Clinical Trials Using Trastuzumab

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Trastuzumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 51-59 of 59

  • Chemotherapy before Surgery and Tissue Sample Collection in Patients with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This randomized pilot clinical trial studies chemotherapy before surgery and tissue sample collection in patients with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells o grow and spread. Giving doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel and trastuzumab may kill more tumor cells. Collecting and storing samples of tissue from patients with breast cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about how well patients will respond to treatment.
    Location: Montefiore Medical Center-Weiler Hospital, Bronx, New York

  • Capecitabine, Cyclophosphamide, Lapatinib Ditosylate, and Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with HER2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well capecitabine, cyclophosphamide, lapatinib ditosylate, and trastuzumab work in treating patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive metastatic breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Giving capecitabine and cyclophosphamide daily may kill more tumor cells. Lapatinib ditosylate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, can block tumor growth in different ways. Some block the ability of the tumor to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Giving capecitabine, cyclophosphamide, lapatinib ditosylate, and trastuzumab together may be an effective treatment for breast cancer.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Trastuzumab in Treating Leptomeningeal Metastases in Patients with HER2-Positive Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of trastuzumab and to see how well it works in treating cancer that has spread to the thin layers of tissue that cover and protect the brain and spinal cord (meninges) in patients with certain nervous system tumors or patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cyclophosphamide and Vaccine Therapy with or without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This trial studies cyclophosphamide and vaccine therapy with or without trastuzumab in treating patients with stage IV breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Vaccines made from gene-modified tumor cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Immunotherapy with trastuzumab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether cyclophosphamide and vaccine therapy is more effective when given together with or without trastuzumab in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • A Safety Extension Study of Trastuzumab Emtansine in Participants Previously Treated With Trastuzumab Emtansine Alone or in Combination With Other Anti-Cancer Therapy in One of the Parent Studies

    This is a global, multicenter, open-label safety extension study. Participants receiving single-agent trastuzumab emtansine or trastuzumab emtansine administered in combination with other agents in a Genentech / Roche-sponsored parent study who are active and deriving benefit at the closure of parent study are eligible for continued treatment in this study.
    Location: Translational Oncology Research International, Los Angeles, California

  • Study of Neratinib +Trastuzumab or Neratinib + Cetuximab in Patients With KRAS / NRAS / BRAF / PIK3CA Wild-Type Metastatic Colorectal Cancer by HER2 Status

    This is a phase II trial to examine the efficacy of neratinib plus trastuzumab or neratinib plus cetuximab in patients with "quadruple wild-type" (all RAS / NRAS / BRAF / PIK3CA wild-type), metastatic colorectal cancer based on HER2 status (amplified, non-amplified [wild-type] or mutated). Patients must have confirmed quadruple wild-type (WT) genotype, via NSABP MPR-1 or from colonic biopsy or a metastatic biopsy taken prior to treatment, and known HER2 status.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin before Surgery in Treating Nigerian Women with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel works with carboplatin before surgery in treating Nigerian women with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Utomilumab with Trastuzumab Emtansine or Trastuzumab in Treating Patients with Advanced HER2-Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of utomilumab with trastuzumab emtansine or trastuzumab in treating patients with HER2-positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as utomilumab and trastuzumab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trastuzumab emtansine is a monoclonal antibody, where trastuzumab is linked to a chemotherapy drug called DM1. Trastuzumab attaches to HER2 positive cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers DM1 to kill them.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Chemotherapy with or without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without metformin hydrochloride work in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, carboplatin, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and pegfilgrastim, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride may prevent or lower risk of breast cancer and decrease cancer cells, lower risk of cancer spreading. It is not yet known whether giving metformin hydrochloride with chemotherapy will work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 6 locations