Treatment Clinical Trials for Thyroid Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for thyroid cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-40 of 40

  • Levothyroxine Sodium Liquid Gel Capsules or Tablets in Treating Patients with Stage I-II Differentiated Thyroid Cancer after Surgery

    This phase IV trial studies how well levothyroxine sodium liquid gel capsules work compared to tablets in treating patients with stage I-II differentiated thyroid cancer after surgery. Hormone replacement therapy, such as levothyroxine sodium, may help control thyroid cancer in patients after surgery. It is not yet known whether giving levothyroxine sodium tablets or liquid gel capsules may work better in treating patients with thyroid cancer after surgery.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Thermal Ablation and Spine Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Spine Metastases at Risk for Compressing the Spinal Cord

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well thermal ablation and spine stereotactic radiosurgery work in treating patients with cancer that has spread to the spine (spine metastases) and is at risk for compressing the spinal cord. Thermal ablation uses a laser to heat tumor tissue and helps to shrink the tumor by destroying tumor cells. Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers a large dose of radiation in a short time precisely to the tumor, sparing healthy surrounding tissue. Combining thermal ablation with stereotactic radiosurgery may be a better way to control cancer that has spread to the spine and is at risk for compressing the spinal cord.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Locally Advanced Thyroid Gland Undifferentiated (Anaplastic) Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab works in treating thyroid gland undifferentiated (anaplastic) cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • A Study to Test the Effect of the Drug Larotrectinib in Adults and Children With NTRK-fusion Positive Solid Tumors

    This research study is done to test how well different types of cancer respond to the drug called larotrectinib. The cancer must have a change in a particular gene (NTRK1, NTRK2 or NTRK3). Larotrectinib is a drug that blocks the actions of these NTRK genes in cancer cells and can therefore be used to treat cancer.
    Location: UCLA / Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Trametinib in Treating Patients with Solid Tumors, Metastatic Medullary Thyroid Cancer or Colorectal Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well trametinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, or colorectal cancer. Trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York

  • Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well trametinib works in increasing tumoral iodine incorporation in patients with thyroid cancer that has come back or spread to another place in the body. Trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and may help make treatment with iodine I-131 more effective.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Thyroid Gland Removal with or without Central Lymph Node Dissection in Treating Patients with Node Negative Thyroid Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well thyroid gland removal with or without central lymph node dissection works in treating patients with thyroid cancer or suspected thyroid cancer that has not spread to the lymph nodes. Currently, the standard treatment for thyroid cancer is total thyroidectomy, or complete removal of the thyroid. Sometimes, the lymph nodes in the central part of the neck may also be surgically removed, called central lymph node dissection. Prophylactic removal of the lymph nodes may increase the risk of life-threatening complications, and may reduce post-surgery quality of life. It may also reduce the chance of cancer returning and the need for additional surgery. It is not yet known whether recurrence rates and complication levels are lower after thyroid gland removal alone or with central lymph node dissection.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Cabozantinib-S-Malate as First-Line Therapy in Treating Patients With Radioiodine-Refractory Thyroid Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well cabozantinib-s-malate works as first-line therapy in treating patients with radioiodine-refractory thyroid cancer that has spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Cabozantinib may result in disease response and possibly allow for a prolonged period of response or stabilization of thyroid cancer by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Pennsylvania / Abramson Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Bevacizumab and Temsirolimus Alone or in Combination with Valproic Acid or Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Malignancy or Other Benign Disease

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of bevacizumab and temsirolimus alone or in combination with valproic acid or cetuximab in treating patients with a malignancy that has spread to other places in the body or other disease that is not cancerous. Immunotherapy with bevacizumab and cetuximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as valproic acid, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether bevacizumab and temsirolimus work better when given alone or with valproic acid or cetuximab in treating patients with a malignancy or other disease that is not cancerous.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pazopanib Hydrochloride and Abexinostat in Treating Patients with Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pazopanib hydrochloride and abexinostat in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other parts of the body. Pazopanib hydrochloride and abexinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • The Efficacy of CASAD in Patients With Diarrhea Related to Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    Diarrhea in patients with MTC (Medullary Thyroid Cancer) can be debilitating and, in some cases life threatening. Findings in such patients include volume depletion, renal insufficiency, and electrolyte disorders. Diarrhea can also lead to increased cost of care, reduced quality of life, and treatment delays. Not all patients benefit from conventional anti-diarrheal therapy. CASAD is proven to reduce diarrhea in humans and animals. Clays have water-binding effects, increase the absorptive capacity of the intestinal mucosa, and absorb the excess cytokines which are possible mechanisms of diarrhea in MTC. In this study, we will investigate if starting 1 g CASAD three times a day will ameliorate the severity of diarrhea in patients with MTC. Diarrhea in patients with MTC can be debilitating and, in some cases life threatening. Findings in such patients include volume depletion, renal insufficiency, and electrolyte disorders. We hypothesize that adding CASAD 3 grams / day will reduce the incidence and ameliorate the severity of diarrhea in patients with MTC.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Radioactive Drug (177Lu-DOTATATE) for the Treatment of Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Unresectable Rare Endocrine Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well 177Lu-DOTATATE works in treating patients with rare endocrine cancers that have spread from where they started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced), spread to other places in the body (metastatic), or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable). Radioactive drugs, such as 177Lu-DOTATATE, may carry radiation directly to cancer cells and not harm normal cells. 177Lu-DOTATATE may help to control endocrine cancers compared to standard treatment.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Dabrafenib, Trametinib, and IMRT in Treating Patients with BRAF Mutated Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    This trial studies how well dabrafenib, trametinib, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) work together in treating patients with BRAF mutated anaplastic thyroid cancer. Dabrafenib and trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving dabrafenib, trametinib, and IMRT together may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    This randomized phase II trials studies how well nivolumab and ipilimumab work treating patients with thyroid cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Regorafenib in Treating Patients with Metastatic Medullary and Differentiated Radioiodine Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well regorafenib works in treating patients with medullary thyroid cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic), and differentiated radioiodine thyroid cancer that does not respond to treatment (refractory). Regorafenib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov