Clinical Trials Using Hydrocortisone Sodium Succinate

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Hydrocortisone Sodium Succinate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-4 of 4
  • A Study to Compare Blinatumomab Alone to Blinatumomab with Nivolumab in Patients Diagnosed with First Relapse B-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (B-ALL)

    This phase II trial studies the effect of nivolumab in combination with blinatumomab compared to blinatumomab alone in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that has come back (relapsed). Down syndrome patients with relapsed B-ALL are included in this study. Blinatumomab is an antibody, which is a protein that identifies and targets specific molecules in the body. Blinatumomab searches for and attaches itself to the cancer cell. Once attached, an immune response occurs which may kill the cancer cell. Nivolumab is a medicine that may boost a patient’s immune system. Giving nivolumab in combination with blinatumomab may cause the cancer to stop growing for a period of time, and for some patients, it may lessen the symptoms, such as pain, that are caused by the cancer.
    Location: 33 locations

  • Ribociclib in Combination with Everolimus and Dexamethasone in Treating Children and Young Adults with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of ribociclib when given with everolimus and dexamethasone, and to see how well they work in treating children and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Ribociclib and everolimus may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Anti-inflammatory drugs, such as dexamethasone lower the body’s immune response and are used with other drugs in the treatment of some types of cancer. Giving ribociclib together with everolimus and dexamethasone may work as a possible treatment for relapsed or refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Inotuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with MRD Positive CD22+ Relapsed B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well inotuzumab ozogamicin works in treating patients with minimal residual disease (MRD) positive CD22 positive (+) B cell acute lymphoblastic lymphoma that has come back. Minimal residual disease is when there is evidence for remaining tumor following initial treatment that is only apparent using highly sensitive techniques, but there are no other signs of leukemia in the bone marrow or blood yet. Inotuzumab ozogamicin is a monoclonal antibody, called inotuzumab, linked to a toxic agent called ozogamicin. Inotuzumab attaches to CD22+ cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers ozogamicin to kill them.
    Location: Saint Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Intensive Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase II trial studies how well intensive combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as daunorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, prednisone, leucovorin calcium, cytarabine, etoposide, and liposomal cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Biological therapies, such as mercaptopurine, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Dietary supplements, such as levocarnitine, may reduce the incidence of liver damage. Pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with, rituximab, mercaptopurine, levocarnitine, pegaspargase, methotrexate, dasatinib and imatinib mesylate may be an effective treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoblastic lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations