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Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)

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Treatment of Relapsed Childhood ALL

Prognostic Factors After First Relapse of Childhood ALL
        Site of relapse
        Time from diagnosis to relapse
        Patient characteristics
        Risk group classification at initial diagnosis
        Response to reinduction therapy
        Cytogenetics/genomic alterations
        Immunophenotype
Standard Treatment Options for First Bone Marrow Relapse of Childhood ALL
        Reinduction chemotherapy
        Postreinduction therapy for patients achieving a second complete remission
Standard Treatment for Second and Subsequent Bone Marrow Relapse
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for First and Subsequent Bone Marrow Relapse
        Components of the transplantation process
        Intrathecal medication after HSCT to prevent relapse
        Relapse after allogeneic HSCT for relapsed ALL
Treatment of Isolated Extramedullary Relapse
        CNS relapse
        Testicular relapse
Treatment Options Under Clinical Evaluation for Relapsed Childhood ALL
        COG trials for ALL in first relapse
        Other trials for ALL in first relapse
        Trials for ALL in second or subsequent relapse
        Current Clinical Trials



Prognostic Factors After First Relapse of Childhood ALL

The prognosis for a child with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) whose disease recurs depends on multiple factors.[1-14]; [15][Level of evidence: 3iiDi]

The two most important prognostic risk factors after first relapse of childhood ALL are the following:

Other prognostic factors include the following:

Site of relapse

Patients who have isolated extramedullary relapse fare better than those who have relapse involving the marrow. In some studies, patients with combined marrow/extramedullary relapse have a better prognosis than those with a marrow relapse.[5,13]

Time from diagnosis to relapse

For patients with relapsed B-precursor ALL, early relapses fare worse than later relapses, and marrow relapses fare worse than isolated extramedullary relapses. For example, survival rates range from less than 20% for patients with marrow relapses occurring within 18 months from diagnosis to 40% to 50% for those whose relapses occur more than 36 months from diagnosis.[5,13]

For patients with isolated central nervous system (CNS) relapses, the overall survival (OS) rates for early relapse (<18 months from diagnosis) are 40% to 50% and 75% to 80% for those with late relapses (>18 months from diagnosis).[13,16] No evidence exists that early detection of relapse by frequent surveillance (complete blood counts or bone marrow tests) in off-therapy patients improves outcome.[17]

Patient characteristics

Age 10 years and older at diagnosis has been reported as an independent predictor of poor outcome.[13] A Children’s Oncology Group (COG) study further showed that although patients aged 10 to 15 years at initial diagnosis do worse than patients aged 1 to 9 years (35% vs. 48%, 3-year postrelapse survival), those older than age 15 years did much worse (3-year OS, 15%; P = .001).[18]

The Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (BFM) group has also reported that high peripheral blast counts (>10,000/μL) at the time of relapse were associated with inferior outcomes in patients with late marrow relapses.[10]

Children with Down syndrome with relapse of ALL had inferior outcomes as reported in a BFM report before 2000, primarily due to increased induction deaths and treatment-related mortality. However, since 2000, with improvements in supportive care, there have been no differences in outcome between patients with and without Down syndrome.[19]

Risk group classification at initial diagnosis

The COG reported that risk group classification at the time of initial diagnosis was prognostically significant after relapse; patients who met National Cancer Institute (NCI) standard-risk criteria at initial diagnosis fared better after relapse than did NCI high-risk patients.[13]

Response to reinduction therapy

Patients with marrow relapses who have persistent morphologic disease at the end of the first month of reinduction therapy have an extremely poor prognosis, even if they subsequently achieve a second complete remission (CR2).[20][Level of evidence: 2Di]; [21][Level of evidence: 3iiiA] Several studies have demonstrated that minimal residual disease (MRD) levels after the achievement of CR2 are of prognostic significance in relapsed ALL.[20,22-24]; [25][Level of evidence: 3iiiDi] High levels of MRD at the end of reinduction and at later time points have been correlated with an extremely high risk of subsequent relapse.

