Clinical Trials Using Bicalutamide

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Bicalutamide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-11 of 11
  • Antiandrogen Therapy and Radiation Therapy with or without Docetaxel in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer That Has Been Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies docetaxel, antiandrogen therapy, and radiation therapy to see how well it works compared with antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy alone in treating patients with prostate cancer that has been removed by surgery. Androgen can cause the growth of prostate cells. Antihormone therapy may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving antiandrogen therapy and radiation therapy with or without docetaxel after surgery may kill any remaining tumor cells.
    Location: 182 locations

  • Palbociclib and Bicalutamide in Treating Patients with Androgen Receptor Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best doses of palbociclib when given together with bicalutamide and to see how well they work in treating patients with androgen receptor positive breast cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Palbociclib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Androgens can cause the growth of breast cancer cells. Antihormone therapy, such as bicalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. Giving palbociclib and bicalutamide together may work better in treating androgen receptor positive breast cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • An Efficacy and Safety Study of JNJ-56021927 (Apalutamide) in High-risk Prostate Cancer Subjects Receiving Primary Radiation Therapy: ATLAS

    The purpose of this study is to determine if apalutamide plus gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) agonist in participants with high-risk, localized or locally advanced prostate cancer receiving primary radiation therapy results in an improvement of metastasis-free survival.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Hormone Therapy in Treating Patients with Localized Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT), also known as stereotactic radiosurgery, and hormone therapy and how well they work in treating patients with localized intermediate-risk prostate cancer. SBRT is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Androgens can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells. Antihormone therapy, such as goserelin acetate, leuprolide acetate, and bicalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. Giving SBRT and hormone therapy may be an effective treatment for prostate cancer.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Bicalutamide and Raloxifene Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    This phase II pilot trial studies how well bicalutamide and raloxifene hydrochloride work in treating patients with prostate cancer undergoing surgery. Antihormone therapy, such as bicalutamide and raloxifene hydrochloride, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body.
    Location: Mayo Clinic in Arizona, Scottsdale, Arizona

  • Ribociclib and Bicalutamide in AR+ TNBC

    This is an open label, multi-institutional, single arm phase II trial of ribociclib in combination with bicalutamide in advanced AR+ triple-negative breast cancer. No randomization or blinding is involved.
    Location: University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Madison, Wisconsin

  • Androgen Deprivation Therapy, Docetaxel, External Beam Radiation Therapy, and Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies the side effects of androgen deprivation therapy, docetaxel, external beam radiation therapy, and stereotactic body radiation therapy work in treating patients with prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy, such as leuprolide acetate, triptorelin, degarelix, and bicalutamide may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. External beam radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends x-rays directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving androgen deprivation therapy, docetaxel, external beam radiation therapy, and stereotactic body radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Johns Hopkins University / Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, Maryland

  • Bicalutamide with or without Metformin Hydrochloride in Lowering PSA Levels in Overweight or Obese Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies bicalutamide with or without metformin hydrochloride in lowering prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels in overweight or obese patients with prostate cancer. Androgen receptors are proteins that attach to male hormones (androgens) causing prostate cancer cells to grow. Bicalutamide blocks these proteins and may keep cancer cells from growing. Metformin hydrochloride may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether bicalutamide with or without metformin hydrochloride is a better treatment for prostate cancer biochemical recurrence.
    Location: Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

  • High-Dose Brachytherapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and how well high-dose brachytherapy works in treating patients with prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body. Brachytherapy is a type of radiation therapy in which radioactive material sealed in needles, seeds, wires, or catheters is placed directly into or near a tumor and may be a better treatment in patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy with Stereotactic Radiosurgery Boost and Hormone Therapy in Treating Patients with Prostate Cancer

    This clinical trial studies intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with stereotactic radiosurgery boost and hormone therapy in treating patients with prostate cancer. Specialized radiation therapy, such as IMRT and stereotactic radiosurgery, that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Androgen hormones can cause the growth of prostate cancer cells and antihormone therapy drugs, such as leuprolide acetate, goserelin acetate, and bicalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgens made by the body. Giving IMRT with stereotactic radiosurgery boost and androgen deprivation therapy may be an effective treatment for prostate cancer.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Androgen Deprivation Therapy, Pembrolizumab, and High Dose Rate Brachytherapy with or without TLR9 Agonist SD-101 in Treating Patients with Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well androgen deprivation therapy, pembrolizumab, and high dose rate brachytherapy with or without TLR9 agonist SD-101 in treating patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Androgen can cause the growth of tumor cells. Androgen deprivation therapy, such as leuprolide acetate and bicalutamide, may lessen the amount of androgen made by the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Brachytherapy, also known as internal radiation therapy, uses radioactive material placed directly into or near a tumor to kill tumor cells. Colony-stimulating factors, such as TLR9 agonist SD-101, may increase the production of blood cells. It is not yet know whether giving androgen deprivation therapy, pembrolizumab, and high dose rate brachytherapy with or without TLR9 agonist SD-101 may work better in treating patients with prostate cancer.
    Location: UCSF Medical Center-Mount Zion, San Francisco, California