Clinical Trials Using NY-ESO-1 Reactive TCR Retroviral Vector Transduced Autologous PBL

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying NY-ESO-1 Reactive TCR Retroviral Vector Transduced Autologous PBL. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-2 of 2
  • Gene-Modified T Cells, Vaccine Therapy, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Stage IV or Locally Advanced Solid Tumors Expressing NY-ESO-1

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of nivolumab when given together with gene-modified T cells and vaccine therapy in treating patients with solid tumors that express the cancer-testes antigen NY-ESO-1 gene AND have spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or distant organs (stage IV). T cells are a special type of white blood cells (immune cell) that have the ability to kill cancer cells. Nivolumab may block PD-1 which is found on T cells and help the immune system kill cancer cells. Placing a modified gene for the NY-ESO-1 T cell receptor (TCR) into the patients' T cells in the laboratory and then giving them back to the patient may help the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells that express NY-ESO-1. Dendritic cells are another type of blood cell that can teach other cells in the body to look for cancer cells and attack them. Giving a dendritic cell vaccine with the NY-ESO-1 protein may help dendritic cells teach the immune system to target cancer cells expressing that protein, and further help the T cells attack cancer. Giving nivolumab together with gene-modified T-cells and dendritic cell vaccine may teach the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells that express NY-ESO-1.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Gene and Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients with Advanced Malignancies

    This phase IIa trial studies how well gene therapy and vaccine therapy work in treating patients with cancers that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced) undergoing stem cell transplant. Placing a gene that has been created in the laboratory into white blood cells may make the body build an immune response to kill cancer cells. Vaccines made from peptides may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California