Uterine Sarcoma Clinical Trials

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are for uterine sarcoma. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-7 of 7
  • Short Course Vaginal Cuff Brachytherapy in Treating Patients with Stage I-II Endometrial Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies short course vaginal cuff brachytherapy to see how well it works compared with standard of care vaginal cuff brachytherapy in treating patients with stage I-II endometrial cancer. Short course vaginal cuff brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, uses (over a shorter period) radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor in the upper portion of the vagina to kill tumor cells.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Nivolumab in Treating Patients with Metastatic or Recurrent Uterine Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well nivolumab works in treating patients with uterine cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or come back after a period of improvement (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body’s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Rapid Analysis and Response Evaluation of Combination Anti-Neoplastic Agents in Rare Tumors (RARE CANCER) Trial: RARE 1 Nilotinib and Paclitaxel

    Background: People with rare cancers often have limited treatment options. The biology of rare cancers is not well understood. Researchers want to find better treatments for these cancers. They want to test 2 drugs that, taken separately, have helped people with non-rare cancers. They want to see if these drugs together can make rare cancers shrink or stop growing. Objective: To learn if nilotinib and paclitaxel will benefit people with rare cancers. Eligibility: People age 18 and older who have a rare, advanced cancer that has progressed after receiving standard treatment, or for which no effective therapy exists. Design: Participants will be screened with medical history and physical exam. They will have blood and urine tests. They will have a pregnancy test if needed. They will have an electrocardiogram to check their heart. They will have imaging scans to measure their tumors. Participants will repeat the screening tests during the study. Participants will receive nilotinib and paclitaxel. The drugs are given in 28-day cycles. Nilotinib is a capsule taken by mouth twice a day. Paclitaxel will be given intravenously by peripheral line or central line once a week for the first 3 weeks of each cycle. Participants will keep a medicine diary. They will track when they take the study drugs and any side effects they may have. Participants may have optional tumor biopsies. Participants can stay on the study until their disease gets worse or they have intolerable side effects. Participants will have a follow-up phone call about 30 days after taking the last dose of study drugs.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland

  • Cabozantinib and Temozolomide for the Treatment of Unresectable or Metastatic Leiomyosarcoma or Other Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib and temozolomide work in treating patients with leiomyosarcoma or other soft tissue sarcoma that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) or has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving cabozantinib and temozolomide may work better than either one alone in treating patients with leiomyosarcoma or other soft tissue sarcoma. Cabozantinib is an investigational drug, which means that it has not been approved by the United States (US) Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or any other regulatory agencies for sale or use by the public for the indication under investigation in this study.
    Location: 7 locations

  • Doxorubicin, AGEN1884, and AGEN2034 for the Treatment of Advanced or Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    This phase II trial studies how well doxorubicin together with AGEN1884 and AGEN2034 work in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma that has spread to other places in the body (advanced or metastatic). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as AGEN1884 and AGEN2034, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving doxorubicin, AGEN1884, and AGEN2034 may work better in treating patients with soft tissue sarcoma compared to doxorubicin alone.
    Location: University of Colorado, Denver, Colorado

  • An EHR-Based Comprehensive Bone and Soft Tissue Tumor Registry

    This study collects clinical data and blood samples from patients with bone or soft tissue tumor to create an electronic health record (EHR)-based clinical registry. Creating an EHR-based clinical registry, may improve clinical and research studies which may contribute to improved disease control rates and cures in bone and soft tissue tumors.
    Location: Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center, Columbus, Ohio

  • Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL): Clinical Manifestations, Diagnosis, Management and Molecular Bases of Inherited Renal and Other Urologic Malignant Disorders

    We will investigate the clinical manifestations and molecular genetic defects of heritable urologic malignant disorders. Families with urologic malignancy with known or suspected genetic basis will be enrolled. Affected individuals or individuals suspected of having a germline urologic malignant disorder will undergo periodic clinical assessment and genetic analyses for the purpose of: 1) definition and characterization of phenotype, 2) determination of the natural history of the disorder, and 3) genotype / phenotype correlation. Genetic linkage studies may be performed in situations in which the genetic basis of the disorder has not been elucidated.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland