Clinical Trials Using Fludarabine Phosphate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Fludarabine Phosphate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 101-119 of 119

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Cytarabine, Filgrastim-sndz, Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin, and Idarubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, filgrastim-sndz, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and idarubicin hydrochloride work in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and idarubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as gemtuzumab ozogamicin, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim-sndz, may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, filgrastim-sndz, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and idarubicin hydrochloride may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Busulfan, Anti-thymocyte Globulin, and Total-Body Irradiation before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Leukemia

    This clinical trial studies fludarabine phosphate, busulfan, anti-thymocyte globulin, and total-body irradiation before donor stem cell transplantation in treating younger patients with leukemia. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: Lurie Children's Hospital-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients with Fanconi Anemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation and how well they work in treating patients with Fanconi anemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, fludarabine phosphate, and anti-thymocyte globulin work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Busulfan, Melphalan, and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well giving busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine phosphate together followed by a donor umbilical cord blood transplant works in treating younger patients with acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is likely to recur (come back), or spread. Giving chemotherapy drugs, such as busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine phosphate, before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine before and after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes and High-Dose Aldesleukin with or without Autologous Dendritic Cells in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin with or without autologous dendritic cells work in treating patients with melanoma that has spread to other areas of the body. Vaccines made from a person's tumor cells and special blood cells (dendritic cells) may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate the white blood cells to kill tumor cells. It is not yet known whether therapeutic tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose aldesleukin are more effective when given together with or without dendritic cells in shrinking or slowing the growth of melanoma. The clinical benefits of receiving tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in combination with the B-Raf proto-oncogene, serine / threonine kinase (BRAF) inhibitor will be studied, in patients who have progressive disease (PD) with using the BRAF inhibitor prior to TIL treatment. Leptomeningeal disease (LMD) is unfortunately a common development in patients with melanoma, with an extremely poor prognosis, translating into an overall survival of only weeks. With the novel approach of combining intrathecal TILs and intrathecal interleukin (IL)-2, researchers hope to induce long term disease stabilization or remission of LMD.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Immunotherapy Following Reduced Intensity Conditioning and Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant for Poor Risk CD30+ Hodgkin Lymphoma Patients

    Patients with relapsed or refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma who are CD30+ will receive a standard of care reduced intensity regimen and an allogeneic stem cell transplant (from another person, related or unrelated). Following recovery, patients will receive a medication called Brentuximab Vendotin which is targeted against CD30+ cells. The study hypothesis is that this treatment will be safe and well tolerated in children and young adults.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • Ivosidenib and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of IDH1 Mutant Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ivosidenib when given together with combination chemotherapy for the treatment of 1DH1 mutant acute myeloid leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Ivosidenib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking the IDH1 mutation and some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and filgrastim, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ivosidenib with combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia compared to chemotherapy alone.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Cord Blood Transplant with OTS for the Treatment of HIV Positive Hematologic Cancers

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of a cord blood transplant using OTS and to see how well it works in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive hematologic (blood) cancers. After a cord blood transplant, the immune cells, including white blood cells, can take a while to recover, putting the patient at increased risk of infection. OTS consists of blood stem cells that help to produce mature blood cells, including immune cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and thiotepa, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Total body irradiation is a type of whole-body radiation. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a cord blood transplant with OTS may help to kill any cancer cells that are in the body and make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new stem cells to grow and reduce the risk of infection.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Modified Immune Cells (CD19 / CD20 CAR-T Cells) in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of CD19 / CD20 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells when given together with chemotherapy, and to see how effective they are in treating patients with non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). In CAR-T cell therapy, a patient's white blood cells (T cells) are changed in the laboratory to produce an engineered receptor that allows the T cell to recognize and respond to CD19 and CD20 proteins. CD19 and CD20 are commonly found on non-Hodgkin’s B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Chemotherapy drugs such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide can control cancer cells by killing them, by preventing their growth, or by stopping them from spreading. Combining CD19 / CD20 CAR-T cells and chemotherapy may help treat patients with recurrent or refractory B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Donor Stem Cell Transplant with Treosulfan, Fludarabine, and Thiotepa in Treating Patients with Non-malignant Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well donor stem cell transplant, treosulfan, fludarabine, and thiotepa work in treating patients with non-cancerous disorders. Giving chemotherapy before a donor transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation as Conditioning Regimen before Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Patients with Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well total marrow and lymphoid irradiation works as a conditioning regimen before hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome or acute leukemia. Total body irradiation can lower the relapse rate but has some fatal side effects such as irreversible damage to normal internal organs and graft-versus-host disease (a complication after transplantation in which donor's immune cells recognize the host as foreign and attack the recipient's tissues). Total body irradiation is a form of radiotherapy that involves irradiating the patient's entire body in an attempt to suppress the immune system, prevent rejection of the transplanted bone marrow and / or stem cells and to wipe out any remaining cancer cells. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a more recently developed method of delivering radiation. Total marrow and lymphoid irradiation is a method of using IMRT to direct radiation to the bone marrow. Total marrow and lymphoid irradiation may allow a greater dose of radiation to be delivered to the bone marrow as a preparative regimen before hematopoietic cell transplant while causing less side effects to normal organs than standard total body irradiation.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Genetically Engineered Cells (CD22-CAR T Cells) for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory B Cell Malignancies

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and how well cell therapy (CD22-CAR T cells) works for the treatment of B cell malignancies that have come back (recurrent) and does not respond to treatment (refractory). The antigen CD22 is commonly found on B cell cancers. In this study, a CD22 gene and a type of virus (lentivirus; a virus similar to HIV) are used in making the cells (CD22-CAR T cells). The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically-engineered receptor made so that immune cells can recognize and respond to a specific molecule, such as CD22 protein. This uses a portion of an antibody to CD22 and part of a molecule that activates or ‘turns on’ the immune cell. Together, the CAR may help these T cells find the cancer in the body. Giving chemotherapy (fludarabine and cyclophosphamide) before CD22-CAR T cells may help prepare the immune system to accept the CD22-CAR T cells.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Modified Immune Cells (AFM13-NK) and A Monoclonal Antibody (AFM13) in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory CD30 Positive Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of modified umbilical cord blood immune cells (natural killer [NK] cells) combined with the antibody AFM13 (AFM13-NK) and AFM13 alone in treating patients with CD30 positive Hodgkin lymphoma or non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as AFM13, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving AFM13 loaded with NK cells followed by AFM13 alone may kill more cancer cells and decrease cancer growth in patients with CD30 positive AFM13-NK Hodgkin and Non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Comparing ATG or Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide to Calcineurin Inhibitor-Methotrexate as GVHD Prophylaxis after Myeloablative Unrelated Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    This phase II trial studies how well 3 different drug combinations prevent graft versus host disease (GVHD) after donor stem cell transplant. Calcineurin inhibitors, such as cyclosporine and tacrolimus, may stop the activity of donor cells that can cause GVHD. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cyclophosphamide and methotrexate, may also stop the donor cells that can lead to GVHD while not affecting the cancer-fighting donor cells. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG), is used to decrease the body's immune response and reduces the risk of GVHD. It is not yet known which combination of drugs: 1) ATG, methotrexate, and calcineurin inhibitor 2) cyclophosphamide and calcineurin inhibitor, or 3) methotrexate and calcineurin inhibitor may work best to prevent graft versus host disease and result in best overall outcome after donor stem cell transplant.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Gene Modified Immune Cells (IL13Ralpha2 CAR T Cells) after Conditioning Regimen for the Treatment of Stage IIIC or IV Melanoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of modified immune cells (IL13Ralpha2 CAR T cells) after a chemotherapy conditioning regimen for the treatment of patients with stage IIIC or IV melanoma. The study agent is called IL13Ralpha2 CAR T cells. T cells are a special type of white blood cell (immune cells) that have the ability to kill tumor cells. The T cells are obtained from the patients own blood, grown in a laboratory, and modified by adding the IL13Ralpha2 CAR gene. The IL13Ralpha2 CAR gene is inserted into T cells with a virus called a lentivirus. The lentivirus allows cells to make the IL13Ralpha2 CAR protein. This CAR has been designed to bind to a protein on the surface of tumor cells called IL13Ralpha2. This study is being done to determine the dose at which the gene-modified immune cells are safe, how long the cells stay in the body, and if the cells are able to attack the cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Donor Progenitor Cell and Natural Kill Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor progenitor cell and natural killer cell transplant works in treating younger patients with cancers of the blood that are at high risk of coming back or spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When certain stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Anakinra in Preventing Severe Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cell Related Encephalopathy Syndrome in Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well anakinra works in preventing severe chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-related encephalopathy syndrome after chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy in patients with large B-cell lymphoma that has come back or has not responded to treatment. Immunosuppressive therapy, such as anakinra, is used to decrease the body’s immune response, which may prevent severe chimeric antigen receptor T-cell-related encephalopathy syndrome.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Chemotherapy, Total Body Irradiation, and Post-Transplant Cyclophosphamide in Reducing Rates of Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase Ib / II trial studies how well chemotherapy, total body irradiation, and post-transplant cyclophosphamide work in reducing rates of graft versus host disease in patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing a donor stem cell transplant. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and melphalan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient, they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York

  • High Dose Cyclophosphamide, Tacrolimus, and Mycophenolate Mofetil in Preventing Graft Versus Host Disease in Patients with Hematological Malignancies Undergoing Myeloablative or Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil work in preventing graft versus host disease in patients with hematological malignancies undergoing myeloablative or reduced intensity donor stem cell transplant. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft versus host disease). Giving high dose cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California