Clinical Trials Using Arsenic Trioxide

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Arsenic Trioxide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-5 of 5
  • Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients with Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    This phase III trial studies tretinoin and arsenic trioxide in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute promyelocytic leukemia. Standard treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia involves high doses of a common class of chemotherapy drugs called anthracyclines, which are known to cause long-term side effects, especially to the heart. Tretinoin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Arsenic trioxide may stop the growth of cancer cells by either killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Completely removing or reducing the amount of anthracycline chemotherapy and giving tretinoin together with arsenic trioxide may be an effective treatment for acute promyelocytic leukemia and may reduce some of the long-term side effects.
    Location: 141 locations

  • A Phase I, Three-part Study to Determine the Maximum Tolerated Dose / Recommended Dose, Compare Bioavailability in the Fed and Fasted States, and Evaluate Safety and Tolerability of ORH-2014 in Subjects With Advanced Hematological Disorders

    Part 1 will be conducted as an open-label, non-randomized, non-placebo-controlled dose escalation study using pre-specified doses. Subjects with the following advanced hematological disorders and no available therapies, and who satisfy all inclusion / exclusion criteria will be enrolled. Part 2 will consist of an initial randomized, open-label, 3-sequence, 3-period, crossover study to evaluate the bioavailability of a single dose of oral ORH-2014 administered in the fed or fasted state (at the MTD or recommended dose identified in Part 1) compared to a single dose of IV Trisenox administered at a dose of 0.15 mg / kg. Part 3 will be an expansion phase conducted as a single-arm, open-label study to further evaluate the safety and tolerability of ORH-2014 at the MTD or recommended dose. Subjects with the same disease types as in Part 1 will be enrolled. All subjects will receive oral ORH-2014 at the MTD or recommended dose for an initial period of up to 12 weeks.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Tretinoin and Arsenic Trioxide with or without Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well tretinoin and arsenic trioxide with or without gemtuzumab ozogamicin works in treating patients with previously untreated acute promyelocytic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as tretinoin and arsenic trioxide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotoxins, such as gemtuzumab ozogamicin, may find certain cancer cells and kill them without harming normal cells. Giving tretinoin and arsenic trioxide together with gemtuzumab ozogamicin may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Arsenic Trioxide and Itraconazole in Treating Patients with Advanced Basal Cell Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well arsenic trioxide and itraconazole work in treating patients with basal cell cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as arsenic trioxide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Itraconazole may help treat fungal infections in patients with basal cell cancer. Giving arsenic trioxide with itraconazole may work better in treating basal cell cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well arsenic trioxide works in treating patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as arsenic trioxide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California