Clinical Trials Using Aldesleukin

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Aldesleukin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-50 of 58

  • T-Cell Infusion, Aldesleukin, and Utomilumab in Treating Patients with Recurrent Ovarian Cancer

    This phase I / Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of utomilumab and how well it works with CD8-positive T-lymphocyte (T-cell infusion) and aldesleukin in treating patients with ovarian cancer that has come back. Aldesleukin may stimulate white blood cells to kill ovarian cancer cells. Giving white blood cells (T-cells) that have been activated by a vaccine with aldesleukin may kill more tumor cells. Immunotherapy with utomilumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving T-cell infusion with aldesleukin and utomilumab may work better in treating patients with ovarian cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Aldesleukin and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Kidney Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of aldesleukin when given together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with kidney cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Aldesleukin may stimulate white blood cells to kill kidney cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving aldesleukin and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with kidney cancer.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • TCR-engineered T Cells in Solid Tumors With Emphasis on NSCLC and HNSCC (ACTengine)

    The study purpose is to establish the safety and tolerability of IMA201 in patients with solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Genetically Engineered PBMC and PBSC Expressing NY-ESO-1 TCR after a Myeloablative Conditioning Regimen to Treat Patients with Advanced Cancer

    This phase I clinical trial evaluates the safety and feasibility of administering NY-ESO-1 TCR engineered peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) after a myeloablative conditioning regimen to treat patients with cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. The conditioning chemotherapy makes room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood cells (PBMC) and blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Giving NY-ESO-1 TCR PBMC and stem cells after the conditioning chemotherapy is intended to replace the immune system with new immune cells that have been redirected to attack and kill the cancer cells and thereby improve immune system function against cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Nivolumab, Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes, Chemotherapy, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Stage IV Non-small Lung Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects of nivolumab, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, chemotherapy, and aldesleukin in treating patients with non-small lung cancer that is stage IV or has come back after period of improvement. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes involve the use of special immune cells called T-cells. A T-cell is a type of lymphocyte, or white blood cell. Lymphocytes protect the body from viral infections, help other cells fight bacterial and fungal infections, produce antibodies, fight cancers, and coordinate the activities of other cells in the immune system. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Aldesleukin may help the body respond to treatment on the immune system. Giving nivolumab, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes, chemotherapy, and aldesleukin may work better in treating patients with non-small lung cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Fludarabine, Cyclophosphamide, FATE-NK100 and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Recurrent Ovarian, Fallopian Tube, or Primary Peritoneal Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of allogeneic CD3- CD19- CD57+ NKG2C+ NK cells FATE-NK100 (FATE-NK100) when given together with aldesleukin after fludarabine and cyclophosphamide in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer that has come back. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. FATE-NK100, which is made from cells collected from the blood of a relative who is considered a “donor”, may enhance anti-tumor activity. Aldesleukin may stimulate white blood cells including natural killer cells to kill tumor cells. Giving fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, FATE-NK100, and aldesleukin may work better in treating patients with ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal cancer.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a Murine T-Cell Receptor Recognizing the G12V Variant of Mutated RAS in HLA-A*11:01 Patients

    Background: A new cancer therapy involves taking white blood cells from a person, growing them in the lab, genetically modifying them, then giving them back to the person. This therapy is called gene transfer using anti-KRAS G12V mTCR cells. Objective: To see if anti-KRAS G12 V mTCR cells are safe and can shrink tumors. Eligibility: Adults at least 18 years old with cancer that has the KRAS G12V molecule on the surface of tumors. Design: In another protocol, participants will: Be screened Have cells harvested and grown Have leukapheresis In this protocol, participants will have the procedures below. Participants will be admitted to the hospital. Over 5 days, participants will get 2 chemotherapy medicines as an infusion via catheter in the upper chest. A few days later, participants will get the anti-KRAS G12V mTCR cells via catheter. For up to 3 days, participants will get a drug to make the cells active. A day after getting the cells, participants will get a drug to increase their white blood cell count. This will be a shot or injection under the skin. Participants will recover in the hospital for 1-2 weeks. They will have lab and blood tests. Participants will take an antibiotic for at least 6 months. Participants will have visits every few months for 2 years, and then as determined by their doctor. Visits will be 1-2 days. They will include lab tests, imaging studies, and physical exam. Some visits may include leukapheresis or blood drawn. Participants will have blood collected over several years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • FATE-NK100 Donor Natural Killer Cells, Aldesleukin, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of FATE-NK100 donor natural killer (NK) cells when given together with aldesleukin and combination chemotherapy in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that does not respond to treatment or has come back. The FATE-NK100 NK cell product is made from white blood cells collected from a related donor who is has been exposed to cytomegalovirus (CMV). These “adaptive” NK cells may have more potent anti-cancer killing. Aldesleukin may help FATE-NK100 cells expand and survive in the blood and bone marrow. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving FATE-NK100 donor natural killer cells together with aldesleukin and combination chemotherapy may work better treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Autologous CD8+ SLC45A2-Specific T Lymphocytes with Cyclophosphamide, Aldesleukin, and Ipilimumab in Treating Participants with Metastatic Uveal Melanoma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of autologous CD8 positive (+) SLC45A2-specific T lymphocytes when given together with cyclophosphamide, aldesleukin, and ipilimumab, and to see how well they work in treating participants with uveal melanoma that has spread to other places in the body. To make specialized CD8+ T cells, researchers separate out T cells collected from participant blood and treat them so they are able to target melanoma cells. The blood cells are then given back to the participant. This is known as "adoptive T cell transfer" or "adoptive T cell therapy." Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, may work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Biological therapies, such as aldesleukin, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving autologous CD8+ SLC45A2-specific T lymphocytes together with cyclophosphamide, aldesleukin, and ipilimumab may work better in treating participants with metastatic uveal melanoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Genetically Modified T Cells and Decitabine in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of genetically modified T cells and decitabine in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to previous treatments (refractory). White blood cells called T cells are collected via a process called leukapheresis, genetically modified to recognize and attack tumor cells, then given back to the patient. Decitabine may induce and increase the amount of the target protein NY-ESO-1 available on the surface of tumor cells. Giving genetically modified T cells and decitabine may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • ACTolog in Patients With Solid Cancers

    The study purpose is to learn about the safety and tolerability of IMA101 alone (Cohort 1) or in combination with atezolizumab (Cohort 2) in patients with advanced solid cancers.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • E7 TCR T Cells for Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cancers

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause cervical, throat, anal, and genital cancers. Cancers caused by HPV have a HPV protein called E7 inside of their cells. In this new therapy, researchers take a person s blood, remove certain white blood cells, and insert genes that make them to target cancer cells that have the E7 protein. The genetically changed cells, called E7 TCR cells, are then given back to the person to fight the cancer. Researchers want to see if this can help people. Objective: To determine a safe dose and efficacy of E7 TCR cells and whether these cells can help patients. Eligibility: Adults ages 18-70 with an HPV-16-associated cancer, including cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, or oropharyngeal. Design: Participants will list all their medicines. Participants will have many screening tests, including imaging procedures, heart and lung tests, and lab tests. They will have a large catheter inserted into a vein. Participants will have leukapheresis. Blood will be removed through a needle in the arm. A machine separates the white blood cells. The rest of the blood is returned through a needle in the other arm. The cells will be changed in the lab. Participants will stay in the hospital. Over several days, they will get: Chemotherapy drugs E7 TCR cells Shots or injections to stimulate the cells Participants will be monitored in the hospital up to 12 days. They will get support medicine and have blood and lab tests. Participants will have a clinic visit about 40 days after cell infusion. They will have a physical exam, blood work, scans, and maybe x-rays. Participants will have many follow-up visits with the same procedures. At some visits, they may undergo leukapheresis. Participants will be followed for 15 years.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Administering Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Transduced With a CD70-Binding Chimeric Antigen Receptor to People With CD70 Expressing Cancers

    Background: In a new cancer therapy, researchers take a person s blood, select a certain white blood cell to grow in the lab, and then change the genes of these cells using a virus. The cells are then given back to the person. This is called gene transfer. For this study, researchers will modify the person s white blood cells with anti-CD70. Objectives: To see if a gene transfer with anti-CD70 cells can safely shrink tumors and to be certain the treatment is safe. Eligibility: Adults age 18 and older diagnosed with cancer that has the CD70-expressing cancer. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history, physical exam, scans, and other tests. They may by admitted to the hospital. Leukapheresis will be performed. For this, blood is removed through a needle in the arm. A machine separates the white blood cells. The rest of the blood is returned through a needle in the other arm. Eligible participants will have an intravenous catheter placed in their upper chest. Over several days, they will get chemotherapy drugs and the anti-CD70 cells. They will recover in the hospital. Participants will take an antibiotic for 6 months after treatment. They will repeat leukapheresis. Participants will visit the clinic every 1-3 months for the first year after treatment, every 6 months for the second year, and then as determined by their physician. Follow-up visits will take 1-2 days. At each visit, participants will have lab tests, imaging studies, and a physical exam. Throughout the study, blood will be taken and participants will have many tests to determine the size and extent of their tumor and the treatment s impact.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Gene-Modified T Cells, Vaccine Therapy, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Stage IV or Locally Advanced Solid Tumors Expressing NY-ESO-1

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of nivolumab when given together with gene-modified T cells and vaccine therapy in treating patients with solid tumors that express the cancer-testes antigen NY-ESO-1 gene AND have spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or distant organs (stage IV). T cells are a special type of white blood cells (immune cell) that have the ability to kill cancer cells. Nivolumab may block PD-1 which is found on T cells and help the immune system kill cancer cells. Placing a modified gene for the NY-ESO-1 T cell receptor (TCR) into the patients' T cells in the laboratory and then giving them back to the patient may help the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells that express NY-ESO-1. Dendritic cells are another type of blood cell that can teach other cells in the body to look for cancer cells and attack them. Giving a dendritic cell vaccine with the NY-ESO-1 protein may help dendritic cells teach the immune system to target cancer cells expressing that protein, and further help the T cells attack cancer. Giving nivolumab together with gene-modified T-cells and dendritic cell vaccine may teach the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells that express NY-ESO-1.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Anti-ESO (cancer / test antigen) mTCR-transduced Autologous Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Cancer That Expresses NY-ESO-1

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of anti-ESO (cancer / test antigen) murine T-cell receptor (mTCR)-transduced autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes and combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate in treating patients with cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and expresses the gene NY-ESO-1. Donor white blood cells that are treated in the laboratory with anti-cluster of differentiation (CD)3 may help treat metastatic cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and fludarabine phosphate, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more cancer cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate white blood cells, including natural killer cells, to kill metastatic cancer cells. Giving anti-ESO (cancer / test antigen) mTCR-transduced autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes together with combination chemotherapy and aldesleukin may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York

  • CD8+ T Cell Therapy and Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Gastrointestinal Tumors

    This phase I pilot trial studies the side effects of cluster of differentiation 8 (CD8)+ T cells in treating patients with gastrointestinal tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Tumor cells and blood are used to help create an adoptive T cell therapy, such as CD8+ T cell therapy, that is individually designed for a patient and may help doctors learn more about genetic changes in the tumor. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving CD8+ T cell therapy and pembrolizumab may work better in treating patients with gastrointestinal tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Donor Natural Killer Cells and Hu3F8 in Treating Patients with High-Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of donor natural killer cells when given together with humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8 (hu3F8) in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has not responded to standard treatment or has returned after treatment. Natural killer cells are a type of white blood cell that can recognize and kill abnormal cells in the body, and can work together with antibodies to kill target cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8, can recognize a specific protein present on the target cancer cells. Giving donor natural killer cells together with humanized monoclonal antibody 3F8 may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • A Prospective Randomized and Phase 2 Trial for Metastatic Melanoma Using Adoptive Cell Therapy With Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes Plus IL-2 Either Alone or Following the Administration of Pembrolizumab

    Background: Cell therapy is an experimental cancer therapy. It takes young tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (Young TIL) cells from a person s tumors and grows them in a lab. Then they are returned to the person. Researchers think adding the drug pembrolizumab might make the therapy more effective. Objective: To test if adding pembrolizumab to cell therapy is safe and effective to shrink melanoma tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 70 years with metastatic melanoma Design: Participants will be screened with: Physical exam CT, MRI, or PET scans X-rays Heart and lung function tests Blood and urine tests Before treatment, participants will have: A piece of tumor taken from a biopsy or during surgery in order to grow TIL cells Leukapheresis: Blood flows through a needle in one arm and into a machine that removes white blood cells. The rest of the blood returns through a needle in the other arm. An IV catheter placed in the chest for getting TIL cells, aldesleukin, and pembrolizumab (if assigned) Participants will stay in the hospital for treatment. This includes: Daily chemotherapy for 1 week For some participants, pembrolizumab infusion 1 day after chemotherapy TIL cell infusion 2 4 days after chemotherapy, then aldesleukin infusion every 8 hours for up to 12 doses Possible filgrastim injection Recovery for 1 2 weeks After treatment, participants will: Take an antibiotic and antiviral for at least 6 months If assigned, have pembrolizumab treatment every 3 weeks for 3 more doses. They may have another round. Have 2-day follow-up visits every 1 3 months for 1 year and then every 6 months
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • High-Dose Aldesleukin and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Melanoma That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well high-dose aldesleukin and ipilimumab works in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma that cannot be removed by surgery. Biological therapies, such as aldesleukin, may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving high-dose aldesleukin together with ipilimumab may work better in treating patients with melanoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • T Cell Receptor Immunotherapy for Patients With Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Background: The NCI Surgery Branch has developed an experimental therapy that involves taking white blood cells from patients' tumors, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, and then giving the cells back to the patient. These cells are called Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes, or TIL and we have given this type of treatment to over 100 patients. In this study, we are selecting a specific subset of white blood cells from the tumor that we think are the most effective in fighting tumors and will use only these cells in making the tumor fighting cells. Objective: The purpose of this study is to see if these specifically selected tumor fighting cells can cause non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) tumors to shrink and to see if this treatment is safe. Eligibility: - Adults age 18-70 with NSCLC who have a tumor that can be safely removed. Design: - Work up stage: Patients will be seen as an outpatient at the NIH clinical Center and undergo a history and physical examination, scans, x-rays, lab tests, and other tests as needed - Surgery: If the patients meet all of the requirements for the study they will undergo surgery to remove a tumor that can be used to grow the TIL product. - Leukapheresis: Patients may undergo leukapheresis to obtain additional white blood cells. {Leukapheresis is a common procedure, which removes only the white blood cells from the patient.} - Treatment: Once their cells have grown, the patients will be admitted to the hospital for the conditioning chemotherapy, the TIL cells and aldesleukin. They will stay in the hospital for about 4 weeks for the treatment. Follow up: Patients will return to the clinic for a physical exam, review of side effects, lab tests, and scans about every 1-3 months for the first year, and then every 6 months to 1 year as long as their tumors are shrinking. Follow up visits take up to 2 days. ...
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • T Cell Receptor Immunotherapy Targeting MAGE-A3 for Patients With Metastatic Cancer Who Are HLA-DP0401 Positive

    Background: The NCI Surgery Branch has developed an experimental therapy for treating patients with metastatic cancer that involves taking white blood cells from the patient, growing them in the laboratory in large numbers, genetically modifying these specific cells with a type of virus (retrovirus) to attack only the tumor cells, and then giving the cells back to the patient. This type of therapy is called gene transfer. In this protocol, we are modifying the patient s white blood cells with a retrovirus that has the gene for anti-MAGE-A3-DP0401 / 0402 incorporated in the retrovirus. Objective: The purpose of this study is to determine a safe number of these cells to infuse and to see if these particular tumor-fighting cells (anti-MAGE-A3-DP0401 / 0402 cells) cause tumors to shrink and to be certain the treatment is safe. Eligibility: - Adults age 18-70 with metastatic cancer expressing the MAGE-A3 molecule. Design: - Work up stage: Patients will be seen as an outpatient at the NIH clinical Center and undergo a history and physical examination, scans, x-rays, lab tests, and other tests as needed - Leukapheresis: If the patients meet all of the requirements for the study they will undergo leukapheresis to obtain white blood cells to make the anti-MAGE-A3-DP0401 / 0402 cells. {Leukapheresis is a common procedure, which removes only the white blood cells from the patient.} - Treatment: Once their cells have grown, the patients will be admitted to the hospital for the conditioning chemotherapy, the anti-MAGE-A3-DP0401 / 0402 cells and aldesleukin. They will stay in the hospital for approximately 4 weeks for the treatment. - Follow up: Patients will return to the clinic for a physical exam, review of side effects, lab tests, and scans about every 1-3 months for the first year, and then every 6 months to 1 year as long as their tumors are shrinking.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Genetically Modified T-Cells Followed by Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Melanoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically modified T-cells followed by aldesleukin in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma. T-cells are a type of white blood cell that help the body fight infections. Genes that may help the T-cells recognize melanoma cells are placed into the T-cells in the laboratory. Adding these genes to the T cells may help them kill more tumor cells when they are put back in the body. Aldesleukin may enhance this effect by stimulating white blood cells to kill more melanoma cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cytokine-Induced Memory-Like NK Cells in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of activated natural killer (NK) cells and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Giving chemotherapy before a donor natural killer cell infusion may help stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's natural killer cells. Modified natural killer cells may help the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells. Aldesleukin (interleukin-2) may stimulate the white blood cells (including natural killer cells) to kill cancer cells.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Donor Natural Killer Cells and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High Risk Myeloid Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of donor natural killer cells when given together with donor stem cell transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with myeloid malignancies that are likely to come back or spread. Giving chemotherapy, such as busulfan and fludarabine phosphate, before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Genetically Modified Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes Followed by Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Stage III or Metastatic Melanoma

    This phase I / II trial studies how well genetically modified therapeutic autologous lymphocytes (patient's own white blood cells) followed by aldesleukin work in treating patients with stage III melanoma or melanoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Placing chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) and nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) into lymphocytes (white blood cells) may help the body build an immune response to kill melanoma cells. Aldesleukin may enhance this effect by stimulating white blood cells to kill more melanoma cells. Giving genetically modified therapeutic autologous lymphocytes together with aldesleukin may be a better treatment for melanoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas