Clinical Trials Using Etoposide

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Clinical trials are research studies that involve people. The clinical trials on this list are studying Etoposide. All trials on the list are supported by NCI.

NCI’s basic information about clinical trials explains the types and phases of trials and how they are carried out. Clinical trials look at new ways to prevent, detect, or treat disease. You may want to think about taking part in a clinical trial. Talk to your doctor for help in deciding if one is right for you.

Trials 1-25 of 116
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  • Three Different Radiation Therapy Regimens in Treating Patients with Limited-Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer Receiving Cisplatin or Carboplatin and Etoposide

    This randomized phase III trial is comparing three different chest radiation therapy regimens to see how well they work in treating patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, cisplatin, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known which radiation therapy regimen is more effective when given together with chemotherapy in treating patients with limited-stage small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 860 locations

  • Cisplatin, Carboplatin and Etoposide or Temozolomide and Capecitabine in Treating Patients with Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Gastrointestinal Tract or Pancreas That Is Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well temozolomide and capecitabine work compared to standard treatment with cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide in treating patients with neuroendocrine carcinoma of the gastrointestinal tract or pancreas that has spread to other parts of the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, capecitabine, cisplatin, carboplatin and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Certain types of neuroendocrine carcinomas may respond better to treatments other than the current standard treatment of cisplatin and etoposide. It is not yet known whether temozolomide and capecitabine may work better than cisplatin or carboplatin and etoposide in treating patients with this type of neuroendocrine carcinoma, called non-small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma.
    Location: 474 locations

  • Active Surveillance, Bleomycin, Carboplatin, Etoposide, or Cisplatin in Treating Pediatric and Adult Patients with Germ Cell Tumors

    This partially randomized phase III trial studies how well active surveillance, bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, or cisplatin work in treating pediatric and adult patients with germ cell tumors. Active surveillance may help doctors to monitor subjects with low risk germ cell tumors after their tumor is removed. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as bleomycin, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading.
    Location: 347 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Blinatumomab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed BCR-ABL-Negative B Lineage Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy with blinatumomab to see how well it works compared to induction chemotherapy alone in treating patients with newly diagnosed breakpoint cluster region (BCR)-c-abl oncogene 1, non-receptor tyrosine kinase (ABL)-negative B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may block cancer growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without blinatumomab in treating newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 422 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy with or without Ganitumab in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy with or without ganitumab works in treating patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma that has spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ganitumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, doxorubicin hydrochloride, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without ganitumab in treating patients with newly diagnosed Ewing sarcoma.
    Location: 294 locations

  • Ibrutinib before and after Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies ibrutinib to see how well it works compared to placebo when given before and after stem cell transplant in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Before transplant, stem cells are taken from patients and stored. Patients then receive high doses of chemotherapy to kill cancer cells and make room for healthy cells. After treatment, the stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Ibrutinib is a drug that may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein that is needed for cell growth. It is not yet known whether adding ibrutinib to chemotherapy before and after stem cell transplant may help the transplant work better in patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 243 locations

  • Response and Biology-Based Risk Factor-Guided Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Non-high Risk Neuroblastoma

    This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.
    Location: 186 locations

  • Brentuximab Vedotin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children and Young Adults with Stage IIB or Stage IIIB-IVB Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This randomized phase III trial studies brentuximab vedotin and combination chemotherapy to see how well they work compared to combination chemotherapy alone in treating children and young adults with stage IIB or stage IIIB-IVB Hodgkin lymphoma. Combinations of biological substances in brentuximab vedotin may be able to carry cancer-killing substances directly to Hodgkin lymphoma cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as doxorubicin hydrochloride, bleomycin sulfate, vincristine sulfate, etoposide, prednisone, and cyclophosphamide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known if combination chemotherapy is more effective with or without brentuximab vedotin in treating Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 174 locations

  • Maintenance Chemotherapy or Observation Following Induction Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Ependymoma

    This partially randomized phase III trial is studying maintenance chemotherapy to see how well it works compared to observation following induction chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating young patients with newly diagnosed ependymoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as vincristine sulfate, carboplatin, cyclophosphamide, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) may kill more tumor cells. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells and allow doctors to save the part of the body where the cancer started.
    Location: 178 locations

  • Blinatumomab in Treating Younger Patients with Relapsed B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well blinatumomab works compared with standard combination chemotherapy in treating patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia that has returned after a period of improvement (relapsed). Monoclonal antibodies, such as blinatumomab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether standard combination chemotherapy is more effective than blinatumomab in treating relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 158 locations

  • Response-Based Chemotherapy in Treating Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome in Younger Patients with Down Syndrome

    This phase III trial studies response-based chemotherapy in treating newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Response-based chemotherapy separates patients into different risk groups and treats them according to how they respond to the first course of treatment (Induction I). Response-based treatment may be effective in treating acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome in younger patients with Down syndrome while reducing the side effects.
    Location: 143 locations

  • Erlotinib Hydrochloride or Crizotinib and Chemoradiation Therapy in Treating Patients with Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well erlotinib hydrochloride or crizotinib with chemoradiation therapy works in treating patients with stage III non-small cell lung cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x rays to kill tumor cells. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, etoposide, paclitaxel, and carboplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. It is not yet known whether giving erlotinib hydrochloride is more effective than crizotinib with chemoradiation therapy in treating patients with non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 169 locations

  • Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy work in treating patients with newly diagnosed Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Imatinib mesylate may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving imatinib mesylate and combination chemotherapy may work better in treating patients with Philadelphia chromosome positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 57 locations

  • Standard-Dose Combination Chemotherapy or High-Dose Combination Chemotherapy and Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients with Relapsed or Refractory Germ Cell Tumors

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well standard-dose combination chemotherapy works compared to high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant in treating patients with germ cell tumors that have returned after a period of improvement or did not respond to treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, ifosfamide, cisplatin, carboplatin, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. Giving colony-stimulating factors, such as filgrastim or pegfilgrastim, and certain chemotherapy drugs, helps stem cells move from the bone marrow to the blood so they can be collected and stored. Chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. It is not yet known whether high-dose combination chemotherapy and stem cell transplant are more effective than standard-dose combination chemotherapy in treating patients with refractory or relapsed germ cell tumors.
    Location: 41 locations

  • A Study of ASP2215 Versus Salvage Chemotherapy in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) With FMS-like Tyrosine Kinase (FLT3) Mutation

    The purpose of this study is to determine the clinical benefit of ASP2215 therapy in patients with FMS-like tyrosine kinase (FLT3) mutated acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are refractory to or have relapsed after first-line AML therapy as shown with overall survival (OS) compared to salvage chemotherapy, and to determine the efficacy of ASP2215 therapy as assessed by the rate of complete remission and complete remission with partial hematological recovery (CR / CRh) in these patients. This study will also determine the overall efficacy in event-free survival (EFS) and complete remission (CR) rate of ASP2215 compared to salvage chemotherapy.
    Location: 25 locations

  • Comparing Photon Therapy To Proton Therapy To Treat Patients with Lung Cancer

    This randomized phase III trial studies proton chemoradiotherapy to see how well it works compared to photon chemoradiotherapy in treating patients with stage II-IIIB non-small cell lung cancer that cannot be removed by surgery. Specialized radiation therapy that delivers a high dose of radiation directly to the tumor, such as photon or proton beam radiation therapy, may kill more tumor cells and cause less damage to normal tissue. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as paclitaxel, carboplatin, etoposide, and cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether proton chemoradiotherapy is more effective than photon chemoradiotherapy in treating non-small cell lung cancer.
    Location: 27 locations

  • Bortezomib, Vorinostat, and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Infants with Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of vorinostat and to see how well it works when given together with bortezomib and combination chemotherapy in treating infants (patients less than 1 year old) with newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Bortezomib and vorinostat may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as methotrexate, hydrocortisone, and cytarabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving more than one drug (combination chemotherapy) with bortezomib and vorinostat may be a better treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Treatment Study of Denintuzumab Mafodotin (SGN-CD19A) Plus RICE Versus RICE Alone for Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    The purpose of this randomized, open-label study is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of denintuzumab mafodotin plus RICE (rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide) when compared to RICE alone in the treatment of patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) or Grade 3b follicular lymphoma. Eligible patients must also be candidates for autologous stem cell transplant. Patients will be randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio to receive 3 cycles of study treatment with either denintuzumab mafodotin + RICE or RICE alone. The study will assess whether there is a difference between the 2 groups in the side effects that are reported and the number of patients who achieve complete remission at the end of their study treatment.
    Location: 15 locations

  • R-ICE and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients with First-Relapse / Primary Refractory Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenalidomide when given together with rituximab-ifosfamide-carboplatin-etoposide (R-ICE) and to see how well they work in treating patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement and that has not responded to previous treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as rituximab, ifosfamide, carboplatin, etoposide, and lenalidomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving lenalidomide with R-ICE may be a better treatment for patients with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.
    Location: 11 locations

  • Alisertib Alone or in Combination with Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Younger Patients with Recurrent, Progressive, or Newly Diagnosed Central Nervous System Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors or Extra-Central Nervous System Malignant Rhabdoid Tumors

    This phase II trial studies how well alisertib alone or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation therapy works in treating younger patients with central nervous system (CNS) atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors that are newly diagnosed; have returned; or are growing, spreading, or getting worse or extra-CNS malignant rhabdoid tumors that have returned or are growing, spreading, or getting worse. Alisertib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking a protein called aurora kinase A that is needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses x-rays to kill tumor cells. Giving alisertib alone or with chemotherapy and radiation therapy may be effective in treating patients with rhabdoid tumors.
    Location: 10 locations

  • Vorinostat and Etoposide in Treating Younger Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Solid Tumors

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and the best dose of vorinostat when given together with etoposide and to see how well they work in treating younger patients with refractory or relapsed solid tumors. Vorinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Etoposide is a drug used in chemotherapy that works by stopping tumor cells from dividing and causing them to die. Giving vorinostat together with etoposide may kill more tumor cells.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Chemotherapy, Stem Cell Transplant, and Romidepsin in Treating Patients with T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    This phase II trial studies how well chemotherapy, stem cell transplant, and romidepsin work in treating patients with T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant stops the growth of cancer cells by stopping them from dividing or killing them. The patient’s stem cells that were previously collected are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as romidepsin, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving romidepsin following stem cell transplant may be an effective treatment for T-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    Location: 9 locations

  • Combination Chemotherapy and Lenalidomide in Treating Patients with Newly Diagnosed Stage II-IV Peripheral T-cell Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma

    This phase I / II trial studies the side effects and best dose of lenalidomide when given together with combination chemotherapy and to see how well they work in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage II-IV peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin hydrochloride, vincristine sulfate, and etoposide, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Lenalidomide may stop the growth of peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma by blocking the growth of new blood vessels necessary for cancer growth. Giving combination chemotherapy with lenalidomide may be a better treatment for peripheral T-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
    Location: 8 locations

  • Risk Classification Schemes in Identifying Better Treatment Options for Children and Adolescents with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    This randomized phase III trial studies risk classification schemes in identifying better treatment options for children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Risk factor classification may help identify how strong treatment should be for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.
    Location: 5 locations

  • An Open-Label, First-in-Human Study of the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics of VX-970 in Combination With Cytotoxic Chemotherapy

    An Open-Label, First-in-Human Study of the Safety, Tolerability, and Pharmacokinetics (PK) of VX-970 in Combination With Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors
    Location: 7 locations


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