In English | En español
Questions About Cancer? 1-800-4-CANCER

Spirituality in Cancer Care (PDQ®)

  • Last Modified: 09/20/2012

Page Options

  • Print This Page
  • Print This Document
  • View Entire Document
  • Email This Document

Increasing Personal Awareness in Health Care Providers

Spirituality, religion, death, and dying may be experienced by many providers as a taboo subject. The meaning of illness and the possibility of death are often difficult to address. The assessment resources noted above may be of value in introducing the topic of spiritual concerns, death, and dying to a patient in a supportive manner. In addition, reading clinical accounts by other health care providers can be very helpful. One such example is a qualitative study utilizing an autoethnographic approach to explore spirituality in members of an interdisciplinary palliative care team. Findings from this work yielded a collective spirituality that emerged from the common goals, values, and belonging shared by team members. Reflections of the participants offer insights into patient care for other health care professionals.[1]

References
  1. Sinclair S, Raffin S, Pereira J, et al.: Collective soul: the spirituality of an interdisciplinary palliative care team. Palliat Support Care 4 (1): 13-24, 2006.  [PUBMED Abstract]