Cytogenetics/genomic alterations

TP53 alterations (mutations and/or copy number alterations) are observed in approximately 11% of patients with ALL at first relapse and have been associated with an increased likelihood of persistent leukemia after initial reinduction (38.5% TP53 alteration vs. 12.5% TP53 wild-type) and poor event-free survival (EFS) (9% TP53 alteration vs. 49% TP53 wild-type). Approximately one-half of the TP53 alterations were present at initial diagnosis and half were newly observed at time of relapse.[26] A second genomic alteration found to predict for poor prognosis in patients with B-precursor ALL in first bone marrow relapse is IKZF1 deletion.[27] The frequency of IKZF1 deletion in B-precursor ALL patients at first relapse patients was 33% in patients in the Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapse (ALL-REZ) BFM 2002 study, which was approximately twice as high as the frequency described in children at initial diagnosis of ALL.[27]

Patients with ETV6-RUNX1-positive ALL appear to have a relatively favorable prognosis at first relapse, consistent with the high percentage of such patients who relapse more than 36 months after diagnosis.[27,28] In the ALL-REZ BFM 2002 study, an EFS of 84% (± 7%, SE) was observed for patients with ETV6-RUNX1 ALL with bone marrow relapse.[27] In this study, 94% of patients with ETV6-RUNX1 had a duration of first remission that extended at least 6 months beyond completion of their primary treatment, and on multivariate analysis, time to relapse (and not the presence of ETV6-RUNX1) was an independent predictor of outcome. Similarly, the 5-year OS for ETV6-RUNX1 patients enrolled on the French Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia (FRALLE) 93 study who relapsed at any site more than 36 months after diagnosis was 81%, and the presence of ETV6-RUNX1 was associated with a favorable survival outcome compared with other late relapsing patients.[28] However, the 3-year OS of ETV6-RUNX1 patients who experienced an early relapse (<36 months) was only 31%.

Immunophenotype

Immunophenotype is an important prognostic factor at relapse. Patients with T-cell ALL who experience a marrow relapse (isolated or combined) at any time during treatment or posttreatment are less likely to achieve a second remission and long-term EFS than are patients with B-cell ALL.[5,20]

Standard Treatment Options for First Bone Marrow Relapse of Childhood ALL

Standard treatment options for first bone marrow relapse include the following:

  1. Reinduction chemotherapy.
  2. Postreinduction therapy for patients achieving a CR2.
Reinduction chemotherapy

Initial treatment of relapse consists of reinduction therapy to achieve a CR2. Using either a four-drug reinduction regimen (similar to that administered to newly diagnosed high-risk patients) or an alternative regimen including high-dose methotrexate and high-dose cytarabine, approximately 85% of patients with a marrow relapse achieve a CR2 at the end of the first month of treatment.[5]; [29][Level of evidence: 2A]; [20][Level of evidence: 2Di] Patients with early marrow relapses have a lower rate of achieving a morphologic CR2 (approximately 70%) than do those with late marrow relapses (approximately 95%).[20,29]

Evidence (chemotherapy):

  1. A COG study used three blocks of intensive reinduction therapy with an initial four-drug combination including doxorubicin followed by two intensive consolidation blocks before either hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or chemotherapy continuation.[20]
    • Second remission was achieved after block 1 in 68% of patients with early relapse (<36 months from initial diagnosis) and in 96% of those with later relapse.

    • Blocks 2 and 3 reduced MRD in 40 of 56 patients who were MRD-positive after block 1.

  2. A United Kingdom–based randomized trial of ALL patients in first relapse compared reinduction with a four-drug combination using idarubicin versus mitoxantrone.[30][Level of evidence: 1iiA]
    • There was no difference in CR2 rates or end-reinduction MRD levels between the two study arms.

    • A significant improvement in OS in the mitoxantrone arm (69% vs. 45%, P = .007) due to decreased relapse after transplantation was reported.

    The potential benefit of mitoxantrone in relapsed ALL regimens requires further investigation.

  3. Investigators from the ALL-REZ BFM group used a six-drug reinduction approach, including high-dose methotrexate. A randomized comparison of 1 g/m2 of methotrexate versus 5 g/m2 of methotrexate with reinduction showed no advantage at the higher dose.[31]

  4. The combination of clofarabine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide was reported to induce remission in 42% to 56% of patients with refractory or multiply relapsed disease.[32,33]; [34][Level of evidence: 2A]

  5. The combination of bortezomib plus vincristine, dexamethasone, PEG-L-asparaginase, and doxorubicin was reported to induce complete response (with or without platelet recovery) in 80% of multiply relapsed patients with B-precursor ALL.[35][Level of evidence: 3iiiDiv] Notably, this trial did not include patients who were refractory to reinduction.

