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Selected Vegetables/Sun's Soup (PDQ®)

  • Last Modified: 02/05/2014

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Laboratory/Animal/Preclinical Studies

Only limited information is available from laboratory or animal studies of Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup. The developer’s patent document describes four animal experiments that used two mouse tumor models (mouse sarcoma S1509a, which was used in three of the experiments, and mouse Line 1 lung carcinoma, which was used in one experiment) and that evaluated shiitake mushroom (Lentinus edodes [Berk.] Singer), mung bean (Phaseolus radiatus L.), Hedyotis diffusa Willd., and barbat skullcap ( Scutellaria barbata D. Don).[1]

In these experiments, small groups of mice were fed either standard laboratory chow or laboratory chow that had been mixed with one or more of the four named substances. The mice were fed these diets both before and after they received subcutaneous injections of tumor cells. Results presented in the patent document show that tumor growth was slower in mice fed the experimental diets (i.e., containing the substances) than in mice fed standard laboratory chow. However, the greatest inhibition of tumor growth (up to 85% inhibition) was observed in animals fed diets that contained both mung bean and shiitake mushroom.

Results of two additional animal experiments were reported by the developer in a peer-reviewed scientific journal.[2] One experiment was a repetition of the Line 1 lung carcinoma experiment that was described in the developer’s patent document. The results of this experiment were similar to those reported previously: tumor growth was slower in animals fed the experimental diets, with the greatest inhibition of tumor growth (up to 82% inhibition) observed in animals fed a diet that contained both mung bean and shiitake mushroom.

The second experiment also used the Line 1 lung carcinoma tumor model. In this experiment, tumor growth was measured in mice fed either standard laboratory chow or a mixture of standard laboratory chow and DSV (i.e., the commercially available freeze-dried formulation of Selected Vegetables/Sun’s Soup; refer to the General Information section of this summary for more information). Tumor growth was approximately 2.3 times slower (i.e., approximately 65% growth inhibition) in mice fed standard laboratory chow plus DSV than in mice fed standard laboratory chow alone.

References
  1. Sun AS: Herbal Treatment of Malignancy. US Patent 5437866. August 1, 1995. Washington, DC: US Patent and Trademark Office, 1995. Available online. Last accessed February 5, 2014. 

  2. Sun AS, Yeh HC, Wang LH, et al.: Pilot study of a specific dietary supplement in tumor-bearing mice and in stage IIIB and IV non-small cell lung cancer patients. Nutr Cancer 39 (1): 85-95, 2001.  [PUBMED Abstract]