Clinical Trials Using Trastuzumab Emtansine

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Trastuzumab Emtansine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-17 of 17
  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Patients with Advanced Refractory Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Multiple Myeloma (The MATCH Screening Trial)

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.
    Location: 1196 locations

  • Testing the Ability to Decrease Chemotherapy in Patients with HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Who Have No Remaining Cancer at Surgery after Limited Pre-operative Chemotherapy and HER2-Targeted Therapy

    This trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab work in eliminating further chemotherapy after surgery in patients with HER2-positive stage II-IIIa breast cancer who have no cancer remaining at surgery (either in the breast or underarm lymph nodes) after pre-operative chemotherapy and HER2-targeted therapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab is a form of “targeted therapy” because it works by attaching itself to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of tumor cells, known as HER2 receptors. When trastuzumab attaches to HER2 receptors, the signals that tell the cells to grow are blocked and the tumor cell may be marked for destruction by the body’s immune system. Pertuzumab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab may enable fewer chemotherapy drugs to be given without compromising patient outcomes compared to the usual treatment.
    Location: 538 locations

  • I-SPY TRIAL: Neoadjuvant and Personalized Adaptive Novel Agents to Treat Breast Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to further advance the ability to practice personalized medicine by learning which new drug agents are most effective with which types of breast cancer tumors and by learning more about which early indicators of response (tumor analysis prior to surgery via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images along with tissue and blood samples) are predictors of treatment success.
    Location: 20 locations

  • A Study of Tucatinib vs. Placebo in Combination With Ado-trastuzumab Emtansine (T-DM1) for Patients With Advanced or Metastatic HER2+ Breast Cancer

    This study is being done to see if tucatinib with ado-trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) works better than T-DM1 alone to help patients who have a specific type of breast cancer called HER2 positive breast carcinoma. The breast cancer in this study is either metastatic (spread into other parts of the body) or cannot be removed completely with surgery. Patients in this study will be randomly assigned to get either tucatinib or placebo (a pill with no medicine). This is a blinded study, so neither patients nor their doctors will know whether a patient gets tucatinib or placebo. All patients in the study will get T-DM1, a drug that is often used to treat this cancer. Each treatment cycle lasts 21 days. Patients will swallow tucatinib pills or placebo pills two times every day. Patients will get T-DM1 injections from the study site staff on the first day of every cycle.
    Location: 21 locations

  • Neratinib, Capecitabine, and Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Patients with HER2-Positive Breast Cancer That Has Spread to the Brain

    This phase II trial studies how well neratinib, capecitabine, and trastuzumab emtansine work in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer that has spread to the brain. Neratinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) is a monoclonal antibody, called trastuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called DM1. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers DM1 to kill them. Giving neratinib, capecitabine, and trastuzumab emtansine together may be an effective treatment for breast cancer.
    Location: 13 locations

  • T-DM1 with or without Palbociclib in Treating Patients with Metastatic HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well T-DM1 with or without palbociclib works in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic). T-DM1 is a monoclonal antibody, called trastuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called DM1. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers DM1 to kill them. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether T-DM1 with or without palbociclib may work better in treating patients with HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer.
    Location: 12 locations

  • TPIV100 and Sargramostim for the Treatment of HER2 Positive, Stage II-III Breast Cancer in Patients with Residual Disease after Chemotherapy and Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well TPIV100 and sargramostim work in treating patients with HER2 positive, stage II-III breast cancer that has remained after chemotherapy and surgery. It also studies why some HER2 positive breast cancer patients respond better to chemotherapy in combination with trastuzumab and pertuzumab. TPIV100 is a type of vaccine made from HER2 peptide that may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells that express HER2. Sargramostim increases the number of white blood cells in the body following chemotherapy for certain types of cancer and is used to alert the immune system. It is not yet known if TPIV100 and sargramostim will work better in treating patients with HER2 positive, stage II-III breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • A Study To Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety Of Atezolizumab or Placebo in Combination With Neoadjuvant Doxorubicin + Cyclophosphamide Followed By Paclitaxel + Trastuzumab + Pertuzumab In Early Her2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This study (also known as IMpassion050) will evaluate the efficacy and safety of atezolizumab compared with placebo when given in combination with neoadjuvant dose-dense anthracycline (doxorubicin) + cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel + trastuzumab + pertuzumab (ddAC-PacHP) in patients with early HER2-positive breast cancer (T2-4, N1-3, M0).
    Location: 2 locations

  • Serial Measurements of Molecular and Architectural Responses to Therapy (SMMART) PRIME Trial

    This phase Ib trial determines if samples from a patient’s cancer can be tested to find combinations of drugs that provide clinical benefit for the kind of cancer the patient has. This study is also being done to understand why cancer drugs can stop working and how different cancers in different people respond to different types of therapy.
    Location: OHSU Knight Cancer Institute, Portland, Oregon

  • Utomilumab with Trastuzumab Emtansine or Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with Advanced HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of utomilumab with trastuzumab emtansine or trastuzumab in treating patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as utomilumab and trastuzumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trastuzumab emtansine is a monoclonal antibody, where trastuzumab is linked to a chemotherapy drug called DM1. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers DM1 to kill them.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • T-DM1 Alone Versus T-DM1 and Metronomic Temozolomide in Secondary Prevention of HER2-Positive Breast Cancer Brain Metastases Following Stereotactic Radiosurgery

    Background: Sometimes breast cancer spreads (metastasizes) to the brain. Researchers want to study new treatments for brain metastases. The drug Temozolomide is approved to treat brain tumors. Researchers want to see if combining it with the drug T-DMI prevents the formation of new metastases in the brain. Objective: To study if Temozolomide with T-DM1 lowers the chance of having new metastases in the brain. Eligibility: Adults at least 18 years old with a HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to the brain and was recently treated with stereotactic radiation or surgery. Design: Participants will be screened with - Medical history - Physical exam - Heart tests - A scan (CT) that makes a picture of the body using a small amount of radiation - A scan (MRI) that uses a magnetic field to make an image of the brain - Blood tests. - Pregnancy test. The study will be done in 3-week cycles. All participants will get T-DM1 on Day 1 of every cycle through a small plastic tube inserted in an arm vein. Some participants will also take Temozolomide capsules by mouth every day. Participants will keep a medication diary. During the study, participants will also: - Repeat most of the screening tests. - Answer questions about their general well-being and functioning. Participants will have lumbar puncture at least 2 times. A needle is inserted into the spinal canal low in the back and cerebrospinal fluid is collected. This will be done with local anesthesia and with the help of images. Participants will be asked to provide tumor samples when available. Participants will have a follow-up visit about 1 month after stopping the study drug. They will be contacted by telephone or email every 3 months after that.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Trastuzumab Emtansine in Treating Patients with HER2 Amplified or Mutant Advanced Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab emtansine works in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) amplified or HER2 mutant cancers, including lung and bladder, that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced). Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab emtansine, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • DZD1516 in Combination With Trastuzumab and Capecitabine, or in Combination With T-DM1, in Patients With Metastatic HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

    DZD1516 is an oral, blood brain barrier penetrable, selective HER2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor. This study is designed to evaluate the safety and tolerability of DZD1516 in patients with metastatic HER2 positive breast cancer who have progressed following prior therapy. This is the first time this drug has ever been tested in patients, and so it will help to understand what type of side effects may occur with the drug treatment. It will also measure the levels of drug in the body and assess its anti-cancer activity as monotherapy and in combination with trastuzumab and / or capecitabine, or in combination with T-DM1
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • A Safety Extension Study of Trastuzumab Emtansine in Participants Previously Treated With Trastuzumab Emtansine Alone or in Combination With Other Anti-Cancer Therapy in One of the Parent Studies

    This is a global, multicenter, open-label safety extension study. Participants receiving single-agent trastuzumab emtansine or trastuzumab emtansine administered in combination with other anti-cancer therapies in a Genentech / Roche-sponsored parent study who are active and receiving benefit at the closure of parent study are eligible for continued treatment in this study.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • BN-Brachyury, Entinostat, Adotrastuzumab Emtansine and M7824 in Advanced Stage Breast Cancer (BrEAsT)

    Background: Breast cancer is the second most common cause of U.S. cancer deaths in women. Immunotherapy drugs use a person s immune system to fight cancer. Researchers want to see if a new combination of immunotherapy drugs can help treat breast cancer that has gone to places in the body outside of the breast (metastasized). Objective: To learn if a new combination of immunotherapy drugs can shrink tumors in people with metastatic breast cancer. Eligibility: Adults 18 and older who have been diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer, such as Triple Negative Breast Cancer (TNBC) or ER- / PR- / HER2+ Breast Cancer (HER2+BC) Design: Participants will be screened with: medical history physical exam disease confirmation (or tumor biopsy) tumor scans (computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and / or bone scan) blood and urine tests electrocardiogram (measures the heart s electrical activity) echocardiogram (creates images of the heart). Participants will be assigned to 1 of 3 groups. The drugs they get will be based on the group they are in. Drugs are given in cycles. Each cycle = 3 weeks. Participants will be seen in clinic every 3 weeks, prior to the start of a new cycle. At each visit, participants will have an clinical exam, have blood drawn and will be asked about any side effects. They will repeat the screening tests during the study. New scans, like a CT scan, will be done every 6 weeks to see if the treatment is working. All participants will get BN-Brachyury. It is 2 different vaccines - a prime and a boost. First the priming vaccines, called MVA-BN-Brachyury help to jump start the immune system. Next the boosting vaccines, called FPV-Brachyury help to keep the immune system going. They are injected under the skin during different cycles. All participants will get M7824 (also known as Bintrafusp alfa ), which is an immunotherapy drug. Some participants will get a commonly used drug is HER2+ breast cancer called adotrastuzumab emtansine (also known as T-DM1DM1 or kadcyla). For both, a needle is inserted into a vein to give the drugs slowly. Some participants will take Entinostat weekly by mouth. It is in tablet form. Participants will keep a pill diary. Participants will continue on their assigned treatment until their cancer grows, they develop side effects or want to stop treatment. About 28 days after treatment ends, participants will have a follow-up visit or a telephone call. Then they will be contacted every 3 months for 1 year, then every 6 months for 1 year. They may have more tumor scans or continue treatment.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Abemaciclib with or without T-DM1 for the Treatment of HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well abemaciclib with or without T-DM1 works for the treatment of HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Abemaciclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. T-DM1 is a monoclonal antibody, called trastuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug called DM1. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers DM1 to kill them. Giving abemaciclib and T-DM1 may work better in treating patients with breast cancer compared to abemaciclib or T-DM1 alone.
    Location: 8 locations

  • T-DM1 and Tucatinib Compared with T-DM1 Alone in Preventing Relapses in People with High Risk HER2-Positive Breast Cancer, the CompassHER2 RD Trial

    This phase III trial compares the effect of usual treatment with trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) alone vs. T-DM1 in combination with tucatinib. T-DM1 is a monoclonal antibody, called trastuzumab, linked to a chemotherapy drug, called DM1. Trastuzumab is a form of targeted therapy because it attaches to specific molecules (receptors) on the surface of cancer cells, known as HER2 receptors, and delivers DM1 to kill them. Tucatinib blocks HER2, which may help keep cancer cells from growing and may kill them. Giving T-DM1 in combination with tucatinib may work better in preventing breast cancer from relapsing in patients with HER2 positive breast cancer compared to T-DM1 alone.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.