Clinical Trials Using Bortezomib

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Bortezomib. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 36
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  • Bortezomib or Carfilzomib with Lenalidomide and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    This randomized phase III trial studies bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone to see how well they work compared to carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patients with newly diagnosed multiple myeloma. Bortezomib and carfilzomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Lenalidomide may help the immune system kill abnormal blood cells or cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as dexamethasone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether bortezomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone are more or less effective than carfilzomib, lenalidomide, and dexamethasone in treating patients with multiple myeloma
    Location: 815 locations

  • Standard-Dose Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone or High-Dose Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This randomized phase III trial studies standard-dose lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone (RVD) to see how well it works compared to high-dose RVD followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) in treating patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Giving RVD before a PBSCT may help stop the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing, killing them, blocking the enzymes needed for cell growth, or stimulating the immune system. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient’s blood and stored. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by RVD combination therapy. It is not yet known whether standard-dose RVD is more effective than high-dose RVD followed by PBSCT in treating MM.
    Location: 51 locations

  • Study Comparing Daratumumab, Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone (D-RVd) Versus Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone (RVd) in Subjects With Newly Diagnosed Multiple Myeloma

    The purpose of this study is to determine if the addition of daratumumab to lenalidomide-bortezomib-dexamethasone (RVd) will increase the proportion of participants achieving stringent complete response (sCR), as defined by the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) criteria, by the time of completion of post autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) consolidation treatment, compared with RVd alone.
    Location: 26 locations

  • Bortezomib, Vorinostat, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat and to see how well it works when given together with bortezomib and combination chemotherapy in treating infants (patients less than 1 year old) with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Bortezomib and vorinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, hydrocortisone, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) with bortezomib and vorinostat may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation With Ixazomib for High Risk Multiple Myeloma (BMT CTN 1302)

    This study is designed to compare progression-free survival (PFS) from randomization among patients randomized on the BMT CTN 1302 protocol, "Multicenter Phase II, Double-blind Placebo Controlled Trial of Maintenance Ixazomib after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for High Risk Multiple Myeloma". It is hypothesized that Ixazomib maintenance therapy will result in improved PFS in patients with high-risk multiple myeloma following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) compared to placebo.
    Location: 14 locations

  • PI3K Delta / Gamma Inhibitor IPI-145 and Romidepsin or Bortezomib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory T-cell Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of PI3K delta / gamma inhibitor IPI-145 when given together with romidepsin or bortezomib in treating patients with T-cell lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. PI3K delta / gamma inhibitor IPI-145, romidepsin, and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Elotuzumab, Pomalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well elotuzumab, pomalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as elotuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Pomalidomide may enhance or suppress the reaction of the immune system to a stimulus which may help the body destroy cancer cells. Bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Dexamethasone may act against cancer cells and prevent inflammation in a wide variety of organs. Giving elotuzumab, pomalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone may work better in treating patients with multiple myeloma.
    Location: 7 locations

  • A Study of JNJ-54767414 (HuMax CD38) (Anti-CD38 Monoclonal Antibody) in Combination With Backbone Treatments for the Treatment of Patients With Multiple Myeloma

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and dose regimen of daratumumab when administered in combination with various treatment regimens for the treatment of multiple myeloma.
    Location: 6 locations

  • A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Daratumumab in Combination With Cyclophosphamide, Bortezomib and Dexamethasone (CyBorD) Compared to CyBorD Alone in Newly Diagnosed Systemic Amyloid Light-chain (AL) Amyloidosis

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of daratumumab plus cyclophosphamide, bortezomib and dexamethasone (CyBorD) compared with CyBorD alone in treatment of newly diagnosed amyloid light chain (AL) amyloidosis participants.
    Location: 5 locations

  • An Open-Label Study of a Novel JAK-inhibitor, INCB052793, Given to Patients With Advanced Malignancies

    This is a study of INCB052793 given to patients with advanced malignancies that will be conducted in three phases; Phase 1a (Monotherapy) and Phase 1b (Combination Therapy) and Phase 2 (Combination therapy of INCB052793 with azacitidine and itacitinib with azacitidine). Phase 1 will have two parts; a dose escalation (Part 1) and an expansion (Part 2).
    Location: 6 locations

  • Alisertib, Bortezomib, and Rituximab in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma or B-cell Low Grade Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of alisertib and bortezomib when given together with rituximab in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma or B-cell low grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Alisertib and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving alisertib and bortezomib together with rituximab may be a better treatment for relapsed or refractory mantle cell lymphoma or B-cell low grade non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Panobinostat / Bortezomib / Dexamethasone in Relapsed or Relapsed-and-refractory Multiple Myeloma

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the safety and efficacy of three different regimens of PAN (20 mg TIW, 20 mg BIW, and 10 mg TIW) in combination with s.c. BTZ and Dex and to provide exposure, safety and efficacy data to identify the optimal regimen of PAN in a randomized, 3-arm parallel design. This study will also assess the impact of administering s.c. BTZ (in combination with PAN and Dex) twice weekly for 4 cycles, and then weekly starting from Cycle 5 until disease progression in patients ≤ 75 years of age. Patients > 75 years of age will receive for the entire treatment period s.c. BTZ weekly (in combination with PAN and Dex) until disease progression. Patients will be treated until disease progression or until they discontinue earlier due to unacceptable toxicity or for other reasons. Patients who discontinued study treatment for reasons other than disease progression will be followed for efficacy every 6 weeks. All patients will be followed for survival until the last patient entering long-term follow-up has completed a 3 year survival follow-up or discontinued earlier.
    Location: 4 locations

  • Selinexor and Backbone Treatments of Multiple Myeloma Patients

    This study will independently assess the efficacy and safety of four combination therapies for the treatment of patients with relapsed / refractory multiple myeloma (RR MM): selinexor + pomalidomide + dexamethasone (SPd), selinexor + bortezomib + dexamethasone (SVd), selinexor + lenalidomide+ dexamethasone (SRd), and selinexor + daratumumab + dexamethasone (SDd). The abbreviations for combination treatments have been revised to use V (Velcade) for bortezomib and R (Revlimid) for lenalidomide.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Study Testing Radium-223 Dichloride in Relapsed Multiple Myeloma

    This study will be conducted in 2 parts. The phase 1b part will be an international, phase 1b, open-label, dose-escalation assessment of radium-223 dichloride administered with bortezomib and dexamethasone in subjects with relapsed multiple myeloma. The primary endpoint is to determine the optimal dose of radium-223 dichloride in combination with bortezomib / dexamethasone for the Phase 2 portion of the study. The phase 2 part will be an international, phase 2, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled assessment of radium-223 dichloride versus placebo administered with bortezomib and dexamethasone, in subjects with relapsed multiple myeloma. Up to approximately 30 total subjects in all dose cohorts combined will be treated in the phase 1b part of the study and approximately 196 subjects will be enrolled in the phase 2 part of the study.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Pediatric Precision Laboratory Advanced Neuroblastoma Therapy

    A prospective open label, multicenter study to evaluate the feasibility and acute toxicity of using molecularly guided therapy in combination with standard therapy followed by maintenance therapy with DFMO in subjects with newly diagnosed high risk neuroblastoma.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Bortezomib and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients with Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome after Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of bortezomib when given together with lenalidomide in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome that has come back after donor stem cell transplant. Bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Lenalidomide may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. It may also stop the growth of acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for tumor growth. Giving bortezomib together with lenalidomide may be a better treatment for acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Natural History of Targeted Antiviral and Cancer Therapy in Treating Patients with KSHV-Associated Multicentric Castleman Disease

    This clinical trial studies the natural history of targeted antiviral and cancer therapy in treating patients with Kaposi’s sarcoma herpes virus (KSHV)-associated multicentric Castleman disease (MCD). Gathering information over time about patients with KHSV-associated MCD receiving antiviral therapy, monoclonal antibody therapy, and combination chemotherapy may help doctors learn more about the disease and find better methods of treatment and on-going care.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This randomized phase II / III trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy and how well it works in treating patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Ruxolitinib Phosphate and Bortezomib in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of ruxolitinib phosphate and bortezomib in treating patients with relapsed or refractory lymphoma. Ruxolitinib phosphate and bortezomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan

  • Panobinostat, Bortezomib, and Vincristine Sulfate Liposome with Re-induction Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed or Refractory T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well panobinostat, bortezomib, and vincristine sulfate liposome and re-induction therapy (strong chemotherapy) work in treating younger patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia or lymphoma that has returned (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Panobinostat and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as mitoxantrone hydrochloride, pegaspargase, dexamethasone, cytarabine, vincristine sulfate liposome, methotrexate, mercaptopurine, nelarabine, cyclophosphamide, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panobinostat, bortezomib, and vincristine sulfate liposome together with re-induction therapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee

  • Wild-Type Reovirus, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Multiple Myeloma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects and best dose of wild-type reovirus in combination with bortezomib and dexamethasone and to see how well they work in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). A virus, called wild-type reovirus, may be able to infect cancer cells and slow the cancer growth and kill cancer cells. Bortezomib and dexamethasone may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving wild-type reovirus together with bortezomib and dexamethasone may be a better treatment for multiple myeloma.
    Location: USC / Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, California

  • Study of DFMO in Combination With Bortezomib for Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma

    The purpose of this research study is to evaluate an investigational drug (DFMO) in combination with bortezomib, for relapsed and refractory neuroblastoma. DFMO is an investigational drug because it has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This study will look at the safety and tolerability of DFMO in combination with bortezomib as well as the tumors response to this study drug.
    Location: Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina

  • Bortezomib and Pegylated Liposomal Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies how well bortezomib and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride work in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia that got worse after prior therapy, did not get better with the first treatment, or is not a good candidate for standard treatment. Bortezomib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving bortezomib with pegylated liposomal doxorubicin hydrochloride may be an effective treatment for acute myeloid leukemia.
    Location: University of California Davis Comprehensive Cancer Center, Sacramento, California

  • Sorafenib, Vorinostat, and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of sorafenib, vorinostat, and bortezomib and to see how well it works in treating patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Sorafenib, vorinostat, and bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.
    Location: Indiana University / Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, Indianapolis, Indiana

  • Bortezomib, Total Marrow Irradiation, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Melphalan in Treating Patients Undergoing Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant for High-Risk Stage I or II Multiple Myeloma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of bortezomib when given together with fludarabine phosphate and melphalan with or without total marrow irradiation in treating patients undergoing donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant for high-risk stage I or II multiple myeloma. Bortezomib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving chemotherapy drugs, such as fludarabine phosphate and melphalan, and total marrow irradiation before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells and helps stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California


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