Clinical Trials Using Goserelin Acetate

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Goserelin Acetate. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-14 of 14
  • Hormone Therapy with or without Everolimus in Treating Patients with Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well hormone therapy when given together with or without everolimus work in treating patients with breast cancer. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Hormone therapy using tamoxifen citrate, goserelin acetate, leuprolide acetate, anastrozole, letrozole, or exemestane, may fight breast cancer by lowering the amount of estrogen the body makes. Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether hormone therapy is more effective when given with or without everolimus in treating breast cancer.
    Location: 1374 locations

  • Exemestane with or without Entinostat in Treating Patients with Recurrent Hormone Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer That is Locally Advanced or Metastatic

    This randomized phase III trial studies exemestane and entinostat to see how well they work compared to exemestane alone in treating patients with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes or another place in the body. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Endocrine therapy using exemestane may fight breast cancer by lowering the amount of estrogen the body makes. Entinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether exemestane is more effective with or without entinostat in treating breast cancer.
    Location: 632 locations

  • Antiandrogen Therapy and Radiation Therapy with or without Docetaxel in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer That Has Been Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies docetaxel, antiandrogen therapy, and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy alone in treating patients with prostate cancer that has been removed by surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cells. Antihormone therapy may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy with or without docetaxel after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells.
    Location: 180 locations

  • Study to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of Ribociclib (LEE011) in Combination With Letrozole for the Treatment of Men and Pre / Postmenopausal Women With HR+ HER2- aBC

    The purpose of this Phase IIIb study is to collect additional safety and efficacy data for the combination of ribociclib + letrozole in men and pre / postmenopausal women with HR+HER2- advanced breast cancer.
    Location: 8 locations

  • PD 0332991 and Anastrozole for Stage 2 or 3 Estrogen Receptor Positive and HER2 Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies palbociclib isethionate together with anastrozole and to see how well they work in treating patients with estrogen receptor positive (ER+) and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 negative (HER2-) stage II or III breast cancer. Palbociclib isethionate may stop tumor growth by blocking an enzyme needed for cell division and growth. Estrogen can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Hormone therapy using anastrozole may fight breast cancer by lowering the amount of estrogen the body makes. Giving palbociclib isethionate together with anastrozole may be an effective treatment for ER+ HER2- breast cancer.
    Location: 5 locations

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Hormone Therapy in Treating Patients with Localized Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as stereotactic radiosurgery, and hormone therapy and how well they work in treating patients with localized intermediate-risk prostate cancer. SBRT is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Antihormone therapy, such as goserelin acetate, leuprolide acetate, and bicalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. Giving SBRT and hormone therapy may be an effective treatment for prostate cancer.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Alternative Dosing Schedule of Palbociclib and Letrozole or Fulvestrant with or without Goserelin Acetate in Treating Patients with Metastatic Hormone Receptor Positive Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of an alternative dosing schedule of palbociclib and letrozole or fulvestrant with or without goserelin acetate in treating patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Estrogen and progesterone can cause the growth of breast tumor cells. Hormone therapy using letrozole, fulvestrant, and goserelin acetate may fight hormone receptor positive breast cancer by blocking the use of estrogen and progesterone by the tumor cells. Giving an alternative dosing schedule of palbociclib and letrozole or fulvestrant with or without goserelin acetate may work better in treating patients with hormone receptor positive breast cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Paclitaxel and Carboplatin before Surgery in Treating Nigerian Women with Stage IIA-IIIC Breast Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well paclitaxel works with carboplatin before surgery in treating Nigerian women with stage IIA-IIIC breast cancer before surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: University of Chicago Comprehensive Cancer Center, Chicago, Illinois

  • Apalutamide with or without Abiraterone Acetate, Gonadotropin-Releasing Hormone Analog, and Prednisone in Treating Patients with High-Risk Prostate Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well apalutamide works with or without abiraterone acetate, gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist, and prednisone in treating patients with high-risk prostate cancer undergoing surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Hormone therapy using apalutamide, abiraterone acetate, and gonadotropin-releasing hormone analog (GnRH agonist) may fight prostate cancer by lowering the levels of androgen the body makes. Prednisone may either kill the tumor cells or stop them from dividing. Giving apalutamide with or without abiraterone acetate, GnRH agonist and prednisone may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • High-Dose Brachytherapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well high-dose brachytherapy works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body. Brachytherapy is a type of radiation therapy in which radioactive material sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters is placed directly into or near a tumor and may be a better treatment in patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Testosterone Therapy Followed by Enzalutamide or Abiraterone Acetate in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer That Is Progressing on Combined Androgen Therapies

    This phase II trial studies how well testosterone therapy followed by enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has become worse or spread on combined androgen therapies. Androgens, such as testosterone, can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Androgen therapies, such as enzalutamide and abiraterone acetate, suppress or block the production or action of testosterone. Rapid treatment with testosterone may make the cancer cells become sensitive to retreatment with enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate. Giving testosterone prior to enzalutamide or abiraterone acetate may have an effect on the growth of prostate cancer in men who have not responded to long term therapy to lower testosterone in their blood (castrating therapy).
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy with Stereotactic Radiosurgery Boost and Hormone Therapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This clinical trial studies intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with stereotactic radiosurgery boost and hormone therapy in treating patients with prostate cancer. Specialized radiation therapy, such as IMRT and stereotactic radiosurgery, that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Androgen hormones can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells and antihormone therapy drugs, such as leuprolide acetate, goserelin acetate, and bicalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. Giving IMRT with stereotactic radiosurgery boost and androgen deprivation therapy may be an effective treatment for prostate cancer.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Enzalutamide versus Standard Androgen Deprivation Therapy in Reducing Incidence of Metabolic Syndrome in Patients with Advanced Prostate Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial compares enzalutamide with standard androgen deprivation therapy in reducing incidence of metabolic syndrome in patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Metabolic syndrome is defined as changes in cholesterol, blood pressure, circulating sugar levels, and body weight. Previous studies have shown that patients with prostate cancer, who have been treated with standard medical therapy that lowers testosterone levels, have an increased risk of these changes. Hormone therapy using enzalutamide may fight prostate cancer by blocking the use of testosterone by the tumor cells instead of lowering testosterone levels. It is not yet known whether prostate cancer patients who receive enzalutamide will have reduced incidence of metabolic syndrome than patients who receive standard androgen deprivation therapy.
    Location: 2 locations

  • mpMRI in Detecting and Goserelin Acetate and Enzalutamide in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Prostate Cancer

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well multi parametric magnetic resonance imaging (mpMRI), goserelin acetate, and enzalutamide work in detecting and treating patients with newly diagnosed prostate cancer. Diagnostic procedures, such as mpMRI, may have high functionality for the detection of focal prostate cancer. Hormone therapy using goserelin acetate may fight prostate cancer by lowering the amount of androgen the body makes and blocking the use of androgen by the tumor cells. Anti-hormone therapy, such as enzalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Giving enzalutamide and goserelin acetate before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. Linking this to predictive information from imaging may provide critical insight into the biology of prostate cancer and help develop predictive markers for potentially curative therapy.
    Location: National Institutes of Health Clinical Center, Bethesda, Maryland