  6. In a study of induction therapy comprising intensive asparaginase (weekly PEG-L-asparaginase or 12 doses of E.coli asparaginase) with prednisone, vincristine, and doxorubicin for patients with first relapse, the second complete remission rate was 86% for those receiving PEG-L-asparaginase and 81% for those receiving E.coli asparaginase.[36][Level of evidence: 2Di]

T-cell ALL

Patients with relapsed T-cell ALL have much lower rates of achieving CR2 with standard reinduction regimens than do patients with B-precursor phenotype.[20] Treatment of children with first relapse of T-cell ALL in the bone marrow with single-agent therapy using the T-cell selective agent, nelarabine, has resulted in response rates of approximately 50%.[37] The combination of nelarabine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide has produced remissions in patients with relapsed/refractory T-cell ALL.[38]

Postreinduction therapy for patients achieving a second complete remission

Early-relapsing B-precursor ALL

For B-precursor patients with an early marrow relapse, allogeneic transplant from a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-identical sibling or matched unrelated donor that is performed in second remission has been reported in most studies to result in higher leukemia-free survival than a chemotherapy approach.[7,25,39-47] However, even with transplantation, the survival rate for patients with early marrow relapse is less than 50%. (Refer to the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for First and Subsequent Bone Marrow Relapse section of this summary for more information.)

Late-relapsing B-precursor ALL

For patients with a late marrow relapse of B-precursor ALL, a primary chemotherapy approach after achievement of CR2 has resulted in survival rates of approximately 50%, and it is not clear whether allogeneic transplantation is associated with superior cure rate.[5,9,30,48-50]; [51][Level of evidence: 3iiA] End-reinduction MRD levels may help to identify patients with a high risk of subsequent relapse if treated with chemotherapy alone (no HSCT) in CR2. Whether transplantation benefits patients with late marrow relapse but a high level of MRD after reinduction requires further study.

Evidence (MRD-based risk stratification for late-relapse of B-precursor ALL):

  1. In a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital study, which included 23 patients with late relapses treated with chemotherapy in CR2, the 2-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 49% for the 12 patients who were MRD-positive at the end of reinduction and 0% for the 11 patients who were MRD-negative.[22]

  2. In BFM studies, patients are considered to be intermediate risk if they have a late isolated marrow relapse or an early or late combined marrow/extramedullary relapse. In a study from this group of 61 children with intermediate-risk relapsed B-cell ALL treated with chemotherapy alone in CR2 (no hematopoietic stem cell transplantation [HSCT]), end-reinduction MRD (assessed by a polymerase chain reaction–based assay) significantly predicted outcome.[24]
    • Patients with low MRD (<10-3) had a 10-year EFS of 73%, while those with high MRD (>10-3) had a 10-year EFS of 10%. On multivariate analysis, end-reinduction MRD was the strongest independent prognostic factor.

T-cell ALL

For patients with T-cell ALL who achieved remission after bone marrow relapse, outcomes with postreinduction chemotherapy alone have generally been poor,[5] and these patients are usually treated with allogeneic HSCT in CR2, regardless of time to relapse.

Standard Treatment for Second and Subsequent Bone Marrow Relapse

Although there are no studies directly comparing chemotherapy with HSCT for patients in third or subsequent CR, because cure with chemotherapy alone is rare, transplant is generally considered a reasonable approach for those achieving remission. Long-term survival for all patients after a second relapse is particularly poor, in the range of less than 10% to 20%.[45] One of the main reasons for this is failure to obtain a third remission. In spite of numerous attempts at novel combination approaches, only about 40% of children with second relapse are able to achieve remission.[52] If these patients achieve CR, HSCT has been shown to cure 20% to 35%, with failures occurring due to high rates of relapse and transplant-related mortality.[53-57][Level of evidence: 3iiA]

Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for First and Subsequent Bone Marrow Relapse

Components of the transplantation process

An updated expert panel review of indications for HSCT has been published.[58] Components of the transplant process that have been shown to be important in improving or predicting outcome of HSCT for children with ALL include the following:

  1. Total-body irradiation (TBI)-containing transplant preparative regimens.
  2. MRD detection just before transplant.
  3. Donor type and HLA match.
  4. Immune modulation after transplant to prevent relapse.
TBI-containing transplant preparative regimens

For patients proceeding to allogeneic HSCT, TBI appears to be an important component of the conditioning regimen. Two retrospective studies and a randomized trial suggest that transplant conditioning regimens that include TBI produce higher cure rates than do chemotherapy-only preparative regimens.[39,59,60] Fractionated TBI (total dose, 12–14 Gy) is often combined with cyclophosphamide, etoposide, thiotepa, or a combination of these agents. Study findings with these combinations have generally resulted in similar rates of survival,[61-63] although one study suggested that if cyclophosphamide is used without other chemotherapy drugs, a dose of TBI in the higher range may be necessary.[64] Many standard regimens include cyclophosphamide with TBI dosing between 1.32 and 1.4 Gy. On the other hand, when cyclophosphamide and etoposide were used with TBI, doses above 1.2 Gy resulted in worse survival due to excessive toxicity.[62]

MRD detection just before transplant

Disease status at the time of transplantation has long been known to be an important predictor of outcome, with patients not in CR at HSCT having very poor survival rates.[65] Several studies have also demonstrated that the level of MRD at the time of transplant is a key risk factor in children with ALL in CR undergoing allogeneic HSCT.[23,66-70][Level of evidence: 3iiA] Survival rates of patients who are MRD-positive pretransplant have been reported between 20% and 47%, compared with 60% to 88% in patients who are MRD-negative.

When patients have received two to three cycles of chemotherapy in an attempt to achieve an MRD-negative remission, the benefit of further intensive therapy for achieving MRD negativity must be weighed against the potential for significant toxicity. In addition, there is not clear evidence showing that MRD positivity in a patient who has received multiple cycles of therapy is a biological disease marker for poor outcome that cannot be modified, or whether further intervention bringing such patients into an MRD negative remission will overcome this risk factor and improve survival. Several study groups are attempting to answer this question.

Donor type and HLA match

Survival rates after matched unrelated donor and umbilical cord blood transplantations have improved significantly over the past decade and offer an outcome similar to that obtained with matched sibling donor transplants.[43,71-74]; [75][Level of evidence: 2A]; [76][Level of evidence: 3iiiA]; [77][Level of evidence: 3iiiDii] Rates of clinically extensive graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and treatment-related mortality remain higher after unrelated donor transplantation compared with matched sibling donor transplants.[44,53,71] However, there is some evidence that matched unrelated donor transplantation may yield a lower relapse rate, and National Marrow Donor Program and Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) analyses have demonstrated that rates of GVHD, treatment-related mortality, and OS have improved over time.[78]; [79,80][Level of evidence: 3iiA]

Another CIBMTR study suggests that outcome after one or two antigen mismatched cord blood transplants may be equivalent to that for a matched family donor or a matched unrelated donor.[81] In certain cases in which no suitable donor is found or an immediate transplant is considered crucial, a haploidentical transplant utilizing large doses of stem cells may be considered.[82] For T cell-depleted CD34-selected haploidentical transplants in which a parent is the donor, patients receiving maternal stem cells may have a better outcome than those who receive paternal stem cells.[83][Level of evidence: 3iiA]

Immune modulation after transplant to prevent relapse

A number of approaches to prevent relapse after transplantation have been studied, including withdrawal of immune suppression or donor lymphocyte infusion and targeted immunotherapies, such as monoclonal antibodies and natural killer cell therapy.[84,85] Trials in Europe and the United States have shown that patients defined as having a high risk of relapse based upon increasing recipient chimerism (i.e., increased percentage of recipient DNA markers) can successfully undergo withdrawal of immune suppression without excessive toxicity.[86] One study showed that in 46 patients with increasing recipient chimerism, the 31 patients who underwent immune suppression withdrawal, donor lymphocyte infusion, or both therapies had a 3-year EFS of 37% versus 0% in the nonintervention group (P < .001).[87]

Intrathecal medication after HSCT to prevent relapse

The use of post-HSCT intrathecal chemotherapy chemoprophylaxis is controversial.[88-91]

Relapse after allogeneic HSCT for relapsed ALL

For patients relapsing after an allogeneic HSCT for ALL, a second ablative allogeneic HSCT may be feasible. However, many patients will be unable to undergo a second HSCT procedure because of failure to achieve remission, early toxic death, or severe organ toxicity related to salvage chemotherapy.[92] Among the highly selected group of patients able to undergo a second ablative allogeneic HSCT, approximately 10% to 30% may achieve long-term EFS.[92-94]; [57,95][Level of evidence: 3iiA] Prognosis is more favorable in patients with longer duration of remission after the first HSCT and in patients with CR at the time of the second HSCT.[93,94,96] In addition, one study showed an improvement in survival after second HSCT if acute GVHD occurred, especially if it had not occurred after the first transplant.[97]

Reduced-intensity approaches can also cure a percentage of patients when used as a second allogeneic transplant approach, but only if patients achieve a CR confirmed by flow cytometry.[98][Level of evidence: 2A] Donor leukocyte infusion has limited benefit for patients with ALL who relapse after allogeneic HSCT.[99]; [100][Level of evidence: 3iiiA]

Whether a second allogeneic transplant is necessary to treat isolated CNS and testicular relapse is unknown, and a small series has shown survival in selected patients using chemotherapy alone or chemotherapy followed by a second transplant.[101][Level of evidence: 3iA]

Treatment of Isolated Extramedullary Relapse

With improved success in treating children with ALL, the incidence of isolated extramedullary relapse has decreased. The incidence of isolated CNS relapse is less than 5%, and testicular relapse is less than 1% to 2%.[102-104] As with bone marrow and mixed relapses, time from initial diagnosis to relapse is a key prognostic factor in isolated extramedullary relapses.[105] In addition, age older than 6 years at diagnosis was noted to be an adverse prognostic factor for patients with an isolated extramedullary relapse in one study.[106] Of note, in the majority of children with isolated extramedullary relapses, submicroscopic marrow disease can be demonstrated using sensitive molecular techniques,[107] and successful treatment strategies must effectively control both local and systemic disease. Patients with an isolated CNS relapse who show greater than 0.01% MRD in a morphologically normal marrow have a worse prognosis (5-year EFS, 30%) than do patients with either no MRD or MRD less than 0.01% (5-year EFS, 60%).[107]

CNS relapse

Standard treatment options for childhood ALL that has recurred in the CNS include the following:

  1. Systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy.

  2. Cranial or craniospinal radiation.

While the prognosis for children with isolated CNS relapse had been quite poor in the past, aggressive systemic and intrathecal therapy followed by cranial or craniospinal radiation has improved the outlook, particularly for patients who did not receive cranial radiation during their first remission.[16,105,108,109]

Evidence (chemotherapy and radiation therapy):

  1. In a Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) study using this strategy, children who had not previously received radiation therapy and whose initial remission was 18 months or longer had a 4-year EFS rate of approximately 80%, compared with EFS rates of approximately 45% for children with CNS relapse within 18 months of diagnosis.[105]

  2. In a follow-up POG study, children who had not previously received radiation therapy and who had initial remission of 18 months or more were treated with intensive systemic and intrathecal chemotherapy for 1 year followed by 18 Gy of cranial radiation only.[16] The 4-year EFS was 78%. Children with an initial remission of less than 18 months also received the same chemotherapy but had craniospinal radiation (24 Gy cranial/15 Gy spinal) as in the first POG study and achieved a 4-year EFS of 52%.

A number of case series describing HSCT in the treatment of isolated CNS relapse have been published.[110,111] The use of transplantation to treat isolated CNS relapse occurring less than 18 months from diagnosis, especially T-cell CNS relapse, requires further study.

Evidence (HSCT):

  1. In a study comparing outcome of patients treated with either HLA-matched sibling transplants or chemoradiation therapy as in the POG studies above, 8-year probabilities of leukemia-free survival adjusted for age and duration of first remission were similar (58% and 66%, respectively).[112][Level of evidence: 3iiiDii] This retrospective, registry-based study included transplantation of both early (<18 months from diagnosis) and late relapses.
    • Because of the relatively good outcome of patients with isolated CNS relapse more than 18 months from diagnosis treated with chemoradiation therapy alone (>75%), transplantation is generally not recommended for this group.

Testicular relapse

The results of treatment of isolated testicular relapse depend on the timing of the relapse. The 3-year EFS of boys with overt testicular relapse during therapy is approximately 40%; it is approximately 85% for boys with late testicular relapse.[113]

Standard treatment options in North America for childhood ALL that has recurred in the testes include the following:

  1. Chemotherapy.

  2. Radiation therapy.

The standard approach for treating isolated testicular relapse in North America is to administer intensive chemotherapy that includes high-dose methotrexate.[114] Patients who do not respond with a CR after induction also receive local radiation therapy.

In some European clinical trial groups, orchiectomy of the involved testicle is performed instead of radiation. Biopsy of the other testicle is performed at the time of relapse to determine if additional local control (surgical removal or radiation) is to be performed. A study that looked at testicular biopsy at the end of frontline therapy failed to demonstrate a survival benefit for patients with early detection of occult disease.[115] While there are limited clinical data concerning outcome without the use of radiation therapy or orchiectomy, the use of chemotherapy (e.g., high-dose methotrexate) that may be able to achieve antileukemic levels in the testes is being tested in clinical trials.

Evidence (treatment of testicular relapse [case reports]):

  1. Dutch investigators treated five boys with a late testicular relapse with high-dose methotrexate during induction (12 g/m2) and at regular intervals during the remainder of therapy (6 g/m2) without testicular radiation. All five boys were long-term survivors.[114]

  2. In a small series of boys who had an isolated testicular relapse after a HSCT for a prior systemic relapse of ALL, five of seven boys had extended EFS without a second HSCT.[101][Level of evidence: 3iA]

Treatment Options Under Clinical Evaluation for Relapsed Childhood ALL

Treatment options under clinical evaluation include the following:

COG trials for ALL in first relapse

The COG has divided patients with first relapse into three risk categories as outlined in Table 4. Clinical trials in some risk categories are available.

Table 4. Children's Oncology Group ALL Relapse Risk Stratification for B-Precursor ALLa
 Isolated CNS or Testicular Relapse  Bone Marrow or Combined Relapse 
<18 months from diagnosisIntermediate riskHigh risk
18–36 months from diagnosisLow riskHigh risk
>36 months from diagnosisLow riskIntermediate risk

ALL = acute lymphoblastic leukemia; CNS = central nervous system.
aAll relapsed T-cell ALL is considered high risk.

  1. COG-AALL07P1 (Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed ALL or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma): Patients with marrow relapse of T-cell ALL and early marrow relapse (<36 months) of B-precursor ALL are eligible for this study. This is a phase II pilot study to determine the feasibility and safety of adding bortezomib to intensive reinduction chemotherapy. Bortezomib is a proteasome inhibitor that has been shown to sensitize leukemic cells to apoptosis induced by chemotherapy.

Other trials for ALL in first relapse
  1. TACL 2008-002 (NCT00981799) (Trial of Nelarabine, Etoposide, and Cyclophosphamide in Relapsed T-cell ALL and T-cell Lymphoblastic Lymphoma): This trial, conducted by the Therapeutic Advances in Childhood Leukemia & Lymphoma clinical trials group, is testing the feasibility of administering nelarabine in combination with cyclophosphamide and etoposide as reinduction for patients with T-cell ALL in first relapse (as well as those who failed primary induction therapy). Doses of nelarabine and cyclophosphamide will be escalated in successive cohorts of patients to determine the maximum tolerated doses of these drugs when given in combination.

  2. DFCI-11-237 (NCT01523977) (Everolimus With Multiagent Reinduction Chemotherapy in Pediatric Patients With ALL): Patients in first relapse are eligible to enroll on a Dana-Farber Cancer Institute ALL Consortium trial testing the feasibility of administering everolimus, an oral mTOR inhibitor, in combination with multiagent reinduction (vincristine, prednisone, doxorubicin, intravenous PEG-L-asparaginase, and intrathecal chemotherapy).

Trials for ALL in second or subsequent relapse
  1. NCT01471782 (Clinical Study With Blinatumomab in Pediatric and Adolescent Patients With Relapsed/Refractory B-Precursor ALL): This is a phase I and II trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of blinatumomab, the CD3-CD19–binding molecule, in recruiting autologous T-cells to treat relapsed B-cell ALL.

  2. COG-ADVL1114 (NCT01403415) (Temsirolimus, Dexamethasone, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, Vincristine Sulfate, and Pegaspargase in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed ALL or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma [NHL]): This is a phase I trial to determine the feasibility and safety of adding three doses of temsirolimus (intravenously) to the United Kingdom ALL R3 induction regimen for patients with relapsed ALL and NHL.

Multiple clinical trials investigating new agents and new combinations of agents are available for children with second or subsequent relapsed or refractory ALL and should be considered. These trials are testing targeted treatments specific for ALL, including monoclonal antibody–based therapies and drugs that inhibit signal transduction pathways required for leukemia cell growth and survival.

Current Clinical Trials

Check for U.S. clinical trials from NCI's list of cancer clinical trials that are now accepting patients with recurrent childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The list of clinical trials can be further narrowed by location, drug, intervention, and other criteria.

General information about clinical trials is also available from the NCI Web site.

References
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