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Understanding Cervical Changes: A Health Guide for Women

  • Posted: 01/21/2010

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Table 3: What Does It Mean: Results From Your Biopsy or Endocervical Curettage


Possible ResultWhat Your Health Care Provider May Recommend
Tissue appears normalYour health care provider may not need to do any further testing or treatment right away but may recommend a repeat Pap test or HPV test in 6-12 months.
Tissue shows only mild changes (low-grade)

Your biopsy may have removed all abnormal tissue.

You may or may not need more treatment—even if some abnormal tissue remains.

Your health care provider may not need to do any further testing or treatment right away, but may recommend a repeat Pap test or HPV test in 6-12 months.

Results are unclearYour doctor may do more tests, such as conization.
Severe (high-grade) changes are found

You will need treatment to remove more tissue.

Your doctor may perform LEEP, cryotherapy, laser therapy, or conization.

Invasive cancer cells are found

Your doctor will do more tests to find out the stage (extent) of the cancer. Your treatment will depend on:

  • The stage of your cancer
  • Your age
  • Whether you may want to become pregnant in the future
  • Your general health
  • Other factors

To learn about more treatment options, see the National Cancer Institute booklet, "What You Need To Know About Cancer of the Cervix," or visit www.cancer.gov and search for "cervical cancer."