Treatment Clinical Trials for Thyroid Cancer

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for thyroid cancer treatment. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 26-45 of 45

  • Stereotactic MRI-Guided Focused Ultrasound Mesencephalotomy for Pain Palliation in Head & Neck Cancer

    This study evaluates the safety and effects of the ExAblate Neuro when used for reducing pain related to head and neck cancer. This technology is one method of performing an ablation (surgical removal of tissue) without cutting or penetrating through the skin or skull bone. The ExAblate Neuro system uses ultrasound energy to kill a small group of cells deep in the brain that may stop pain feelings related to the cancer. This technique is less invasive because it does not cut or drill through the skull. The ExAblate uses focused ultrasound to heat a small spot in the brain much like a magnifying glass uses light to heat a small spot. Ultrasound passes through the skin and skull into the brain to the target spot and heats enough to burn and destroy it.
    Location: University of Virginia Cancer Center, Charlottesville, Virginia

  • A Study to Evaluate Safety, Tolerability and Preliminary Efficacy of FP-1305 in Cancer Patients

    This is a first in human study to identify whether FP-1305 is suitable to use in humans. The previous pre-clinical studies have demonstrated that FP-1305 binds to a receptor known as CLEVER-1. CLEVER-1 has been shown to support tumour growth. No significant adverse events were witnessed in primates and the dose used will be 300 fold lower than the dose provided to primates which showed no toxicity. The patients with advanced melanoma, uveal melanoma, cholangiocarcinoma, gallbladder cancer, ER+ breast, gastric, ovarian, pancreatic, colorectal, liver or anaplastic thyroid cancer who have exhausted all licenced therapeutic options will die due to their disease. Based on the investigator's existing data CLEVER-1 is expressed in these tumour types. Inhibition of CLEVER-1 with FP-1305 may have an anti-tumour effect in these patients.
    Location: Cancer Therapy and Research Center at The UT Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas

  • LN-145 or LN-145-S1 in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Ovarian Cancer, Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer, Osteosarcoma, or Other Bone and Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    This phase II trial studies how well autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes LN-145 (LN-145) or LN-145-S1 works in treating patients with ovarian cancer, anaplastic thyroid cancer, osteosarcoma, or other bone and soft tissue sarcomas that do not respond to treatment (refractory) or that has come back (relapsed). LN-145 is made by collecting and growing specialized white blood cells (called T-cells) that are collected from the patient's tumor. LN-145-S1 is made using a modified process that chooses a specific portion of the T-cells. The T cells may specifically recognize, target, and kill the tumor cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pembrolizumab and Docetaxel in Treating Participants with Poorly Chemo-Responsive and Unresectable Thyroid and Salivary Gland Cancers

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and docetaxel work in treating participants with poorly chemo-responsive thyroid and salivary gland cancers that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving pembrolizumab and docetaxel may work better in treating participants with thyroid and salivary gland cancers.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Trametinib and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients with Metastatic Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This pilot early phase I trial studies how well trametinib and paclitaxel work in treating patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer that has spread from the primary site to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery. Trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trametinib and paclitaxel may work better in treating patients with anaplastic thyroid cancer.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Thermal Ablation and Spine Stereotactic Radiosurgery in Treating Patients with Spine Metastases at Risk for Compressing the Spinal Cord

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well thermal ablation and spine stereotactic radiosurgery work in treating patients with cancer that has spread to the spine (spine metastases) and is at risk for compressing the spinal cord. Thermal ablation uses a laser to heat tumor tissue and helps to shrink the tumor by destroying tumor cells. Stereotactic radiosurgery delivers a large dose of radiation in a short time precisely to the tumor, sparing healthy surrounding tissue. Combining thermal ablation with stereotactic radiosurgery may be a better way to control cancer that has spread to the spine and is at risk for compressing the spinal cord.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Trametinib in Increasing Tumoral Iodine Incorporation in Patients with Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well trametinib works in increasing tumoral iodine incorporation in patients with thyroid cancer that has come back or spread to another place in the body. Trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth and may help make treatment with iodine I-131 more effective.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Bevacizumab and Temsirolimus Alone or in Combination with Valproic Acid or Cetuximab in Treating Patients with Advanced or Metastatic Malignancy or Other Benign Disease

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of bevacizumab and temsirolimus alone or in combination with valproic acid or cetuximab in treating patients with a malignancy that has spread to other places in the body or other disease that is not cancerous. Immunotherapy with bevacizumab and cetuximab, may induce changes in body’s immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Temsirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as valproic acid, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether bevacizumab and temsirolimus work better when given alone or with valproic acid or cetuximab in treating patients with a malignancy or other disease that is not cancerous.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Pazopanib and Abexinostat in Treating Patients with Metastatic Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of pazopanib and abexinostat in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other parts of the body. Pazopanib and abexinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Laser Ablation for the Treatment of Papillary Thyroid Microcarcinoma

    This phase II trial studies the effect of percutaneous laser ablation (PLA) in treating patients with papillary thyroid microcarcinoma (PTMC). PLA destroys cancer cells with a laser beam that produces extremely high temperatures in a precisely targeted area. The PLA in this study uses a device called EchoLaser Evo System. Previous studies in patients with PTMC have shown that PLA can shrink this type of cancer. However, it is not known whether this procedure may work in everyone with this cancer or if it can completely destroy tumor tissue.
    Location: Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • A First-in-Human Study of CDK-002 (exoSTING) in Subjects With Advanced / Metastatic, Recurrent, Injectable Solid Tumors

    This is a first-in-human, Phase 1 / 2 open-label, multicenter, dose escalation, safety, pharmacodynamic, and PK study of CDK-002 in subjects with advanced / metastatic, recurrent, injectable solid tumors, whose disease has progressed despite receiving standard of care treatment. CDK 002 will be administered intratumorally (IT). Part A will enroll subjects with advanced / metastatic, recurrent, injectable solid tumors with emphasis on head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC), triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), anaplastic thyroid carcinoma (ATC) and cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC).
    Location: NYP / Columbia University Medical Center / Herbert Irving Comprehensive Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Lenvatinib before Surgery for the Treatment of Locally Advanced or Recurrent Invasive Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the effect of lenvatinib given before surgery in treating patients with invasive thyroid cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or has come back (recurrent). Lenvatinib is a type of inhibitor that works by inhibiting (stopping) a protein called tyrosine kinase. These proteins are responsible for the growth and development of cells. In invasive thyroid cancer, these proteins are overproduced causing cancer cells to continue to grow. Giving lenvatinib before surgery, may cause thyroid cancer to stop growing, and allow doctors to remove as much of the cancerous tumor as possible during surgery.
    Location: Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, Massachusetts

  • Dabrafenib, Trametinib, and IMRT in Treating Patients with BRAF Mutated Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer

    This trial studies how well dabrafenib, trametinib, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) work together in treating patients with BRAF mutated anaplastic thyroid cancer. Dabrafenib and trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Radiation therapy uses high energy beams to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving dabrafenib, trametinib, and IMRT together may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Lenvatinib and Iodine I-131 in Treating Patients with Radioactive Iodine-Sensitive Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well lenvatinib works when given together with standard of care iodine I-131 in treating patients with radioactive iodine-sensitive differentiated thyroid cancer. Lenvatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Emory University Hospital / Winship Cancer Institute, Atlanta, Georgia

  • Donor Natural Killer Cells, Cyclophosphamide, and Etoposide in Treating Children and Young Adults with Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of cord blood-derived expanded allogeneic natural killer cells (donor natural killer [NK] cells) and how well they work when given together with cyclophosphamide and etoposide in treating children and young adults with solid tumors that have come back (relapsed) or that do not respond to treatment (refractory). NK cells, white blood cells important to the immune system, are donated / collected from cord blood collected at birth from healthy babies and grown in the lab. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving NK cells together with cyclophosphamide and etoposide may work better in treating children and young adults with solid tumors.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Atezolizumab with Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Anaplastic or Poorly Differentiated Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well atezolizumab in combination with chemotherapy works in treating patients with anaplastic or poorly differentiated thyroid cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Vemurafenib and cobimetinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs such as nab-paclitaxel and paclitaxel work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. This trial is being done to see if atezolizumab in combination with chemotherapy works better in treating patients with anaplastic or poorly differentiated thyroid cancer compared to standard treatments.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cyclophosphamide and Sirolimus and in Treating Patients with Metastatic, Radioiodine-Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well cyclophosphamide and sirolimus work in treating patients with thyroid cancer that has spread to other places in the body and does not respond to treatment with radioiodine. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Sirolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving cyclophosphamide and sirolimus may work better in treating patients with thyroid cancer.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • The Efficacy of CASAD in Patients With Diarrhea Related to Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    Diarrhea in patients with MTC (Medullary Thyroid Cancer) can be debilitating and, in some cases life threatening. Findings in such patients include volume depletion, renal insufficiency, and electrolyte disorders. Diarrhea can also lead to increased cost of care, reduced quality of life, and treatment delays. Not all patients benefit from conventional anti-diarrheal therapy. CASAD is proven to reduce diarrhea in humans and animals. Clays have water-binding effects, increase the absorptive capacity of the intestinal mucosa, and absorb the excess cytokines which are possible mechanisms of diarrhea in MTC. In this study, we will investigate if starting 1 g CASAD three times a day will ameliorate the severity of diarrhea in patients with MTC. Diarrhea in patients with MTC can be debilitating and, in some cases life threatening. Findings in such patients include volume depletion, renal insufficiency, and electrolyte disorders. We hypothesize that adding CASAD 3 grams / day will reduce the incidence and ameliorate the severity of diarrhea in patients with MTC.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Testing the Combination of the Anti-cancer Drugs XL184 (Cabozantinib) and Nivolumab in Patients with Advanced Cancer and HIV

    This phase I trial investigates the side effects of cabozantinib and nivolumab in treating patients with cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced) and who are undergoing treatment for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib and nivolumab may shrink or stabilize cancer in patients undergoing treatment for HIV.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Refractory Thyroid Cancer

    This randomized phase II trials studies how well nivolumab and ipilimumab work treating patients with thyroid cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts