Treatment Clinical Trials for Mesothelioma

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for mesothelioma treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 41
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  • Atezolizumab, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Surgery with or without Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage I-III Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma

    This phase I pilot trial studies how well atezolizumab, pemetrexed disodium, cisplatin, and surgery with or without radiation therapy works in treating patients with stage I-III pleural malignant mesothelioma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Pemetrexed disodium may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving atezolizumab, pemetrexed disodium, and cisplatin before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Giving atezolizumab after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells.
    Location: 156 locations

  • Pembrolizumab with or without Anetumab Ravtansine in Treating Patients with Mesothelin-Positive Pleural Mesothelioma

    This randomized phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well pembrolizumab with or without anetumab ravtansine work in treating patients with mesothelin-positive pleural mesothelioma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as anetumab ravtansine and pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Surgery, Chemotherapy, and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage I-III Pleural Mesothelioma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of surgery, chemotherapy, and intensity modulated radiation therapy in treating patients with stage I-III pleural mesothelioma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pemetrexed disodium, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer, either by killing the cancer cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Intensity modulated radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving chemotherapy before radiation therapy may help kill more tumor cells after surgery.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Methoxyamine, Cisplatin, and Pemetrexed Disodium in Treating Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors or Mesothelioma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery or Mesothelioma That Is Refractory to Pemetrexed Disodium and Cisplatin or Carboplatin

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of methoxyamine when given together with cisplatin and pemetrexed disodium and to see how well it works in treating patients with solid tumors or mesothelioma that have spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with standard treatment (advanced), or mesothelioma that does not respond to pemetrexed disodium and cisplatin or carboplatin (refractory). Methoxyamine may shrink the tumor and may also help cisplatin and pemetrexed disodium work better by making tumor cells more sensitive to the drugs. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin and pemetrexed disodium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving methoxyamine together with cisplatin and pemetrexed disodium may be a better treatment for solid tumors or mesothelioma than methoxyamine and pemetrexed disodium.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Ph 2 / 3 Study in Subjects With MPM w / Low ASS 1 Expression to Assess ADI-PEG 20 With Pemetrexed and Cisplatin

    This is a study of ADI-PEG 20 (pegylated arginine deiminase), an arginine degrading enzyme versus placebo in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma with low argininosuccinate synthetase 1 expression. Malignant pleural mesothelioma have been found to require arginine, an amino acid. Thus the hypothesis is that by restricting arginine with ADI-PEG 20, the malignant pleural mesothelioma cells will starve and die.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Safety Study of MGD009 in B7-H3-expressing Tumors

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety of MGD009 when given to patients with B7-H3-expressing tumors. The study will also evaluate what is the highest dose of MGD009 that can be given safely. Assessments will be done to see how the drug acts in the body (pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD) and to evaluate potential anti-tumor activity of MGD009.
    Location: 12 locations

  • A Dose-Escalation Study to Evaluate the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of IPI-549

    This dose-escalation study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamics of IPI-549 monotherapy and IPI-549 in combination with nivolumab in subjects with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Avelumab and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Malignant Mesothelioma

    This phase I / II trial studies how well avelumab and stereotactic body radiation therapy work in treating patients with malignant mesothelioma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as avelumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Stereotactic body radiation therapy uses special equipment to position a patient and deliver radiation to tumors with high precision. This method can kill tumor cells with fewer doses over a shorter period and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving avelumab and stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with malignant mesothelioma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Pevonedistat with or without Pemetrexed Disodium and Cisplatin in Treating Patients with Malignant Mesothelioma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of pevonedistat with or without pemetrexed disodium and cisplatin, and to see how well they work in treating patients with malignant mesothelioma. Pevonedistat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pemetrexed disodium and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pevonedistat, pemetrexed disodium, and cisplatin may work better in treating patients with malignant mesothelioma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Dose Escalation and Expansion Study of GSK3359609 in Subjects With Selected Advanced Solid Tumors (INDUCE-1)

    GSK3359609 is an anti-Inducible T cell Co-Stimulator (ICOS) receptor agonist antibody intended for the treatment of cancers of different histology. This is a first-time-in-human (FTIH), open-label, multicenter study designed to investigate the safety, pharmacology, and preliminary antitumor activity in subjects with advanced or recurrent solid tumors with the aim to establish recommended dose(s) of GSK3359609 for further exploration as monotherapy and in combination with pembrolizumab or chemotherapy regimens. The study is comprised of two primary parts, each composed of two phases: Part 1: GSK3359609 monotherapy with Part 1A as dose escalation phase and Part 1B as cohort expansion phase; Part 2: GSK3359609 combination therapy with Part 2A pembrolizumab or GSK3174998 combination dose escalation phase and Part 2B expansion phase with pembrolizumab. Part 2A GSK3359609 combinations with chemotherapy will only consist of safety run-in cohorts. Each part and phase of the study includes a screening period, a treatment period, and a follow-up period. The primary objective of the study is to determine the safety, tolerability, maximum tolerated dose or the maximum administered dose of GSK3359609 alone or in combination.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Minimally-Invasive Cytoreduction and Hyperthermic Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Low-Volume Peritoneal Carcinomatosis

    This phase I trial studies a minimally-invasive cytoreduction and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy in treating patients with a small amount (low-volume) of peritoneal carcinomatosis, which is a term used to describe the widespread of cancerous tumors in the peritoneal cavity. Minimally-invasive cytoreduction is a less invasive type of surgery for peritoneal carcinomatosis and may have fewer side effects and improve recovery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitomycin C, cisplatin, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Heating a chemotherapy solution and infusing it directly into the abdomen may kill more tumor cells. Giving minimally-invasive cytoreduction with hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy may work better in treating peritoneal carcinomatosis.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Phase 1 Study of INBRX-109 in Subjects With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors Including Sarcomas

    This is a first-in-human, open-label, non-randomized, two-part phase 1 trial of INBRX-109, which is a recombinant humanized multivalent antibody targeting the human death receptor 5 (DR5).
    Location: 4 locations

  • Tazemetostat Rollover Study (TRuST): An Open-Label Rollover Study

    This study will provide continuing availability to tazemetostat as a single agent to subjects who have completed their participation in an antecedent tazemetostat study (either with monotherapy or combination therapy). In addition, long-term safety and overall survival will be collected.
    Location: 5 locations

  • A Phase 1 / 2 Study to Investigate the Safety, Biologic and Anti-tumor Activity of ONCOS-102 in Combination With Durvalumab in Subjects With Advanced Peritoneal Malignancies

    This is a two-part Phase 1 / 2 dose escalation and dose expansion study of the GMCSFencoding adenovirus, ONCOS-102, in combination with anti-programmed death ligand-1 (PDL1) antibody, durvalumab, in adult subjects with peritoneal disease who have failed prior standard chemotherapy and have histologically confirmed platinum-resistant or refractory epithelial ovarian cancer or colorectal cancer.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Phase II Nivolumab and Ramucirumab for Patients With Previously-Treated Mesothelioma

    This study will evaluate the combination of Nivolumab and Ramucirumab in patients with previously-treated mesothelioma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • CBP501, Cisplatin and Nivolumab in Advanced Refractory Tumors

    This is a multicenter, open-label, phase 1b study of CBP501 / cisplatin / nivolumab combination administered once every 21 days to patients with advanced solid tumors.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Chemotherapy With or Without Porfimer Sodium-Based Photodynamic Therapy During Surgery in Treating Patients With Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without porfimer sodium-based photodynamic therapy during surgery works in treating patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pemetrexed disodium, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer, either by killing the cancer cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Photodynamic therapy uses a drug, such as porfimer sodium, that becomes active when it is exposed to a certain kind of light. When the drug is active, tumor cells are killed. It is not yet known whether chemotherapy is more effective with or without porfimer sodium-based photodynamic therapy during surgery in treating patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • A Study of Rebastinib (DCC-2036) in Combination With Carboplatin in Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This is an open-label Phase 1b / 2 multicenter study of rebastinib (DCC-2036) in combination with carboplatin designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics (PK) in patients with advanced or metastatic solid tumors.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Intraperitoneal MCY-M11 (Mesothelin-targeting CAR) for Treatment of Advanced Ovarian Cancer and Peritoneal Mesothelioma

    This is a phase 1 dose escalation study to characterize the feasibility, safety and tolerability of MCY-M11 when administered as an intraperitoneal (IP) infusion for 3 weekly doses for women with platinum resistant high grade serous adenocarcinoma of the ovary, primary peritoneum, or fallopian tube, and subjects with peritoneal mesothelioma with recurrence after prior chemotherapy.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • A Safety and Tolerability Study of INCAGN02385 in Select Advanced Malignancies

    The purpose of this study is to determine the safety, tolerability, and preliminary efficacy of INCAGN02385 in participants with advanced malignancies.
    Location: Vanderbilt University / Ingram Cancer Center, Nashville, Tennessee

  • Olaparib in People With Malignant Mesothelioma

    Background: The drug olaparib may stop cancer cells from fixing damage to their DNA. It has been approved to treat certain cancers in people that were born with a mutation in the BRCA gene. It has not been approved for treating mesothelioma. But some people with mesothelioma have mutations in a gene, BAP1 related to BRCA. Researchers want to see if olaparib can work in patients with mutations in this gene. They also want to see if works on mutations in other genes or patients without any mutations. They want to see if olaparib causes mesothelioma tumors to shrink. Objective: To study the effect of olaparib on mesothelioma. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older with malignant mesothelioma that has already been treated Design: Participants will be screened with Sample of tumor tissue or fluid Medical history Physical exam Blood, heart, and urine tests Scans and x-rays Participants will give blood and tissue samples. These will be genetically tested. The study will be done in 21-day cycles. Participants will take tables of the study drug 2 times each day. They will get information on what food and drugs to avoid during the study. They will get information about birth control. They will keep a diary of doses and symptoms. Participants will have blood and urine tests and scans every few weeks. Participants will be told any important genetic testing results. Participants will stay in the study until their disease gets worse or the participant or their doctor chooses to stop it. About 30 days after stopping the study drug, participants will have a follow-up visit. They will have a medical history, physical exam, blood tests, and scans. Some participants will continue to have scans every 6 weeks.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Donor Natural Killer Cells, Cyclophosphamide, and Etoposide in Treating Children and Young Adults with Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells (donor natural killer [NK] cells) and also how well they work when given together with cyclophosphamide and etoposide in treating children and young adults with solid tumors that have come back (relapsed) or that do not respond to treatment (refractory). NK cells, white blood cells important to the immune system, are donated / collected from cord blood collected at birth from healthy babies and grown in the lab. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving NK cells together with cyclophosphamide and etoposide may work better in treating children and young adults with solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients with CD30+ Malignant Mesothelioma That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase II trial studies how well brentuximab vedotin works in treating patients with CD30 positive (+) malignant mesothelioma that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as brentuximab vedotin, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pembrolizumab after Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best way to give pembrolizumab after radiation therapy in treating patients with pleural malignant mesothelioma. Radiation therapy uses high energy radiation to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving pembrolizumab after radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Continuous 24h Intravenous Infusion of Mithramycin, an Inhibitor of Cancer Stem Cell Signaling, in People With Primary Thoracic Malignancies or Carcinomas, Sarcomas or Germ Cell Neoplasms With Pleuropulmonary Metastases

    Background: Mithramycin is a new cancer drug. In another study, people with chest cancer took the drug 6 hours a day for 7 straight days. Many of them had liver damage as a side effect. It was discovered that only people with certain genes got this side effect. Researchers want to test mithramycin in people who do not have those certain genes. Objectives: To find the highest safe dose of mithramycin that can be given to people with chest cancer who have certain genes over 24 hours instead of spread out over a longer period of time. To see if mithramycin given as a 24-hour infusion shrinks tumors. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have chest cancer that is not shrinking with known therapies, and whose genes will limit the chance of liver damage from mithramycin Design: Participants will be screened with: Medical history Physical exam Blood and urine tests Lung and heart function tests X-rays or scans of their tumor Liver ultrasound Tumor biopsy Participants will be admitted to the hospital overnight. A small plastic tube (catheter) will be inserted in the arm or chest. They will get mithramycin through the catheter over about 24 hours. If they do not have bad side effects or their cancer does not worsen, they can repeat the treatment every 14 days. Participants will have multiple visits for each treatment cycle. These include repeats of certain screening tests. After stopping treatment, participants will have weekly visits until they recover from any side effects.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland


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