Clinical Trials Using Fludarabine Phosphate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Fludarabine Phosphate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 101-125 of 140

  • Partially-Matched Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This pilot clinical trial studies partially-matched donor stem cell transplant in treating younger patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and / or total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Lurie Children's Hospital-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  • Genetically Modified T-Cells Followed by Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Melanoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically modified T-cells followed by aldesleukin in treating patients with stage III-IV melanoma. T-cells are a type of white blood cell that help the body fight infections. Genes that may help the T-cells recognize melanoma cells are placed into the T-cells in the laboratory. Adding these genes to the T cells may help them kill more tumor cells when they are put back in the body. Aldesleukin may enhance this effect by stimulating white blood cells to kill more melanoma cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Natural Killer Cells before and after Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    This phase I / II studies the side effects and best dose of natural killer cells before and after donor stem cell transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome, or chronic myelogenous leukemia. Giving chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell or bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cytokine-Induced Memory-Like NK Cells in Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of activated natural killer (NK) cells and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome. Giving chemotherapy before a donor natural killer cell infusion may help stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's natural killer cells. Modified natural killer cells may help the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells. Aldesleukin (interleukin-2) may stimulate the white blood cells (including natural killer cells) to kill cancer cells.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant for GATA2 Mutations

    Background: - GATA2 deficiency is a disease caused by mutations in the GATA2 gene. It can cause different types of leukemia and other diseases. Researchers want to see if a stem cell transplant can be used to treat this condition. A stem cell transplant will give stem cells from a matching donor (related or unrelated) to a recipient. It will allow the donor stem cells to produce healthy bone marrow and blood cells that will attack the recipient s cancer cells. Objectives: - To see if stem cell transplants are successful at treating GATA2 mutations and related conditions. Eligibility: - Recipients who are between 8 and 70 years of age and have GATA2 deficiency, or the clinical syndrome MonoMac. - Donors who are between 6 and 70 years of age and are matched with the recipients. - Have a 10 / 10 or 9 / 10 HLA-matched related or unrelated donor, or a haploidentical related donor. Design: - All participants will be screened with a physical exam and medical history. Blood samples will be collected. Recipients will have imaging studies and other tests. - Donor participants will provide stem cells for the treatment. In some cases, Filgrastim injections will allow these cells to be collected from the blood. Bone marrow donations will be used as stem cells source. - Recipients will have chemotherapy or radiation to prepare for the transplant. On the day of the transplant, they will receive the donated stem cells. - Recipients will stay in the hospital until their condition is stable after transplant. - Frequent blood tests and scans will be required for the first 6 months after the transplant, followed by less frequent visits over time.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Donor Natural Killer Cells and Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High Risk Myeloid Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of donor natural killer cells when given together with donor stem cell transplant and to see how well they work in treating patients with myeloid malignancies that are likely to come back or spread. Giving chemotherapy, such as busulfan and fludarabine phosphate, before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Donor Progenitor Cell and Natural Kill Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor progenitor cell and natural killer cell transplant works in treating younger patients with cancers of the blood that are at high risk of coming back or spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. When certain stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient’s bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating patients with solid tumors that are likely to recur (come back) or spread. Giving low doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells when they do not exactly match the patient's blood. The donated stem cells may replace the patient's immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Donor Natural Killer Cells in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of donor natural kill cells and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that does not respond to treatment (refractory) or has come back after a period of improvement (relapsed). Giving natural killer cells after high dose chemotherapy may boost the patient's immune system by helping it see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and causing it to destroy them (called graft-versus-tumor effect).
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Reduced-Intensity Conditioning before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies reduced-intensity conditioning before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies. Giving low-doses of chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient’s immune system from rejecting the donor’s stem cells. The donated stem cells may replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Giving an infusion of the donor’s T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) before the transplant may help increase this effect.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Genetically Modified Therapeutic Autologous Lymphocytes Followed by Aldesleukin in Treating Patients with Stage III or Metastatic Melanoma

    This phase I / II trial studies how well genetically modified therapeutic autologous lymphocytes (patient's own white blood cells) followed by aldesleukin work in treating patients with stage III melanoma or melanoma that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Placing chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2) and nerve growth factor receptor (NGFR) into lymphocytes (white blood cells) may help the body build an immune response to kill melanoma cells. Aldesleukin may enhance this effect by stimulating white blood cells to kill more melanoma cells. Giving genetically modified therapeutic autologous lymphocytes together with aldesleukin may be a better treatment for melanoma.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Gene and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Malignancies

    This phase IIa trial studies how well gene therapy and vaccine therapy work in treating patients with cancers that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced) undergoing stem cell transplant. Placing a gene that has been created in the laboratory into white blood cells may make the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells. Vaccines made from peptides may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin, Fludarabine Phosphate, Bendamustine Hydrochloride, and Rituximab before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Lymphoid Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of inotuzumab ozogamicin when given together with fludarabine phosphate, bendamustine hydrochloride, and rituximab before donor stem cell transplant in treating patients with lymphoid malignancies. Giving chemotherapy drugs, such as fludarabine phosphate and bendamustine hydrochloride, before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells or abnormal cell and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as inotuzumab ozogamicin and rituximab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cell from a donor can make an immune system response against the body's normal cells. Giving fludarabine phosphate and bendamustine hydrochloride before the transplant together with anti-thymocyte globulin and tacrolimus may stop this from happening.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Natural Killer Cells and Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematological Malignancies

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best way to give natural killer cells and donor umbilical cord blood transplant in treating patients with hematological malignancies. Giving chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells and natural killer cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Genetically Engineered T Cells and Low-Dose Aldesleukin After Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of genetically engineered T cells when given together with low-dose aldesleukin after combination chemotherapy in treating patients with metastatic melanoma. Placing a gene that has been created in the laboratory into white blood cells may make the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells. Aldesleukin may stimulate the white blood cells to kill melanoma cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving genetically engineered T cells and aldesleukin after combination chemotherapy may be an effective treatment for melanoma.
    Location: Loyola University Medical Center, Maywood, Illinois

  • Reduced Intensity Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced intensity donor stem cell transplant works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil after the transplant may stop this from happening. Once the donated stem cells begin working, the patient's immune system may see the remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them. Giving an infusion of the donor's white blood cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) may boost this effect.
    Location: Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Low-Dose Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and the best way to give low-dose donor bone marrow transplant (BMT) and to see how well it works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Giving low-doses of chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's bone marrow cells. When the healthy stem cells from a related or unrelated donor, that do not exactly match the patient's blood, are infused into the patient they may help patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body’s normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving cyclophosphamide, tacrolimus, and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Pilot Study of Reduced-Intensity Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant of DOCK8 Deficiency

    Background: -DOCK8 deficiency is a genetic disorder that affects the immune system and can lead to severe recurrent infections and possible death from infections or certain types of cancers, including blood cancers. A stem cell transplant is a life-saving treatment for this condition. In this study we are evaluating the efficacy and safety of transplant from different donor sources for DOCK8 deficiency. The donors that we are using are matched siblings, matched unrelated donors, and half-matched donors, so called haploidentical related donors, such as as mothers or fathers or half-matched siblings. Objectives: -To determine whether transplant of bone marrow cells from different types of donors corrects DOCK8 deficiency. Eligibility: - Donors: Healthy individuals between 2 and 60 years of age who are matched with a recipient. - Recipient: Individuals between 5 and 40 years of age who have DOCK8 deficiency, have suffered one or more life-threatening infections, or have had certain viral related cancers of cancer and have a stem cell donor. Design: - All participants will be screened with a physical examination and medical history. - DONORS: - Donors will donate bone marrow cells or blood stem cells. If donating blood stem cells, donors will receive injections of filgrastim to release stem cells into the blood. After 5 days of filgrastim injections, donors will have apheresis to donate stem cells and white blood cells that are present in the blood. - Donors who provide the stem cells through bone marrow donation will have their bone marrow cells harvested in the operating room. - RECIPIENTS: - Recipients receiving matched related or unrelated donors will receive 4 days of chemotherapy with busulfan and fludarabine to suppress their immune system and prepare them for the transplant. Donors receiving haploidentical related donors will receive two doses of chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, 5 days of fludarabine, 3 days of busulfan, and one dose of radiation to suppress their immune system and prepare them for the transplant. - After the initial chemotherapy and radiation, recipients will receive the donated stem cells as a single infusion. Recipients may also receive white blood cells from their stem cell donor to encourage acceptance of the stem cells. - After the stem cell transplant, recipients will receive two days of a chemotherapy called cyclophosphamide on day's + 3 and + 4 followed by two drugs tacrolimus and mycophenolate to prevent graft versus host disease where the donor cells attack the patient's body. All patients will remain in the hospital for approximately 1 month, and will be followed with regular visits for up to 3 years with periodic visits thereafter to evaluate the success of the transplant and any side effects.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Disease-Specific High-Dose Conditioning Regimens in Treating Patients Undergoing T-cell Depleted Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies or Other Lethal Hematologic Disorders

    This phase II trial studies how well disease-specific high-dose conditioning regimens work in treating patients undergoing T-cell depleted peripheral blood stem cell transplant for hematologic malignancies or other lethal hematologic disorders. Giving high doses of chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving antithymocyte globulin and removing the T-cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    This phase II trial studies how well donor peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplant works in treating patients with hematologic malignancies. Cyclophosphamide when added to tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil is safe and effective in preventing severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) in most patients with hematologic malignancies undergoing transplantation of bone marrow from half-matched (haploidentical) donors. This approach has extended the transplant option to patients who do not have matched related or unrelated donors, especially for patients from ethnic minority groups. The graft contains cells of the donor's immune system which potentially can recognize and destroy the patient's cancer cells (graft-versus-tumor effect). Rejection of the donor's cells by the patient's own immune system is prevented by giving low doses of chemotherapy (fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide) and total-body irradiation before transplant. Patients can experience low blood cell counts after transplant. Using stem cells and immune cells collected from the donor's circulating blood may result in quicker recovery of blood counts and may be more effective in treating the patient's disease than using bone marrow.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Cytarabine, Filgrastim-sndz, Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin, and Idarubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, filgrastim-sndz, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and idarubicin hydrochloride work in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, and idarubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as gemtuzumab ozogamicin, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim-sndz, may increase the number of immune cells found in bone marrow or peripheral blood and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Giving fludarabine phosphate, cytarabine, filgrastim-sndz, gemtuzumab ozogamicin, and idarubicin hydrochloride may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Fludarabine Phosphate, Busulfan, Anti-thymocyte Globulin, and Total-Body Irradiation before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Leukemia

    This clinical trial studies fludarabine phosphate, busulfan, anti-thymocyte globulin, and total-body irradiation before donor stem cell transplantation in treating younger patients with leukemia. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: Lurie Children's Hospital-Chicago, Chicago, Illinois

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients with Fanconi Anemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation and how well they work in treating patients with Fanconi anemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, fludarabine phosphate, and anti-thymocyte globulin work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Antithymocyte Globulin, Fludarabine Phosphate, Cyclophosphamide, and Total-Body Irradiation Followed By Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients With Sickle Cell Anemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well giving antithymocyte globulin, fludarabine phosphate, and cyclophosphamide together with total body-irradiation (TBI) followed by a donor bone marrow transplant (BMT) works in treating patients with sickle cell anemia. Giving chemotherapy, such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide, and TBI before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of abnormal cells. It also stops the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Giving antithymocyte globulin before transplant and sirolimus and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) after transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Busulfan, Melphalan, and Fludarabine Phosphate Followed by Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with High-Risk Acute Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well giving busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine phosphate together followed by a donor umbilical cord blood transplant works in treating younger patients with acute leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is likely to recur (come back), or spread. Giving chemotherapy drugs, such as busulfan, melphalan, and fludarabine phosphate, before a donor umbilical cord blood transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can also make an immune response against the body's normal cells (called graft-versus-host disease). Giving mycophenolate mofetil and cyclosporine before and after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota