Clinical Trials Using Cladribine

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cladribine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-12 of 12
  • Cladribine with Simultaneous or Delayed Rituximab in Treating Patients with Hairy Cell Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies cladribine with simultaneous or delayed rituximab to see how well they work in treating patients with hairy cell leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether cladribine is more effective with simultaneous or delayed rituximab in treating patients with hairy cell leukemia.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Higher or Lower Dose Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Medically Less Fit Patients with Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myeloid Neoplasm

    This randomized pilot phase II trial studies how well higher or lower dose cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone work in treating medically less fit patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myeloid neoplasm. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone at higher or lower dose may work better in treating patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Decitabine, Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This randomized phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of decitabine when given together with filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that is newly diagnosed, has come back, or has not responded to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as decitabine, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim, may increase the production of blood cells and may help the immune system recover from the side effects of chemotherapy. Decitabine, filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia and myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Early Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory High-Grade Myeloid Neoplasms

    This clinical trial studies how well early stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with high-grade myeloid neoplasms that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. The donated stem cells may also replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Early stem cell transplantation may result in more successful treatment for patients with high-grade myeloid neoplasms.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone with Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients with Newly-Diagnosed, Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of filgrastim (granulocyte colony-stimulating factor [G-CSF]), cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, when given together with sorafenib tosylate and to see how well they work in treating patients with newly-diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome (likely to be more aggressive). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Sorafenib tosylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride together with sorafenib tosylate may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim in Combination with Selinexor in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best way to give selinexor together with cladribine, cytarabine, and filgrastim, and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or has not responded to previous treatment (refractory). Selinexor may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the proteins needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, cytarabine, and filgrastim, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug, combination chemotherapy, may kill more cancer cells. Giving selinexor together with cladribine, cytarabine, and filgrastim may be a better treatment for acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • Sequential Busulfan, Cladribine, and Fludarabine Phosphate before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Acute Myelogenous Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well sequential busulfan, cladribine, and fludarabine phosphate before donor stem cell transplant work in treating patients with acute myelogenous leukemia or myelodysplastic syndromes. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cladribine, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia, High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well cladribine, idarubicin, and cytarabine work in patients with acute myeloid leukemia, high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome, or blastic phase chronic myeloid leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, idarubicin, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Guadecitabine with or without Idarubicin or Cladribine in Treating Older Patients with Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well guadecitabine with or without idarubicin or cladribine works in treating older patients with previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia. Guadecitabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as idarubicin and cladribine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether guadecitabine with or without idarubicin or cladribine is more effective in treating older patients with previously untreated acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed / Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of mitoxantrone hydrochloride when given together with filgrastim, cladribine, and cytarabine and to see how well they work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes that is newly diagnosed, has returned, or does not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as filgrastim, cladribine, cytarabine, and mitoxantrone hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Patients with Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    This phase II trial studies how well cladribine, cytarabine, and decitabine work in treating patients with untreated acute myeloid leukemia or high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, cytarabine, and decitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Cladribine and Rituximab in Treating Patients with Hairy Cell Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well cladribine and rituximab work in treating patients with hairy cell leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cladribine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, can find cancer cells and help kill them. Giving cladribine together with rituximab may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas