Treatment Clinical Trials for Merkel Cell Cancer

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for Merkel cell cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-14 of 14
  • An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study to Investigate the Safety and Effectiveness of Nivolumab, and Nivolumab Combination Therapy in Virus-associated Tumors

    The purpose of this study to investigate the safety and effectiveness of Nivolumab, and Nivolumab combination therapy, to treat patients who have virus-associated tumors. Certain viruses have been known to play a role in tumor formation and growth. This study will investigate the effects of the study drugs, in patients who have the following types of tumors: - Anal canal cancer - Cervical cancer - Epstein Barr Virus (EBV) positive gastric cancer - HPV positive and negative squamous cell cancer of the head and neck (SCCHN) - Merkel Cell Cancer - Nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) - Penile cancer - Vaginal and vulvar cancer
    Location: 11 locations

  • Avelumab in Subjects With Merkel Cell Carcinoma (JAVELIN Merkel 200)

    This is a multicenter, international, single-arm, open-label, Phase 2 trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of avelumab in subjects with metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC).
    Location: 5 locations

  • PEN-221 in Somatostatin Receptor 2 Expressing Advanced Cancers Including Neuroendocrine and Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Protocol PEN-221-001 is an open-label, multicenter Phase 1 / 2a study evaluating PEN-221 in patients with SSTR2 expressing advanced gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) or lung or thymus or other neuroendocrine tumors or small cell lung cancer or large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma of the lung.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Trial of Intratumoral Injections of TTI-621 in Subjects With Relapsed and Refractory Solid Tumors and Mycosis Fungoides

    This is a multicenter, open-label, phase 1 study that is being done to test intratumoral injections of TTI-621 in subjects that have relapsed and refractory percutaneously accessible solid tumors or mycosis fungoides. The study will be performed in two different parts. Part 1 is the Dose Escalation phase and Part 2 is the Dose Expansion phase. The purpose of this study is to characterize the safety profile of TTI-621 and to determine the optimal dose and delivery schedule of TTI-621.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec with or without Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Melanoma, Merkel Cell Carcinoma, or Other Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of talimogene laherparepvec and to see how well it works with or without hypofractionated radiation therapy in treating patients with skin melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma, or other solid tumors that have spread to places not suitable for surgical removal. Drugs used in the immunotherapy, such as talimogene laherparepvec, may stimulate the body's immune system to fight tumor cells. Hypofractionated radiation therapy delivers higher doses of radiation therapy over a shorter period of time and may kill more tumor cells and have fewer side effects. It is not yet known if giving talimogene laherparepvec with or without hypofractionated radiation therapy will work better in treating patients with cutaneous melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma, or solid tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cisplatin or Carboplatin and Etoposide With or Without Vandetanib in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer or High-Grade or Poorly Undifferentiated Neuroendocrine Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide with or without vandetanib works in treating patients with previously untreated extensive stage small cell lung cancer or high-grade or poorly differentiated neuroendocrine cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Vandetanib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide is more effective with or without vandetanib in treating small cell lung cancer or neuroendocrine cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients with Rare Solid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab and bevacizumab work in treating patients with rare solid tumors. Monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab and bevacizumab block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab with or without Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Stage IV Merkel Cell Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well nivolumab and ipilimumab with or without stereotactic body radiation therapy work in treating patients with Merkel cell cancer that has come back or is stage IV. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends x-rays directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving nivolumab and ipilimumab with or without stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with Merkel cell cancer.
    Location: Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida

  • Talimogene Laherparepvec and Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Refractory Lymphomas or Advanced or Refractory Non-melanoma Skin Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well talimogene laherparepvec works and nivolumab in treating patients with lymphomas that do not responded to treatment or non-melanoma skin cancers that have spread to other places in the body or do not responded to treatment. Biological therapies, such as talimogene laherparepvec, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may block a protein needed by tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving talimogene laherparepvec and nivolumab may work better in treating patients with lymphomas or non-melanoma skin cancers.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Phase 1 / 2 Study of In Situ Vaccination With Tremelimumab and IV Durvalumab Plus PolyICLC in Subjects With Advanced, Measurable, Biopsy-accessible Cancers

    This is an open-label, multicenter Phase 1 / 2 study of the CTLA-4 antibody, tremelimumab, and the PD-L1 antibody, durvalumab (MEDI4736), in combination with the tumor microenvironment (TME) modulator polyICLC, a TLR3 agonist, in subjects with advanced, measurable, biopsy-accessible cancers.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Localized Radiation Therapy or Recombinant Interferon Beta and Avelumab with or without Cellular Adoptive Immunotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well localized radiation therapy or recombinant interferon beta and avelumab with or without cellular adoptive immunotherapy works in treating patients with Merkel cell carcinoma that has spread to other parts of the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Interferon beta is a substance that can improve the body’s natural response and may interfere with the growth of tumor cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may help T lymphocytes kill tumor cells. For cellular adoptive immunotherapy, specific white blood cells are collected from the patient's blood and treated in the laboratory to recognize Merkel cell carcinoma. Infusing these cells back into the patient may help the body build an effective immune response to kill Merkel cell carcinoma. Giving localized radiation therapy or recombinant interferon beta and avelumab with or without cellular adoptive immunotherapy may be a better treatment for Merkel cell carcinoma.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Sapanisertib in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Merkel Cell Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of sapanisertib and to see how well it works in treating patients with merkel cell cancer that has come back after a period of time during which the cancer could not be detected or has spread to other parts of the body. Sapanisertib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

  • A Study of RO7198457 (Personalized Cancer Vaccine [PCV]) as a Single Agent and in Combination With Atezolizumab in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Tumors

    This is a Phase 1a / 1b, open-label, multicenter, global, dose-escalation study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immune response, and pharmacokinetics of RO7198457 as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab (MPDL3280A, an engineered anti-programmed death-ligand 1 [anti-PD-L1] antibody).
    Location: University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, Colorado

  • Adjuvant Avelumab in Merkel Cell Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well avelumab works in treating patients with Merkel cell cancer that has spread to the lymph nodes and have undergone surgery with or without radiation therapy. Monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may stimulate the immune system and interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington