Clinical Trials Using Imiquimod

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Imiquimod. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-8 of 8
  • Topical or Ablative Treatment in Preventing Anal Cancer in Patients with HIV and Anal High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    This randomized phase III trial compares topical or ablative treatment with active monitoring in preventing anal cancer in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Anal HSIL is tissue in the anal canal that has been damaged by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and is at risk for turning into anal cancer. It is not yet known if treating HSIL is more effective than active monitoring in preventing patients from developing anal cancer.
    Location: 25 locations

  • Imiquimod, Fluorouracil, or Observation in Treating Patients With High-Grade Anal Squamous Skin Lesions Who Are HIV-Positive

    This randomized phase III trial studies imiquimod or fluorouracil to see how well they work compared to observation in treating patients with high-grade anal squamous skin lesions who are human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive. Biological therapies, such as imiquimod, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop tumor cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether imiquimod or fluorouracil is more effective than observation in treating high-grade anal squamous skin lesions.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Personalized Peptide Vaccine in Treating Patients with Advanced Pancreatic Cancer or Colorectal Cancer

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best way to give personalized peptide vaccine in patients with pancreatic or colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment (advanced). Personalized peptide vaccine is a vaccine developed from patient's own tumor cells and blood in order to use as a biological therapy. Biological therapies, such as personalized peptide vaccine may attack tumor cells and stop them from growing or kill them.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • HLA-A2 Restricted Peptide Vaccine and Imiquimod in Treating Children with Recurrent Ependymoma

    This pilot trial studies the side effects and to see how well human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2 restricted peptide vaccine and imiquimod work in treating children with ependymoma that has come back after a period of improvement. Vaccines made from HLA-A2 restricted tumor antigen peptides and imiquimod may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells.
    Location: Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh of UPMC, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Vaccine Therapy and Imiquimod in Treating Patients With High Risk or Recurrent Grade II Gliomas

    This pilot clinical trial studies vaccine therapy and imiquimod in treating patients with high risk or recurrent grade II gliomas. Vaccines may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells.
    Location: University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (UPCI), Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

  • Therapeutic Vaccination for Patients With HPV16+ Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN2 / 3)

    This study will test the efficacy and safety of different routes of administration of a DNA vaccine in patients with HPV16+ CIN2 / 3. Subjects will be enrolled in one of six treatment groups. Subjects enrolled in the first two groups will receive vaccination intradermally with a needle-free delivery device. Subjects enrolled in groups 3 and 4 will receive vaccination intramuscularly. Subjects enrolled in groups 5 and 6 will receive vaccine intralesionally.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Vaccine Therapy and Sargramostim With or Without Imiquimod in Treating Patients With Advanced Ovarian, Primary Peritoneal, or Fallopian Tube Cancer

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well vaccine therapy and sargramostim with or without imiquimod work in treating patients with advanced ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer. Vaccines made from dendritic cells mixed with tumor cells may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Sargramostim increases white blood cells and may stimulate them to kill tumor cells. Imiquimod stimulates the immune system and may stop tumor cells from growing. It is not yet known whether vaccine therapy and sargramostim are more effective with or without imiquimod in treating patients with ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube cancer.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Vaccine Therapy with or without Imiquimod in Treating Patients with High-Grade Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of giving vaccine therapy with or without imiquimod in treating patients with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Vaccines made from deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or a gene-modified virus may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Biological therapies, such as imiquimod, may stimulate the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Giving vaccine therapy together with imiquimod may be a better treatment for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland