotherapy drugs E7 TCR cells Shots or injections to stimulate the cells Participants will be monitored in the hospital up to 12 days. They will get support medicine and have blood and lab tests. Participants will have a clinic visit about 40 days after cell infusion. They will have a physical exam, blood work, scans, and maybe x-rays. Participants will have many follow-up visits with the same procedures. At some visits, they may undergo leukapheresis. Participants will be followed for 15 years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Genetically Modified T-Cells Followed by Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Melanoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically modified T-cells followed by aldesleukin in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma. T-cells are a type of white blood cell that help the body fight infections. Genes that may help the T-cells recognize melanoma cells are placed into the T-cells in the laboratory. Adding these genes to the T cells may help them kill more tumor cells when they are put back in the body. Aldesleukin may enhance this effect by stimulating white blood cells to kill more melanoma cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cytokine-Induced Memory-Like NK Cells in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of activated natural killer (NK) cells and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Giving chemotherapy before a donor natural killer cell infusion may help stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's natural killer cells. Modified natural killer cells may help the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells. Aldesleukin (interleukin-2) may stimulate the white blood cells (including natural killer cells) to kill cancer cells.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Genetically Modified Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes Followed by Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Stage III or Metastatic Melanoma

    This phase I / II trial studies how well genetically modified therapeutic autologous lymphocytes (patient's own white blood cells) followed by aldesleukin work in treating patients with stage III melanoma or melanoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Placing chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) and nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) into lymphocytes (white blood cells) may help the body build an immune response to kill melanoma cells. Aldesleukin may enhance this effect by stimulating white blood cells to kill more melanoma cells. Giving genetically modified therapeutic autologous lymphocytes together with aldesleukin may be a better treatment for melanoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Genetically Engineered T Cells and Low-Dose Aldesleukin After Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically engineered T cells when given together with low-dose aldesleukin after combination chemotherapy in treating patients with metastatic melanoma. Placing a gene that has been created in the laboratory into white blood cells may make the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate the white blood cells to kill melanoma cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving genetically engineered T cells and aldesleukin after combination chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for melanoma.
    Location: Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois

  • Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes and High-Dose Aldesleukin with or without Autologous Dendritic Cells in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin with or without autologous dendritic cells work in treating patients with melanoma that has spread to other areas of the body. Vaccines made from a person's tumor cells and special blood cells (dendritic cells) may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate the white blood cells to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin are more effective when given together with or without dendritic cells in shrinking or slowing the growth of melanoma. The clinical benefits of receiving tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in combination with the B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine / threonine kinase (BRAF) inhibitor will be studied, in patients who have progressive disease (PD) with using the BRAF inhibitor prior to TIL treatment. Leptomeningeal disease (LMD) is unfortunately a common development in patients with melanoma, with an extremely poor prognosis, translating into an overall survival of only weeks. With the novel approach of combining intrathecal TILs and intrathecal interleukin (IL)-2, researchers hope to induce long term disease stabilization or remission of LMD.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Non-Viral TCR Gene Therapy

    Background: A person s white blood cells can be modified in a lab to recognize certain changes in their tumor. Many of these cells are collected from the person, modified, then given back to the person. This may help treat some cancers. Objective: To learn if a person s white blood cells modified with T-cell receptors can cause solid tumors to shrink. Eligibility: People ages 18-70 who have cancer of the gastrointestinal tract, genitourinary tract, ovary, breast, or lung that has spread, or who have glioblastoma. Design: Participants will be screened and have their cells prepared for treatment in another protocol. Participants will be hospitalized one week before treatment. They will stay approximately 3 - 4 weeks after treatment. Participants will get the modified white blood cells and chemotherapy through an IV catheter, which is a small plastic tube inserted in a vein. Participants will take drugs by mouth to prevent infection. They will receive filgrastim as a shot or injection under the skin. Participants will have tests before, during, and after treatment: Heart, blood, and urine tests Chest X-ray Physical exam Scans: They will lie in a machine that takes pictures of the body. Possible apheresis: The participant s blood is removed through a needle in an arm. The blood goes through a machine that removes the white blood cells. The rest of the blood is returned through a needle in the other arm. Participants will have visits about 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. If they are responding to treatment, they will then have visits every 3-6 months for 3 years. Then they will join another study and be followed about 12 more years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a Murine T-Cell Receptor Recognizing the G12D Variant of Mutated RAS in HLA-A*11:01 Patients

    Background: A new cancer therapy takes white blood cells from a person, grows them in a lab, genetically changes them, then gives them back to the person. Researchers think this may help attack tumors in people with certain cancers. It is called gene transfer using anti-KRAS G12D mTCR cells. Objective: To see if anti-KRAS G12D mTCR cells are safe and cause tumors to shrink. Eligibility: Adults ages 18-70 who have cancer with a molecule on the tumors that can be recognized by the study cells Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, scans, photography, and heart, lung, and lab tests. An intravenous (IV) catheter will be placed in a large vein in the chest. Participants will have leukapheresis. Blood will be removed through a needle in an arm. A machine will divide the blood and collect white blood cells. The rest of the blood will be returned to the participant through a needle in the other arm. A few weeks later, participants will have a hospital stay. They will: - Get 2 chemotherapy medicines by IV over 5 days. - Get the changed cells through the catheter. Get up to 9 doses of a medicine to help the cells. They may get a shot to stimulate blood cells. - Recover in the hospital for up to 3 weeks. They will provide blood samples. Participants will take an antibiotic for at least 6 months. Participants will have several follow-up visits over 2 years. They will repeat most of the screening tests and may have leukapheresis. Participants blood will be collected for several years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Modified T Cells, Chemotherapy, and Aldesleukin with or without LV305 in Treating Participants with Advanced or Recurrent Sarcoma

    This phase I trial studies how well autologous NY-ESO-1-specific CD8-positive T lymphocytes (modified T lymphocytes [T cells]), chemotherapy, and aldesleukin with or without dendritic cell-targeting lentiviral vector ID-LV305 (LV305) work in treating participants with sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) or that has come back (recurrent). Modified T cells used in this study are taken from participants, are changed in a laboratory, and may "kill" some types of tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Cyclophosphamide may help the body get ready to receive the modified T cells. Interleukins, such as aldesleukin, are proteins made by white blood cells and other cells in the body and may help regulate immune response. LV305 may help stimulate the immune system. Giving modified T cells, chemotherapy, aldesleukin, and LV305 may work better in treating participants with sarcoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Administration of Autologous T-Cells Genetically Engineered to Express T-Cell Receptors Reactive Against Neoantigens in People With Metastatic Cancer

    Background: A person s tumor is studied for mutations. When cells are found that can attack the mutation in a person s tumor, the genes from those cells are studied to find the parts that make the attack possible. White blood cells are then taken from the person s body, and the gene transfer occurs in a laboratory. A type of virus is used to transfer the genes that make those white blood cells able to attack the mutation in the tumor. The gene transfer therapy is the return of those white blood cells back to the person. Objective: To see if gene transfer therapy of white blood cells can shrink tumors. Eligibility: People with certain metastatic cancer for which standard treatments have not worked. Design: Participants may complete screening under another protocol. Screening includes: - Getting tumor cells from a previous procedure - Medical history - Physical exam - Scans - Blood, urine, heart, and lung tests The study has 8 stages: 1. Screening tests repeated over 1-2 weeks. Participants will have leukapheresis: Blood is removed by a needle in one arm. A machine removes white blood cells. The rest of the blood is returned by a needle in the other arm. 2. Care at home over approximately 12 weeks. 3. Stopping therapy for 4-6 weeks while their cells are changed in a lab. 4. Hospital stay approximately 3-4 weeks for treatment. An IV catheter will be placed in the chest to administer drugs. 5. Patients on Arm 2 of the study will receive the first dose of pembrolizumab while in the hospital. Three additional doses will be given after the cell infusion 3 weeks apart. 6. Receiving changed cells by catheter. Then getting a drug over 1-5 days to help the cells live longer. 7. Recover in the hospital for 1-2 weeks. Participants will get drugs and have blood and urine tests. 8. Participants will take an antibiotic and maybe an antiviral for at least 6 months after treatment. They will have repeat screening tests at visits every few months for the first year, every 6 months for the second year, then as determined. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a Murine T-Cell Receptor Recognizing the G12V Variant of Mutated RAS in HLA-A*11:01 Patients

    Background: A new cancer therapy involves taking white blood cells from a person, growing them in the lab, genetically modifying them, then giving them back to the person. This therapy is called gene transfer using anti-KRAS G12V mTCR cells. Objective: To see if anti-KRAS G12 V mTCR cells are safe and can shrink tumors. Eligibility: Adults at least 18 years old with cancer that has the KRAS G12V molecule on the surface of tumors. Design: In another protocol, participants will: Be screened Have cells harvested and grown Have leukapheresis In this protocol, participants will have the procedures below. Participants will be admitted to the hospital. Over 5 days, participants will get 2 chemotherapy medicines as an infusion via catheter in the upper chest. A few days later, participants will get the anti-KRAS G12V mTCR cells via catheter. For up to 3 days, participants will get a drug to make the cells active. A day after getting the cells, participants will get a drug to increase their white blood cell count. This will be a shot or injection under the skin. Participants will recover in the hospital for 1-2 weeks. They will have lab and blood tests. Participants will take an antibiotic for at least 6 months. Participants will have visits every few months for 2 years, and then as determined by their doctor. Visits will be 1-2 days. They will include lab tests, imaging studies, and physical exam. Some visits may include leukapheresis or blood drawn. Participants will have blood collected over several years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a CD70-Binding Chimeric Antigen Receptor to People With CD70 Expressing Cancers

    Background: In a new cancer therapy, researchers take a person s blood, select a certain white blood cell to grow in the lab, and then change the genes of these cells using a virus. The cells are then given back to the person. This is called gene transfer. For this study, researchers will modify the person s white blood cells with anti-CD70. Objectives: To see if a gene transfer with anti-CD70 cells can safely shrink tumors and to be certain the treatment is safe. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older diagnosed with cancer that has the CD70-expressing cancer. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, scans, and other tests. They may by admitted to the hospital. Leukapheresis will be performed. For this, blood is removed through a needle in the arm. A machine separates the white blood cells. The rest of the blood is returned through a needle in the other arm. Eligible participants will have an intravenous catheter placed in their upper chest. Over several days, they will get chemotherapy drugs and the anti-CD70 cells. They will recover in the hospital. Participants will take an antibiotic for 6 months after treatment. They will repeat leukapheresis. Participants will visit the clinic every 1-3 months for the first year after treatment, every 6 months for the second year, and then as determined by their physician. Follow-up visits will take 1-2 days. At each visit, participants will have lab tests, imaging studies, and a physical exam. Throughout the study, blood will be taken and participants will have many tests to determine the size and extent of their tumor and the treatment s impact.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • A Prospective Randomized and Phase 2 Trial for Metastatic Melanoma Using Adoptive Cell Therapy With Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes Plus IL-2 Either Alone or Following the Administration of Pembrolizumab

    Background: Cell therapy is an experimental cancer therapy. It takes young tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (Young TIL) cells from a person s tumors and grows them in a lab. Then they are returned to the person. Researchers think adding the drug pembrolizumab might make the therapy more effective. Objective: To test if adding pembrolizumab to cell therapy is safe and effective to shrink melanoma tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 70 years with metastatic melanoma Design: Participants will be screened with: Physical exam CT, MRI, or PET scans X-rays Heart and lung function tests Blood and urine tests Before treatment, participants will have: A piece of tumor taken from a biopsy or during surgery in order to grow TIL cells Leukapheresis: Blood flows through a needle in one arm and into a machine that removes white blood cells. The rest of the blood returns through a needle in the other arm. An IV catheter placed in the chest for getting TIL cells, aldesleukin, and pembrolizumab (if assigned) Participants will stay in the hospital for treatment. This includes: Daily chemotherapy for 1 week For some participants, pembrolizumab infusion 1 day after chemotherapy TIL cell infusion 2 4 days after chemotherapy, then aldesleukin infusion every 8 hours for up to 12 doses Possible filgrastim injection Recovery for 1 2 weeks After treatment, participants will: Take an antibiotic and antiviral for at least 6 months If assigned, have pembrolizumab treatment every 3 weeks for 3 more doses. They may have another round. Have 2-day follow-up visits every 1 3 months for 1 year and then every 6 months
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • T Cell Receptor Immunotherapy for Patients With Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Background: The NCI Surgery Branch has developed an experimental therapy that involves taking white blood cells from patients' tumors, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. These cells are called Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes, or TIL and we have given this type of treatment to over 100 patients. In this study, we are selecting a specific subset of white blood cells from the tumor that we think are the most effective in fighting tumors and will use only these cells in making the tumor fighting cells. Objective: The purpose of this study is to see if these specifically selected tumor fighting cells can cause non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors to shrink and to see if this treatment is safe. Eligibility: - Adults age 18-70 with NSCLC who have a tumor that can be safely removed. Design: - Work up stage: Patients will be seen as an outpatient at the NIH clinical Center and undergo a history and physical examination, scans, x-rays, lab tests, and other tests as needed - Surgery: If the patients meet all of the requirements for the study they will undergo surgery to remove a tumor that can be used to grow the TIL product. - Leukapheresis: Patients may undergo leukapheresis to obtain additional white blood cells. {Leukapheresis is a common procedure, which removes only the white blood cells from the patient.} - Treatment: Once their cells have grown, the patients will be admitted to the hospital for the conditioning chemotherapy, the TIL cells and aldesleukin. They will stay in the hospital for about 4 weeks for the treatment. Follow up: Patients will return to the clinic for a physical exam, review of side effects, lab tests, and scans about every 1-3 months for the first year, and then every 6 months to 1 year as long as their tumors are shrinking. Follow up visits take up to 2 days.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Immunotherapy Using Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for Patients With Metastatic Cancer

    Background: The NCI Surgery Branch has developed an experimental therapy that involves taking white blood cells from patients' tumors, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. These cells are called Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes, or TIL and we have given this type of treatment to over 200 patients with melanoma. Researchers want to know if TIL shrink s tumors in people with digestive tract, urothelial, breast, or ovarian / endometrial cancers. In this study, we are selecting a specific subset of white blood cells from the tumor that we think are the most effective in fighting tumors and will use only these cells in making the tumor fighting cells. Objective: The purpose of this study is to see if these specifically selected tumor fighting cells can cause digestive tract, urothelial, breast, or ovarian / endometrial tumors to shrink and to see if this treatment is safe. Eligibility: - Adults age 18-70 with upper or lower gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, genitourinary, breast, ovarian / endometrial cancer, or glioblastoma refractory to standard chemotherapy. Design: Work up stage: Patients will be seen as an outpatient at the NIH clinical Center and undergo a history and physical examination, scans, x-rays, lab tests, and other tests as needed. Surgery: If the patients meet all of the requirements for the study they will undergo surgery to remove a tumor that can be used to grow the TIL product. Leukapheresis: Patients may undergo leukapheresis to obtain additional white blood cells. {Leukapheresis is a common procedure, which removes only the white blood cells from the patient.} Treatment: Once their cells have grown, the patients will be admitted to the hospital for the conditioning chemotherapy, the TIL cells and aldesleukin. They will stay in the hospital for about 4 weeks for the treatment. Follow up: Patients will return to the clinic for a physical exam, review of side effects, lab tests, and scans about every 1-3 months for the first year, and then every 6 months to 1 year as long as their tumors are shrinking. Follow up visits will take up to 2 days.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Precise Local Injection of Anti-cancer Drugs Using Presage's CIVO Device in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This is a feasibility study in patients with localized or metastatic soft tissue sarcoma undergoing surgery to determine how sarcoma in situ responds to injected microdoses of anti-cancer therapeutics.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon