Clinical Trials Using Cyclophosphamide

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Cyclophosphamide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 314
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  • Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide Followed by Paclitaxel with or without Carboplatin in Treating Patients with Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide followed by paclitaxel with or without carboplatin work in treating patients with triple-negative breast cancer. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide is more effective when followed by paclitaxel alone or paclitaxel and carboplatin in treating triple-negative breast cancer.
    Location: 1192 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed BCR-ABL-Negative B Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy with blinatumomab to see how well it works compared to induction chemotherapy alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-c-abl oncogene 1, non-receptor tyrosine kinase (ABL)-negative B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without blinatumomab in treating newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 422 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Ganitumab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without ganitumab works in treating patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma that has spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ganitumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without ganitumab in treating patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma.
    Location: 294 locations

  • Ibrutinib before and after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies ibrutinib to see how well it works compared to placebo when given before and after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Before transplant, stem cells are taken from patients and stored. Patients then receive high doses of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells and make room for healthy cells. After treatment, the stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Ibrutinib is a drug that may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein that is needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether adding ibrutinib to chemotherapy before and after stem cell transplant may help the transplant work better in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 243 locations

  • Risk-Adapted Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly Diagnosed Standard-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Localized B-Lineage Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies the side effects of different combinations of risk-adapted chemotherapy regimens and how well they work in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia or B-lineage lymphoblastic lymphoma that is found only in the tissue or organ where it began (localized). Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy), giving the drugs in different doses, and giving the drugs in different combinations may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 213 locations

  • PET-Directed Therapy in Treating Patients with Limited-Stage Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well positron emission tomography (PET)-directed chemotherapy works in treating patients with limited-stage diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill cancer cells. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, can block cancer growth in different ways. Some block the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Others find cancer cells and help kill them or carry cancer-killing substances to them. Radio labeled monoclonal antibodies, such as yttrium Y 90 ibritumomab tiuxetan, can find cancer cells and carry cancer-killing substances to them without harming normal cells. Comparing results of diagnostic procedures, such as PET scan and computed tomography (CT) scan, done before, during, and after chemotherapy may help doctors predict a patient's response to treatment and help plan the best treatment.
    Location: 378 locations

  • Response and Biology-Based Risk Factor-Guided Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Non-high Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.
    Location: 186 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children and Young Adults with Stage IIB or Stage IIIB-IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy to see how well they work compared to combination chemotherapy alone in treating children and young adults with stage IIB or stage IIIB-IVB Hodgkin lymphoma. Combinations of biological substances in brentuximab vedotin may be able to carry cancer-killing substances directly to Hodgkin lymphoma cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, bleomycin sulfate, vincristine sulfate, etoposide, prednisone, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known if combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without brentuximab vedotin in treating Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 174 locations

  • Maintenance Chemotherapy or Observation Following Induction Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Ependymoma

    This partially randomized phase III trial is studying maintenance chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to observation following induction chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating young patients with newly diagnosed ependymoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.
    Location: 178 locations

  • Obinutuzumab with or without PI3K-delta Inhibitor TGR-1202, Lenalidomide, or Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Grade I-IIIa Follicular Lymphoma

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well obinutuzumab with or without PI3K-delta inhibitor TGR-1202, lenalidomide, or combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with grade I-IIIa follicular lymphoma that has come back or does not respond to treatment. Monoclonal antibodies, such as obinutuzumab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. PI3K-delta inhibitor TGR-1202 may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Biological therapies, such as lenalidomide, use substances made from living organisms that may stimulate or suppress the immune system in different ways and stop cancer cells from growing. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving obinutuzumab with or without PI3K-delta inhibitor TGR-1202, lenalidomide, or combination chemotherapy will work better in treating patients with grade I-IIIa follicular lymphoma.
    Location: 173 locations

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works compared with standard combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether standard combination chemotherapy is more effective than blinatumomab in treating relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 158 locations

  • Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Young Patients with Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated, High-Risk Medulloblastoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies different chemotherapy and radiation therapy regimens to compare how well they work in treating young patients with newly diagnosed, previously untreated, high-risk medulloblastoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, cisplatin, cyclophosphamide, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Carboplatin may make tumor cells more sensitive to radiation therapy. It is not yet known which chemotherapy and radiation therapy regimen is more effective in treating brain tumors.
    Location: 177 locations

  • Azacitidine and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and KMT2A Gene Rearrangement

    This pilot phase II trial studies the side effects of azacitidine and combination chemotherapy in infants with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and KMT2A gene rearrangement. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, prednisolone, daunorubicin hydrochloride, cytarabine, dexamethasone, vincristine sulfate, pegaspargase, hydrocortisone sodium succinate, azacitidine, cyclophosphamide, mercaptopurine, leucovorin calcium, and thioguanine work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug may kill more cancer cells.
    Location: 120 locations

  • Reduced Craniospinal Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly Diagnosed WNT-Driven Medulloblastoma

    This phase II trial studies how well reduced doses of radiation therapy to the brain and spine (craniospinal) and chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed type of brain tumor called WNT) / Wingless (WNT)-driven medulloblastoma. Recent studies using chemotherapy and radiation therapy have been shown to be effective in treating patients with WNT-driven medulloblastoma. However, there is a concern about the late side effects of treatment, such as learning difficulties, lower amounts of hormones, or other problems in performing daily activities. Radiotherapy uses high-energy radiation from x-rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide and lomustine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving reduced craniospinal radiation therapy and chemotherapy may kill tumor cells and may also reduce the late side effects of treatment.
    Location: 77 locations

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 56 locations

  • Standard-Dose Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone or High-Dose Lenalidomide, Bortezomib, and Dexamethasone Followed by Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Multiple Myeloma

    This randomized phase III trial studies standard-dose lenalidomide, bortezomib, and dexamethasone (RVD) to see how well it works compared to high-dose RVD followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) in treating patients with multiple myeloma (MM). Giving RVD before a PBSCT may help stop the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing, killing them, blocking the enzymes needed for cell growth, or stimulating the immune system. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient’s blood and stored. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by RVD combination therapy. It is not yet known whether standard-dose RVD is more effective than high-dose RVD followed by PBSCT in treating MM.
    Location: 51 locations

  • Double Cord Versus Haploidentical (BMT CTN 1101)

    Hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT)are one treatment option for people with leukemia or lymphoma. Family members,unrelated donors or banked umbilical cordblood units with similar tissue type can be used for HCT. This study will compare the effectiveness of two new types of bone marrow transplants in people with leukemia or lymphoma: one that uses bone marrow donated from family members with only partially matched bone marrow; and, one that uses two partially matched cord blood units.
    Location: 22 locations

  • Cisplatin or Doxorubicin Hydrochloride and Cyclophosphamide before Surgery in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer and BRCA Mutations

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well cisplatin or doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide before surgery work in treating patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer with an inherited mutation (a change in the deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] sequence of a cell) in the breast cancer early onset 1 (BRCA1) or BRCA2 gene. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, doxorubicin hydrochloride, and cyclophosphamide work in different way to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before surgery may make the tumor smaller and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed. It is not yet known whether cisplatin is more effective than doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide when given before surgery in treating patients with breast cancer.
    Location: 21 locations

  • Clinical and Molecular Risk-Directed Craniospinal Irradiation and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients with Newly Diagnosed Medulloblastoma

    This partially randomized clinical trial studies clinical and molecular risk-directed craniospinal irradiation and combination chemotherapy in treating younger patients with newly diagnosed medulloblastoma. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, vincristine sulfate, vismodegib, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and pemetrexed disodium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving clinical and molecular risk-directed radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 13 locations

  • Chemotherapy before and after Donor Bone Marrow Transplant in Treating Younger Patients with Hematologic Cancer

    This pilot phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy before and after a donor bone marrow transplant works in treating younger patients with hematologic cancer. Giving chemotherapy and total-body irradiation before a donor bone marrow transplant helps stop the growth of cells in the bone marrow, including normal blood-forming cells (stem cells) and cancer cells. It may also stop the patient's immune system from rejecting the donor's stem cells. When the healthy stem cells from a related donor, that do not exactly match the patient’s blood, are infused into the patient they may replace the patient’s immune cells and help destroy any remaining cancer cells. Sometimes the transplanted cells from a donor can make an immune response against the body's normal cells called graft-versus-host disease. Giving cyclophosphamide after the transplant may stop this from happening.
    Location: 14 locations

  • Bortezomib, Vorinostat, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat and to see how well it works when given together with bortezomib and combination chemotherapy in treating infants (patients less than 1 year old) with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Bortezomib and vorinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, hydrocortisone, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) with bortezomib and vorinostat may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 11 locations

  • A Study Evaluating KTE-C19 in Adult Subjects With Relapsed / Refractory B-precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (r / r ALL) (ZUMA-3)

    This is a single arm, open-label, multi-center, phase 1 / 2 study, to determine the safety and efficacy of KTE-C19, an autologous anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-positive T cell therapy, in relapsed / refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).
    Location: 13 locations

  • Scleroderma Treatment with Autologous Transplant (STAT) Study

    This phase II trial studies how well giving cyclophosphamide and anti-thymocyte globulin together followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplant (PBSCT) and mycophenolate mofetil works in treating patients with systemic scleroderma (SSc). Stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored prior to treatment. To store the stem cells patients are given colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim (G-CSF) or chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide) to help stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. After storage, patients are then given high-dose chemotherapy, cyclophosphamide, and immunosuppression with anti-thymocyte globulin to suppress the immune system to prepare for the transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy and immunosuppression. After the stem cells have “engrafted” and have matured enough to support the immune system at approximately 2-3 months, patients are given a medication called mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) or Myfortic. This medication is given to prevent worsening or reactivation of SSc and is referred to as maintenance therapy.
    Location: 14 locations

  • I-SPY 2 TRIAL: Neoadjuvant and Personalized Adaptive Novel Agents to Treat Breast Cancer

    The purpose of this study is to further advance the ability to practice personalized medicine by learning which new drug agents are most effective with which types of breast cancer tumors and by learning more about which early indicators of response (tumor analysis prior to surgery via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) images along with tissue and blood samples) are predictors of treatment success.
    Location: 14 locations

  • A Phase 2 Multicenter Study Evaluating Subjects With Relapsed / Refractory Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    Study KTE-C19-102 is a phase 2, multicenter, open-label study evaluating the efficacy of KTE-C19 in subjects with Relapsed / Refractory MCL
    Location: 13 locations


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