Clinical Trials Using Panitumumab

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Panitumumab. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-10 of 10
  • Cabozantinib-S-Malate and Panitumumab in Treating Patients with Colorectal Cancer That is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This phase Ib / II trial studies the safety and best dose of cabozantinib-s-malate when given together with panitumumab in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other parts of the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Panitumumab is a monoclonal antibody that blocks the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib-s-malate with panitumumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Panitumumab and Combination Chemotherapy with or without Hepatic Arterial Infusion in Treating Patients with Wild Type RAS Colorectal Cancer Metastatic in the Liver That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well panitumumab and combination chemotherapy with or without hepatic arterial infusion work in treating patients with wild type RAS colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as floxuridine, dexamethasone, leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and irinotecan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Hepatic arterial infusion uses a catheter to carry tumor-killing substances directly into the liver. Giving panitumumab and combination chemotherapy with or without hepatic arterial infusion may kill more tumor cells and allow patients to have liver tumors removed surgically.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Panitumumab in Treating Patients with Colorectal Cancer with Liver Metastases Previously Treated with Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well combination chemotherapy together with or without panitumumab works in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to the liver previously treated with surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as floxuridine, irinotecan hydrochloride, fluorouracil, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) uses a catheter to carry cancer-killing substances directly into the liver. Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving floxuridine via HAI and combination chemotherapy with or without panitumumab works better in treating colorectal cancer.
    Location: 6 locations

  • Panitumumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Previously Treated with Combination Chemotherapy and Bevacizumab

    This phase II trial studies how well panitumumab and combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body and has previously been treated with combination chemotherapy and bevacizumab. Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Others find tumor cells and help kill them or carry tumor-killing substances to them. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as leucovorin calcium, fluorouracil, and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab and combination chemotherapy together may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Carboplatin and Paclitaxel with or without Panitumumab in Treating Patients with Invasive Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without panitumumab work in treating patients with invasive triple negative breast cancer. Drugs used in the chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping the them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving carboplatin and paclitaxel with or without panitumumab before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Women’s MoonShot: Neoadjuvant Treatment with PaCT for Patients with Locally Advanced TNBC

    This phase II trial studies how well panitumumab, carboplatin and paclitaxel work in treating patients with newly diagnosed triple negative breast cancer that is limited to the breast and possibly to the nearby lymph nodes. This treatment study is linked to NCI-2015-00191 protocol, which uses a baseline biopsy to determine the neoadjuvant therapy that matches the sub-type of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC). Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carboplatin and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving panitumumab, carboplatin and paclitaxel before surgery may be an effective treatment for breast cancer by making the tumor smaller and reducing the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Ganitumab, Everolimus, and Panitumumab in Treating Patients with Refractory Solid Tumors

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of ganitumab, everolimus, and panitumumab when given together in treating patients with solid tumors that has not responded to previous treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ganitumab and panitumumab, can block the ability of tumors to grow and spread by blocking protein activity which is important for tumors to grow. Everolimus may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving ganitumab with everolimus and panitumumab may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy In Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Cancer of the Oropharynx and Human Papillomavirus Infection

    This phase II trial studies how well giving combination chemotherapy together with radiation therapy works in treating patients with locally advanced stage III-IV squamous cell cancer of the oropharynx and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as docetaxel, cisplatin, and fluorouracil (5-FU), work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving combination chemotherapy together with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: See Clinical Trials.gov

  • Panitumumab with or without Trametinib in Treating Patients with Stage IV Colorectal Cancer

    This phase II clinical trial studies how well panitumumab with or without trametinib works in treating patients with stage IV colorectal cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as panitumumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Trametinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving panitumumab with or without trametinib may work better in treating patients with stage IV colorectal cancer.
    Location: M D Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas

  • Panitumumab-IRDye800 in Detecting Cancer in Patients with Head and Neck Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of panitumumab-IRDye800 in detecting cancer in patients with head and neck cancer undergoing surgery. Panitumumab-IRDye800 is a drug that attaches to cancer cells and makes them visible to doctors through a special camera that can be used during surgery. Panitumumab works by attaching to the cancer cell in a unique way that allows the drug to get into the cancer tissue. IRDye800 is a dye that helps human tissue show up better when using the special camera. Panitumumab carries the dye into the cancer tissue, which allows doctors to see where the cancer is using a camera. Panitumumab-IRDye800 may allow doctors to see tumors more accurately and remove them successfully during surgery.
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California