Clinical Trials Using Sipuleucel-T

  • Resize font
  • Print
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Sipuleucel-T. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-6 of 6
  • Sipuleucel-T with or without Radium Ra 223 Dichloride in Treating Patients with Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Bone-Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well sipuleucel-T with or without radium Ra 223 dichloride works in treating patients with asymptomatic (no signs or symptoms of disease) or minimally symptomatic hormone-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to the bone (metastasis). Sipuleucel-T is made of immune system cells collected from patients with prostate cancer that are treated in the laboratory with a protein that is made by combining a protein found on prostate cancer cells with a growth factor. When the cells are injected back into the patient, they may stimulate T cells to kill prostate cancer cells. Radium 223 dichloride contains a radioactive substance called radium 223. Radium 223 collects in bone and gives off radiation that may kill cancer cells. It is not yet know whether sipuleucel-T with or without radium Ra 223 dichloride works is an effective treatment for patients with bone-metastasis hormone resistant prostate cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Immediate or Delayed Ipilimumab after Sipuleucel-T Treatment in Treating Patients with Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies the effects of taking ipilimumab as an immediate or delayed treatment after sipuleucel-T treatment on hormone-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Sipuleucel-T uses the immune system to fight the disease and attack prostate cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab, block the ability of tumor to grow and spread. Ipilimumab blocks different components of the immune system in order to enhance the immune system’s ability to fight diseases. It is not yet known whether giving ipilimumab as an immediate treatment or as a delayed treatment is more effective in treating prostate cancer.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Atezolizumab and Sipuleucel-T in Treating Patients with Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Metastatic Castrate Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This randomized phase Ib trial study will assess the sequence of the administration of atezolizumab and sipuleucel-T and to see how well they work in treating patients with castration resistant metastatic prostate cancer without symptoms or with minimal symptoms. Atezolizumab may enhance the body's ability to recognize abnormal, tumor cells. Vaccines, such as sipuleucel-T, made from a person’s white blood cells mixed with tumor proteins may help the body build an effective immune response to kill prostate tumor cells. Thus giving atezolizumab and sipuleucel-T may work better in treating patients with castration resistant metastatic prostate cancer.
    Location: University of Hawaii Cancer Center, Honolulu, Hawaii

  • Sipuleucel-T and Stereotactic Ablative Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    This phase II trial studies how well sipuleucel-T and stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy work in treating patients with prostate cancer that does not respond to hormone therapy (hormone-resistant) that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Vaccines made from a person’s white blood cells mixed with tumor proteins may help the body build an effective immune response to kill prostate cancer cells. Stereotactic radiosurgery, also known as stereotactic body radiation therapy or stereotactic ablation radiation therapy, is a specialized radiation therapy that delivers a single, high dose of radiation directly to the tumor and may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving sipuleucel-T with stereotactic ablative body radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: UT Southwestern / Simmons Cancer Center-Dallas, Dallas, Texas

  • Immune Activation in Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Receiving Sipuleucel-T Immunotherapy

    This randomized, pilot phase I trial studies immune activation in tumor-bearing lymph nodes and blood samples from patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body receiving treatment with sipuleucel-T. Sipuleucel-T is made from immune system cells collected from a patient with prostate cancer. The cells are treated with a protein that is made by combining a protein found on prostate cancer cells with a growth factor. When the cells are injected back into the patient, they may stimulate T cells to kill prostate cancer cells. Studying samples of tissue and blood in the laboratory from patients receiving sipuleucel-T may help doctors learn more about the effects of sipuleucel-T against tumor cells.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Cardiorespiratory Function in Patients with Metastatic Hormone-Resistant Prostate Cancer Undergoing Treatment with Sipuleucel-T, Abiraterone Acetate, or Enzalutamide

    This pilot research trial studies cardiorespiratory function in patients with prostate cancer that has spread to other places in the body and does not respond to treatment with hormones, and are undergoing treatment with sipuleucel-T, abiraterone acetate, or enzalutamide. Both enzalutamide and abiraterone can cause cardiorespiratory side effects, however, exactly how these affect aerobic capacity has not been defined. In contrast, sipuleucel-T is not known to cause cardiorespiratory side effects. Understanding how each of these treatments influences aerobic capacity, which is also a predictor of quality of life, may allow for better treatment strategies for prostate cancer.
    Location: Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina