Clinical Trials Using Carmustine

  • Resize font
  • Print
  • Email
  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Google+
  • Pinterest

Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Carmustine. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-12 of 12
  • Ibrutinib before and after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies ibrutinib to see how well it works compared to placebo when given before and after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Before transplant, stem cells are taken from patients and stored. Patients then receive high doses of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells and make room for healthy cells. After treatment, the stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Ibrutinib is a drug that may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein that is needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether adding ibrutinib to chemotherapy before and after stem cell transplant may help the transplant work better in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 243 locations

  • Chemotherapy, Stem Cell Transplant, and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, stem cell transplant, and romidepsin work in treating patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. The patient’s stem cells that were previously collected are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin following stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Carmustine, Etoposide, Cytarabine, Melphalan, and Antithymocyte Globulin Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Autoimmune Neurologic Disease That Did Not Respond to Previous Therapy

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and how well carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine and melphalan together with antithymocyte globulin before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant works in treating patients with autoimmune neurologic disease that did not respond to previous therapy. In autoimmune neurological diseases, the patient’s own immune system ‘attacks’ the nervous system which might include the brain / spinal cord and / or the peripheral nerves. Giving high-dose chemotherapy, including carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan, and antithymocyte globulin, before a peripheral blood stem cell transplant weakens the immune system and may help stop the immune system from ‘attacking’ a patient's nervous system. When the patient’s own (autologous) stem cells are infused into the patient they help the bone marrow make red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets so the blood counts can improve.
    Location: 3 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Donor Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Ixazomib Citrate Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed High-Risk Multiple Myeloma

    This phase Ib trial studies the side effects of combination chemotherapy and donor stem cell transplant followed by ixazomib citrate maintenance therapy in treating patients with multiple myeloma that has returned after a period of improvement and is likely to recur (come back), or spread. Giving chemotherapy before a donor peripheral blood stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Giving ixazomib citrate after the transplant may improve the overall treatment outcome without causing additional toxicities.
    Location: 2 locations

  • Chemotherapy with or without Total Body Irradiation before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before stem cell transplantation works in treating patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy, such as total body irradiation, uses high energy x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. It is not known whether chemotherapy with or without total body irradiation before stem cell transplant works better in treating patients with Hodgkin or non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: University of Minnesota / Masonic Cancer Center, Minneapolis, Minnesota

  • Blinatumomab after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma or Transformed Large Cell Lymphoma

    This pilot phase I trial studies how well blinatumomab works after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma or transformed large cell lymphoma. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells and improve response to the transplant.
    Location: Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri

  • HIV-Resistant Gene Modified Stem Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Lymphoma with HIV Infection

    This pilot phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-resistant gene modified stem cells in treating HIV-positive patients who are undergoing first-line treatment for Hodgkin or Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma. Stem cells are collected from the patient and HIV-resistance genes are placed into the stem cells. The stem cells are then re-infused into the patient. These genetically modified stem cells may help the body make cells that are resistant to HIV infection.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Yttrium Y 90 Basiliximab and Combination Chemotherapy before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Mature T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of yttrium Y 90 basiliximab when given together with standard combination chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant in treating patients with mature T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Radioactive substances linked to monoclonal antibodies, such as yttrium Y 90 basiliximab, can bind to cancer cells and give off radiation which may help kill cancer cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, cytarabine, etoposide, and melphalan (BEAM), work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving yttrium Y 90 basiliximab and chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant may help kill any cancer cells that are in the body and help make room in the patient’s bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. Stem cells that were collected from the patient's blood and stored before treatment are later returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Conventional and Regulatory T Cells in Treating Patients with Advanced Hematologic Malignancies Undergoing T Cell-Depleted Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of conventional T cells and regulatory T cells and to see how well they work in treating patients with hematologic malignancies that have spread to other places in the body and are undergoing T cell-depleted donor stem cell transplant. Giving chemotherapy and total body irradiation before a donor stem cell transplant helps stop the growth of cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a donor are infused into the patient they may help the patient's bone marrow make stem cells, red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells. Removing the T cells from the donor cells before transplant may stop this from happening. Giving an infusion of the donor's T cells (donor lymphocyte infusion) later may help the patient's immune system see any remaining cancer cells as not belonging in the patient's body and destroy them (called graft-versus-tumor effect).
    Location: Stanford Cancer Institute Palo Alto, Palo Alto, California

  • Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibody Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy before Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Primary Refractory or Relapsed Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy when given together with combination chemotherapy before stem cell transplant and to see how well it works in treating patients with Hodgkin lymphoma that is primary refractory (did not respond to treatment) or relapsed (returned after treatment). Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies can find cancer cells and carry cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, and melphalan (BEAM), work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy together with combination chemotherapy may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: City of Hope Comprehensive Cancer Center, Duarte, California

  • Autologous Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Followed by Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Patients with High-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, Multiple Myeloma, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    This phase II trial studies autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant followed by donor bone marrow transplant in treating patients with high-risk Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Autologous stem cell transplantation uses the patient’s stem cells and does not cause graft versus host disease (GVHD) and has a very low risk of death, while minimizing the number of cancer cells. Peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplant uses stem cells from the patient or a donor and may be able to replace immune cells that were destroyed by chemotherapy. These donated stem cells may help destroy cancer cells. Bone marrow transplant known as a nonmyeloablative transplant uses stem cells from a haploidentical family donor. Autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant followed by donor bone marrow transplant may work better in treating patients with high-risk Hodgkin lymphoma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, multiple myeloma, or chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    Location: Fred Hutch / University of Washington Cancer Consortium, Seattle, Washington

  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients with Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called “anti-HIV genes” are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.
    Location: 3 locations