Clinical Trials Using Romidepsin

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Romidepsin. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-14 of 14
  • PI3K Delta / Gamma Inhibitor IPI-145 and Romidepsin or Bortezomib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory T-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of PI3K delta / gamma inhibitor IPI-145 when given together with romidepsin or bortezomib in treating patients with T-cell lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. PI3K delta / gamma inhibitor IPI-145, romidepsin, and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Chemotherapy, Stem Cell Transplant, and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, stem cell transplant, and romidepsin work in treating patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. The patient’s stem cells that were previously collected are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin following stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Romidepsin in Treating Patients with Lymphoma, Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Solid Tumors with Liver Dysfunction

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin in treating patients with lymphoma, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, or solid tumors with liver dysfunction. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by entering the cancer cells and by blocking the activity of proteins that are important for the cancer’s growth and survival.
    Location: 13 locations

  • Romidepsin and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients with Previously Untreated Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate how safe and effective the combination of the study drugs romidepsin and lenalidomide is for treating patients with peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) who have not been previously treated for this cancer. Currently, there is no standard treatment for patients with PTCL; the most common treatment used is a combination of drugs called CHOP, but this can be a difficult treatment to tolerate because of side effects, and is not particularly effective for most patients with PTCL. Romidepsin (Istodax) is a type of drug called an HDAC inhibitor. It interacts with DNA (genetic material in cells) in ways that can stop tumors from growing. It is given as an infusion through the veins. Lenalidomide (Revlimid) is a type of drug known as an immunomodulatory drug, or IMID for short. This drug affects how tumor cells grow and survive, including affecting blood vessel growth in tumors. It is given as an oral tablet (by mouth).
    Location: 4 locations

  • Romidepsin, Gemcitabine Hydrochloride, Oxaliplatin, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Aggressive Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin when given together with gemcitabine hydrochloride, oxaliplatin, and dexamethasone in treating patients with lymphoma that has returned after previous treatment (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) and is growing and spreading quickly (aggressive). Romidepsin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as gemcitabine hydrochloride, oxaliplatin, and dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin with gemcitabine hydrochloride, oxaliplatin, and dexamethasone may be a better treatment for lymphoma.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Volasertib and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Peripheral T Cell Lymphoma or Stage IIB-IV Cutaneous T Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of volasertib and romidepsin given together in treating patients with peripheral T cell lymphoma or stage IIB-IV cutaneous T cell lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Volasertib and romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Romidepsin and Brentuximab Vedotin in Treating Patients with Cutaneous T-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and side effects of romidepsin when given together with brentixumab vedotin in treating patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as brentuximab vedotin, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving romidepsin and brentuximab vedotin together may work better in treating patients with cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • Azacitidine and / or Romidepsin with Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients with Microsatellite Stable Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    This randomized pilot clinical trial studies azacitidine and / or romidepsin with pembrolizumab in treating patients with microsatellite stable colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Microsatellite are short and repeated sequences of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) found in tumor cells. Tumor cells with microsatellite stability may be able to repair mistakes made in the DNA. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Romidepsin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving azacitidine and / or romidepsin together with pembrolizumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Cisplatin and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with Locally Recurrent or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin when given together with cisplatin and to see how well they work in treating patients with triple negative breast cancer that has come back at or near the same place as the original (primary) tumor, usually after a period of time during which the cancer could not be detected or spread to other parts of the body. Romidepsin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Romidepsin may also help cisplatin work better. Giving romidepsin together with cisplatin may be a better treatment for tripe negative breast cancer.
    Location: University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas City, Kansas

  • Azacitidine and Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoid Malignancies

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of azacitidine when given together with romidepsin and to see how well they work in treating patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoid malignancies. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as azacitidine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving azacitidine together with romidepsin may be an effective treatment for lymphoid malignancies.
    Location: Columbia University / Herbert Irving Cancer Center, New York, New York

  • Pralatrexate and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / IIa trial studies the side effects and the best dose of pralatrexate and romidepsin and to see how well they work in treating patients with lymphoma or multiple myeloma that has come back after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Pralatrexate may slow, stop, or decrease the growth of cancer cells by blocking how cells are made. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving pralatrexate together with romidepsin may work better in treating patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, Hodgkin's lymphoma, or multiple myeloma
    Location: 3 locations

  • Romidepsin and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Stage IB-IVB Relapsed or Refractory T-cell Lymphomas

    This phase I clinical trial studies the side effects and best dose of romidepsin when given with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride in treating patients with stage IB-IVB T-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride may be a better treatment for T-cell lymphoma.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California

  • Carfilzomib with or without Romidepsin in Treating Patients with Stage IA-IVB Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    This randomized phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of carfilzomib when given together with or without romidepsin in treating patients with stage IA-IVB cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Carfilzomib and romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether giving carfilzomib alone is more effective than when given together with romidepsin.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Lenalidomide and Romidepsin with or without Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Recurrent or Refractory Hodgkin Lymphoma, Mature T-cell Lymphoma, or Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I / IIa trial studies the safety and best dose of lenalidomide and romidepsin with or without dexamethasone and to see how well they work in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma, mature T-cell lymphoma, or multiple myeloma that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide and dexamethasone, may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Romidepsin may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving lenalidomide and romidepsin with or without dexamethasone may work better in treating Hodgkin lymphoma, mature T-cell lymphoma, or multiple myeloma.
    Location: Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut