Treatment Clinical Trials for Breast Neoplasm

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for breast neoplasm treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 451-475 of 476

  • Paclitaxel, Trastuzumab, and Pertuzumab with or without Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with or without pembrolizumab works in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving paclitaxel, trastuzumab, and pertuzumab with pembrolizumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: NRG Oncology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Ribociclib and Aromatase Inhibitor in Treating Older Participants with Hormone Receptor Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase IIA trial studies the side effects of ribociclib and aromatase inhibitor and how well they work in treating participants with hormone receptor positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Ribociclib and aromatase inhibitors may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 4 locations

  • G1T48, an Oral SERD, in ER-Positive, HER2-Negative Advanced Breast Cancer

    This is a study to investigate the potential clinical benefit of G1T48 as an oral selective estrogen receptor degrader (SERD) in patients with estrogen receptor-positive, HER2-negative metastatic breast cancer. The study is an open-label design, consisting of 2 parts: dose-finding portion (Part 1), and expansion portion (Part 2). Both parts include 3 study phases: Screening Phase, Treatment Phase, and Survival Follow-up Phase. The Treatment Phase begins on the day of first dose with study treatment and completes at the Post-Treatment Visit. Approximately, 96 patients will be enrolled in the study.
    Location: UNC Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina

  • Radiofrequency Tagged Surgery in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well radiofrequency tagged surgery works in treating patients with breast cancer. Tagging radiofrequency markers to lymph nodes in the area of the armpit (axilla) to which cancer has spread may help doctors more accurately identify lymph nodes for removal.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Phase I Trial of Endoxifen Gel versus Placebo in Women Undergoing Breast Surgery

    This randomized phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of Z-endoxifen hydrochloride in treating participants who are undergoing breast surgery. Z-endoxifen hydrochloride may treat or reduce the risk of breast cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Endocrine Therapy in Treating Patients with HER2 Negative, Low Risk Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase IV trial studies how well endocrine therapy works in treating patients with HER2 negative, low risk breast cancer. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Endocrine therapies such as aromatase inhibitors and selective estrogen receptor modulators may lessen the amount of estrogen made by the body.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Regional Radiation Therapy with or without Whole Breast Irradiation in Treating Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive, HER2 Negative Low Risk Breast Cancer Who Have Undergone Breast Conserving Surgery or Mastectomy

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well regional radiation therapy with or without whole breast irradiation works in treating patients with estrogen receptor positive, HER2 negative low risk breast cancer who have undergone breast conserving surgery or mastectomy. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving radiation therapy to the whole breast / chest area with or without radiation therapy to the surrounding lymph glands (called regional radiotherapy) may help researchers to know whether not giving regional radiation therapy is just as good as using regional radiation therapy.
    Location: Location information is not yet available.

  • Anti-M-CSF Monoclonal Antibody MCS110, Dose-Dense Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Estrogen Receptor Positive and HER2 Negative Stage II-III Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of anti-M-CSF monoclonal antibody MCS110 when giving together with dose-dense doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel in treating patients with estrogen receptor positive and HER2 negative stage II-III breast cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as anti-M-CSF monoclonal antibody MCS110, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving anti-M-CSF monoclonal antibody MCS110, doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, and paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Imipramine Hydrochloride before Surgery in Treating Patients with Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This pilot phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of imipramine hydrochloride before surgery and to see how well it works in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer. Imipramine hydrochloride is a tricyclic antidepressant that may be effective in decreasing the proliferation (multiplying) rate of triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • Stellate Ganglion Blockade with Bupivacaine Hydrochloride in Reducing Hot Flashes in Hispanic Patients with Breast Cancer

    This randomized pilot clinical trial studies how well a stellate ganglion blockade with bupivacaine hydrochloride works in reducing hot flashes in Hispanic patients with breast cancer. A stellate ganglion blockade using bupivacaine hydrochloride (a local anesthetic used to block signals at nerve endings) may help to reduce the number and severity of hot flashes in Hispanic patients with breast cancer.
    Location: Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin before Surgery in Treating Nigerian Women with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel works with carboplatin before surgery in treating Nigerian women with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Alisertib with or without Fulvestrant in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic, Endocrine-Resistant Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well alisertib with or without fulvestrant works in treating patients with endocrine-resistant breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Alisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hormone therapy using fulvestrant may fight breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen by the tumor cells or reducing the amount of estrogen made by the body. Giving alisertib with or without fulvestrant may work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Durvalumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Stage I-III Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of durvalumab when given together with paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide and to see how well they work in treating patients with stage I-III breast cancer that does not have estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or large amounts of human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER)2 / neu protein. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving durvalumab together with paclitaxel albumin-stabilized nanoparticle formulation, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut

  • Viral Therapy In Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck Cancer or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of viral therapy in treating patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck that has returned (come back) after a period of improvement or has spread to other parts of the body or breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. A virus called encoding thyroidal sodium iodide symporter, which has been changed in a certain way, may be able to kill tumor cells without damaging normal cells.
    Location: Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota

  • Chemotherapy with or without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with HER2 Positive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without metformin hydrochloride work in treating patients with HER2 positive breast cancer that can be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, carboplatin, trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and pegfilgrastim, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Metformin hydrochloride may prevent or lower risk of breast cancer and decrease cancer cells, lower risk of cancer spreading. It is not yet known whether giving metformin hydrochloride with chemotherapy will work better in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, Tocilizumab in Treating Participants with Metastatic or Unresectable HER2 Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of trastuzumab, pertuzumab and tocilizumab in treating participants with HER2 positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies such as trastuzumab, pertuzumab and tocilizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Pembrolizumab and Binimetinib in Treating Patients with Locally Advanced or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the best dose of pembrolizumab and binimetinib and how well it works when giving together with pembrolizumab in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Binimetinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pembrolizumab and binimetinib may work better in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Florida, Jacksonville, Florida

  • Veliparib and Atezolizumab Either Alone or in Combination in Treating Patients with Stage III-IV Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well veliparib and atezolizumab work either alone or in combination in treating patients with stage III-IV triple negative breast cancer. Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not known whether giving veliparib and atezolizumab either alone or in combination would work better in patients with triple negative breast cancer.
    Location: 36 locations

  • 18F-FBnTP Positron Emission Mammography in Detecting Breast Cancer in Patients with Intraductal Breast Cancer

    This clinical trial studies how well 18F-FBnTP positron emission mammography works in detecting breast cancer in patients with intraductal breast cancer. 18F-FBnTP positron emission mammography may detect may detect breast lesions with better sensitivity and better specificity.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • S1222 Trial (Everolimus, Anastrozole and Fulvestrant) in Post-Menopausal Stage IV Breast Cancer

    This randomized Phase III trial studies how well the combination of fulvestrant and everolimus together or the combination of anastrozole, fulvestrant and everolimus together, improve progression-free survival (PFS) versus fulvestrant alone.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Vandetanib in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well vandetanib works in treating patients with breast cancer. Vandetanib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Iowa / Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, Iowa City, Iowa

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well ruxolitinib phosphate works in treating patients with breast cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or to other places in the body and that cannot be removed by surgery. Ruxolitinib phosphate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage IB-IIIA Breast Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies the side effects of vaccine therapy in treating patients with stage IB-IIIA breast cancer. Vaccines made from peptides and immune stimulant may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Cabozantinib in Treating Patients with Hormone Receptor-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer with Bone Involvement

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects and how well cabozantinib-s-malate (cabozantinib) works alone and in combination with fulvestrant (pilot cohort) in treating patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer that has spread to the bone. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Hormone therapy using fulvestrant may fight breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen by the tumor cells. Giving cabozantinib-s-malate and fulvestrant together may be a better treatment for patients with hormone-receptor positive breast cancer.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Letrozole Before Surgery in Treating Post-Menopausal Patients With Stage I-III Hormone-Sensitive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    This clinical trial studies letrozole before surgery in treating post-menopausal patients with stage I-III hormone-sensitive breast cancer that can be removed by surgery. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Hormone therapy using letrozole may fight breast cancer by lowering the amount of estrogen the body makes. Giving letrozole before surgery may reduce the amount of tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee