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Clinical Trials (PDQ®)

Clinical Trials (PDQ®)

Prevention of Delayed Nausea A Phase III Double-Blind Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

Basic Trial Information
Trial Description
     Summary
     Further Trial Information
     Eligibility Criteria
Trial Contact Information

Basic Trial Information

PhaseTypeStatusAgeSponsorProtocol IDs
Phase IIISupportive careCompleted18 and overNCICDR0000544841
U10CA037420, URCC-U1105, URCC-04-02, U1105, NCT00475085

Trial Description

Summary

RATIONALE: Antiemetic drugs, such as granisetron, dexamethasone, prochlorperazine, aprepitant, and palonosetron, may help lessen or prevent nausea. It is not yet known which combination of antiemetic drugs is more effective in preventing nausea caused by chemotherapy.

PURPOSE: This randomized phase III trial is comparing different combinations of granisetron, dexamethasone, prochlorperazine, aprepitant, and palonosetron to see how well they work in preventing nausea in patients undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer.

Further Study Information

OBJECTIVES:

Primary

  • Compare the efficacy of palonosetron hydrochloride and dexamethasone followed by prochlorperazine with vs without dexamethasone in preventing delayed nausea in women with chemotherapy-naive breast cancer. (Arms I and IV)
  • Determine if palonosetron hydrochloride is more effective than granisetron hydrochloride in controlling treatment-related delayed nausea in these patients. (Arms I and II)
  • Determine if the currently recommended antiemetic guideline of aprepitant combined with palonosetron hydrochloride and dexamethasone is the most effective antiemetic regimen for controlling treatment-related delayed nausea in these patients. (Arms III and IV)

Secondary

  • Determine if the addition of dexamethasone to prochlorperazine is more effective than the same regimen without dexamethasone for reducing interference with functioning caused by chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in these patients. (Arms I and IV)
  • Determine if palonosetron hydrochloride is more effective than granisetron hydrochloride for reducing interference with functioning caused by chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in these patients. (Arms I and II)
  • Determine if the currently recommended antiemetic guideline of aprepitant combined with palonosetron hydrochloride and dexamethasone is the most effective antiemetic regimen for reducing interference with functioning due to chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in these patients. (Arms III and IV)

OUTLINE: This is a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter study. Patients are stratified according to CCOP center and gender. Patients are randomized to 1 of 4 treatment arms. Patients receive study treatment approximately 30 minutes before their scheduled first chemotherapy treatment.

  • Arm I: Patients receive palonosetron hydrochloride IV, dexamethasone IV, and oral placebo once on day 1 and oral prochlorperazine 3 times daily and another oral placebo once daily on days 2 and 3.
  • Arm II: Patients receive granisetron hydrochloride IV, dexamethasone IV, and oral placebo once on day 1 and oral prochlorperazine 3 times daily and another oral placebo once daily on days 2 and 3.
  • Arm III: Patients receive palonosetron hydrochloride IV and dexamethasone IV once on day 1, oral aprepitant once daily on days 1-3, and oral dexamethasone once daily and oral placebo twice daily on days 2 and 3.
  • Arm IV: Patients receive palonosetron hydrochloride IV, dexamethasone IV, and oral placebo once on day 1 and oral prochlorperazine 3 times daily and oral dexamethasone once daily on days 2 and 3.

Quality of life is assessed at baseline and on day 4. Nausea and vomiting, fatigue, sleep quality, exercise, and the need for rescue medication (metoclopramide) are assessed on days 1-4.

PROJECTED ACCRUAL: A total of 890 patients will be accrued for this study.

Eligibility Criteria

Inclusion criteria:

  • Have a diagnosis of cancer and be chemotherapy naive.
  • Must be scheduled to receive a chemotherapy treatment containing doxorubicin hydrochloride, epirubicin hydrochloride, cisplatin, carboplatin, or oxaliplatin (any dose or schedule) without concurrent radiotherapy or interferon treatment
  • Chemotherapy may be for adjuvant, neoadjuvant, curative or palliative intent.
  • Dose-dense regimens (e.g. chemotherapy with doxorubicin or epirubicin given every two weeks)are allowed.
  • For the purposes of this study, Day 1 of chemotherapy will be defined as the day of administration of cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin, doxorubicin or epirubicin.
  • Regimens with multiple-day doses of doxorubicin, epirubicin, cisplatin, carboplatin, oxaliplatin, dacarbazine, hexamethylmelamine, nitrosoureas, or streptozocin are not allowed. Chemotherapy agents, other than those listed above, may be given orally, intravenously, or by continuous infusion on one or multiple days.
  • Able to understand English

Exclusion criteria:

  • No symptomatic brain metastases
  • No concurrent or impending bowel obstruction
  • Regimens containing liposomal doxorubicin or cisplatin are not allowed.
  • No concurrent pimozide, terfenadine, astemizole, or cisapride
  • No concurrent doxorubicin hydrochloride liposome or cisplatin
  • No concurrent multiple-day doses of dacarbazine, altretamine, nitrosoureas, streptozocin, cisplatin, carboplatin, or oxaliplatin

Trial Contact Information

Trial Lead Organizations/Sponsors

Joseph Roscoe

National Cancer Institute

Joseph A. RoscoePrincipal Investigator

Link to the current ClinicalTrials.gov record.
NLM Identifer NCT00475085
ClinicalTrials.gov processed this data on September 16, 2014

Note: Information about this trial is from the ClinicalTrials.gov database. The versions designated for health professionals and patients contain the same text. Minor changes may be made to the ClinicalTrials.gov record to standardize the names of study sponsors, sites, and contacts. Cancer.gov only lists sites that are recruiting patients for active trials, whereas ClinicalTrials.gov lists all sites for all trials. Questions and comments regarding the presented information should be directed to ClinicalTrials.gov.